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5 hours ago, yellowsweatygorilla said:

Carmine Issaco said in the interview that there are some international players getting paid 50-70k in his interview. He suggests that's a reason why salaries get pushed to the lower end for local players.

Duane doesn't deny the existence of outliers. Bekker, Edgar are both known to be top earners, as was De Jong in his first season (think this was blamed for some roster issues in 2019).

De Jong is a case of someone on a decent MLS contract who sees Whitecaps agree to release him. So it wasn't even a loan deal, where teams might split pay in some cases. Now Caps could have agreed to pay a part regardless, to reduce the rest, we don't know. 

MLS loans with CPL clubs paying only part of salaries is a v good option for signing quality without having to pay for all of it. 

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So, remember the early years of TFC and MLS when the young Canadian homegrowns were making 15K and we were criticizing their pay?  In less than 10 years, the homegrown salary is now 50-60K which is ve

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Anyone know what the rules are surrounding taking players on loan?  Not adverse to the practice so long as its very, very limited, max. of a couple-three per team say.  Also not adverse to the parent club covering a portion of the wages so long as the CPL team covers the majority (50% + $1) and the entirety of the loanee's wages is applied against the salary cap.  Don't want to create a dependency on parent clubs for financing or players.  Not to my mind.  Don't want to turn a tool into a crutch if you follow my meaning.

Easy to see how taking players on loan can hit a salary cap pretty hard.  If loanee X cost team Y $40K plus an additional $40K hit on the salary cap that's $40K you can't spent elsewhere whether you want to or not.   The players you pick up on loan better be worth it. 

 

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2 hours ago, Cheeta said:

Anyone know what the rules are surrounding taking players on loan?  Not adverse to the practice so long as its very, very limited, max. of a couple-three per team say.  Also not adverse to the parent club covering a portion of the wages so long as the CPL team covers the majority (50% + $1) and the entirety of the loanee's wages is applied against the salary cap.  Don't want to create a dependency on parent clubs for financing or players.  Not to my mind.  Don't want to turn a tool into a crutch if you follow my meaning.

Easy to see how taking players on loan can hit a salary cap pretty hard.  If loanee X cost team Y $40K plus an additional $40K hit on the salary cap that's $40K you can't spent elsewhere whether you want to or not.   The players you pick up on loan better be worth it. 

 

I am certainly in favour of CPL clubs taking on loans of Canadian players from MLS clubs. I agree that the CPL club should pay Cheeta's 50% +$1 of the players salary. I do not think that applying the entirety  of the loanee's salary against the CPL club's cap serves any positive purpose particularly if the purpose of loaning the player, say Dunn from TFC to a CPL club, is to develop the abilities and value of Dunn and increase the level of the play in the CPL. The number of loanees on a CPL club could be limited to, say, three as Cheeta suggests, but I am much more interested in young Canadian players getting legitimate and useful minutes so they become better players. Furthermore, I want to see the level of play in the CPL improve over time and good young loanees have a part to play in attaining that goal.

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It would be great if someone can share how loans work anywhere in the football world. I kinda assumed it could range anywhere from $1 to 100% and its all depending on the multiple variables. Including how good or how shit the player and or his contract is. I could use the Google machine but thought I would give someone the opportunity to flex their knowledge and edgemecate me.

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20 hours ago, yellowsweatygorilla said:

The only club that provides housing to the majority of the squad is HFX, largely because most of the squad comes from out of town.

At York, housing is pretty much only provided to international players, hence why it's referred to as 'international house'.

So it is an issue in play that would likely drive up the players association's estimated 500k cap expenditure closer to the 750K cap.

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Loans are, as suggested, done in all possible ways imaginable.

The classic model is that you have a player on the roster you don't want to sell and/or doesn't want to be sold, and who the manager determines won't get playing time during the season. The player is informed of this, so agent and club work together on the deal. 

Standard as well is that the borrowing club takes on the entire salary, getting the player's services without paying a transfer fee. Usually loans are never longer than a season or to the next transfer period, a 2-year is very unusual. The loaning club will always retain 1st rights to take the player back; the receiving club often gets and signs an option to buy or reloan in case the parent club doesn't retain. So the rights of both parties are retained, and the player also retains his rights to accept a loan or not,you are never obliged to go if under contract ("I'll take my chances here instead and convince the coach"). 

When a club loans a younger player it feels needs playing time he won't get at the home club, for developmental purposes, and faced with few takers, it may decide to provide an incentive, reducing the loan cost. This is what I imagine may occur with MLS to CPL or USL: to convince them they only ask for a % of the salary as they'll deal with the rest. This also has to do with tiers and league level, as the salary structures may be radically different, where the interested club couldn't meet all of the requirement in financial terms, but does meet those of a sporting/play quality nature. 

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Out of curiosity, do we have any labour lawyers on this site?

IMO, soccer, unlike most North American sports, acts like a true free market whereby players have numerous options to seek employment.  Most players have representatives (agents) that are hired to to find a club that best fits the player's priorities.  If maximum pay is the highest priority, there are other options and its incumbent on the player's agent to identify a club that is willing to meet those priorities.  Put aside international status in other leagues for a second. 

If a player elects to sign a contract, then the player accepts the terms of the deal.  If there are breaches to said contract, either by player or employer, there would be an outlined process to address those breaches in hopes to find a resolution.  If a 25% reduction in pay is a breach, players should be within their rights to seek remedy, however, I would think that there would be a signed agreement or waiver with players to reduce wages.  I don't think an employer can outright do that without the employees consent unless there was a reduction in term which may relate back to the shortened season but even then I would think there was a something signed.

Secondly, can someone explain to me the process of a union being ratified?  Quick google search:

To get a union into your workplace, you need to have at least 40% of workers sign union membership cards. Then you can apply to the Ontario Labour Relations Board. Usually, the Board sets up a voting process. You need to get more than 50% of the votes in favour of the union.
 
Has this part happened? If not, why should the CanPL recognize a union prematurely? Why would any business recognize a union before its recognized by the employees themselves?  Serious question. As far as I know, the union is made up for maybe 20-30 players so short of the mark.

While I understand the concept of a union, I fail to see how the players themselves benefit at this juncture in the league.  Often times, a Union becomes a tax on the employer and the employee alike reducing the overall pot to be distributed.  Unions ask for better working conditions, benefits, vacation and sick pay etc..  With CanPl, have their been complaints about the conditions for players outside of pay? Serious question? Do players not like the Dominican preseason trips? Living accommodations? Meals? Access to Physio and Medical etc.?

If this comes down to a singular grievance about wages, I would think that this is the job of the agents, would it not?  Why would a player want to pay union fees to seek higher percentage of revenues for a league they plan the leave in 1-3 years.  Serious question. 

On a side note, I had to stop following the twitter post of PFA Can because it came across as personal, unprofessional and obnoxious.  Maybe the strategy is rally the emotions of players to unite behind their banner but as a fan, I have the instant reaction that it is undermining the league unnecessarily and in the long run, once recognized, the legal council and executive director will be making more than the players.  To

Bottom line, the standard of play needs to increase to produce better players.  To me, that means salaries need to increase.   But it's going to take sometime.

I'm open to learning another perspective.

 

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11 minutes ago, DigzTFC said:

IMO, soccer, unlike most North American sports, acts like a true free market whereby players have numerous options to seek employment.  Most players have representatives (agents) that are hired to to find a club that best fits the player's priorities.  If maximum pay is the highest priority, there are other options and its incumbent on the player's agent to identify a club that is willing to meet those priorities.  Put aside international status in other leagues for a second. 

If a player elects to sign a contract, then the player accepts the terms of the deal.  If there are breaches to said contract, either by player or employer, there would be an outlined process to address those breaches in hopes to find a resolution.  If a 25% reduction in pay is a breach, players should be within their rights to seek remedy, however, I would think that there would be a signed agreement or waiver with players to reduce wages.  I don't think an employer can outright do that without the employees consent unless there was a reduction in term which may relate back to the shortened season but even then I would think there was a something signed.

I maintain that the league needs a floor. 10k is way too low but it escapes some people that football is global and there's a market beyond Canada

Is it CPL's duty to inflate a player's value beyond their value? Does that really helps the player if once he's released, no one else will match what he used to earn in CPL? He'll have to either retire or lower his price.

I think rookies and young domestics are criminally underpaid and a floor is a must while addressing that disparity but some of it is expected. 

Lastly, we're in a pandemic with year 2 and 3 likely with no ticket revenue. Can we have things go back to normal and judge the league on their move then? 

19 minutes ago, DigzTFC said:

Secondly, can someone explain to me the process of a union being ratified?  Quick google search:

To get a union into your workplace, you need to have at least 40% of workers sign union membership cards. Then you can apply to the Ontario Labour Relations Board. Usually, the Board sets up a voting process. You need to get more than 50% of the votes in favour of the union.
 
Has this part happened? If not, why should the CanPL recognize a union prematurely? Why would any business recognize a union before its recognized by the employees themselves?  Serious question. As far as I know, the union is made up for maybe 20-30 players so short of the mark.

Since the league operates coast to coast and labour boards are provincial, they have to apply to all of them which takes time.

While I share everyone's sentiment that the league should have recognized them outright, were all pro-players, there's a due process in place and the employer is within its right to chose not to do so. That's business and the overwhelming majority of businesses do the same thing.

It took decades for USL to get a union, 6 years for MLS, CPL will get there much faster.

24 minutes ago, DigzTFC said:

While I understand the concept of a union, I fail to see how the players themselves benefit at this juncture in the league.  Often times, a Union becomes a tax on the employer and the employee alike reducing the overall pot to be distributed.  Unions ask for better working conditions, benefits, vacation and sick pay etc..  With CanPl, have their been complaints about the conditions for players outside of pay? Serious question? Do players not like the Dominican preseason trips? Living accommodations? Meals? Access to Physio and Medical etc.?

Benefits outweighs the cost of union dues. On that, a CPL union is absolutely necessary for so many reason. Over 90% voted for it so it should happen.

This will lead to better conditions and better pay. Perhaps the DR preseason won't happen again but most would prefer better wages and conditiins than that. Also, nothing indicates that this was going to be a yearly tradition.

27 minutes ago, DigzTFC said:

If this comes down to a singular grievance about wages, I would think that this is the job of the agents, would it not?  Why would a player want to pay union fees to seek higher percentage of revenues for a league they plan the leave in 1-3 years.  Serious question. 

Solidarity, some players wants to make their passion a livelihood and CPL might be it for them. I mean, there's TONS of room for improvements even if you're there only a year or 2. It's not just about wages... so it's definately worth it 

I also think that the off season is too long and they are condensing the season as a wage control mechanism. They are paying that wage over up to 7 months of work...I don't like how its easy for some to make the dangerous correlation that low wages are attached to that. BS, stretch out the season to allow better recovery from trips and injuries for players - that's another way working conditions can really suck.

Like I said TONS of room for improvement, the union is needed to provide level the playing field when negotiating with the employer to increase the player's leverage.

Right now, owners holds all the cards while players are at the heart of the revenues for the league. They deserve a bigger piece of the pie

 

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6 hours ago, DigzTFC said:

To get a union into your workplace, you need to have at least 40% of workers sign union membership cards. Then you can apply to the Ontario Labour Relations Board. Usually, the Board sets up a voting process. You need to get more than 50% of the votes in favour of the union.

 
Has this part happened? If not, why should the CanPL recognize a union prematurely? Why would any business recognize a union before its recognized by the employees themselves?  Serious question. As far as I know, the union is made up for maybe 20-30 players so short of the mark.

 

96% of CanPL players during early-2020 signed union cards. That is unprecedented; usually it's 40-50%.

The union is seeking voluntary certification, to avoid the drawn out public battle that is happening right now and both sides incurring further cost by engaging in a contested certification process in five different jurisdictions. With all the negative PR right now, the league may fold ... but then again it's lead by an infamous union buster (and not that it's 100% relevant, but Nick Bontis was a keynote speaker for multiple years at Labourwatch, an infamous unionbusting conference), so there's still a good chance that the league's obstinance will force the players into formally filing with the various Labour Relations Boards, where I have full confidence there will be a sweeping vote (especially considering labour conditions and remunerations have gone even worse since 2019).

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Really thoughtful answers fellas. I appreciate it.

With regards to negative PR, only nerds like us know about it.  I think the league would be in peril due to lack of revenues and I can't see how there are fans in the stands this year either.  If the league can navigate this next year without folding, I believe the league will be permanent and grow.  There is far too much untapped summer revenue for pro sports in Canada.  I think it will all work out to be honest.  Yes, we should absolutely let things go back to normal to judge the league.  I think the CPL done an outstanding job frankly. 

So here's my bias: I've operated a business of 500 people during the pandemic with 2 forced closures and have lived through the endless cycle of lawyers, consultants, health and safety consultants and painful employee lay offs just to keep the doors opened.  There are real fixed cost just to keep the lights on which sometimes is not fully appreciated by all sides including government programs to help businesses.  Most of which require an accounting firm to navigate an application for. 

It has been a wild ride and the very fact the league hasn't folded already and hasn't made any overtures that it is in trouble is a testament to how strong the ownership group is and how committed they are.  I'm actually quite encouraged by the league.  I assume the league is incurring $500k a year+ lawyer fees to respond to every letter Professional Footballers Association Canada sends and to understand the labour laws in each province.  It's so bloody hard guys, honestly.  So I apologize for having a clear bias towards the business as it tries to stay afloat to reemploy people.  Owners and operators are people too trying to do their best.

On a side note, I thought the league reached out to the Union in designing the Island Games did it not? Is that not a form recognition? It may not be recognition in a legal sense but it shows communications with players.

Also, what additional revenue would the league have shared with the players union in 2020? or potentially in 2021 if the league has to do the same thing? Serious question.  The revenue from One Soccer? Does anyone know what it is? IMO there's no way the clubs and league are making money at this point.  I'm a HFX Wanderers fan.  I wonder what the stadium rental fee is for instance per year.  My suspicion, is that the league doesn't want to recognize the union until it has to because 1) the expense and 2) they will have to share the P/L and it will leak and undermine to professional branding on CPL.

This is the tweet that really undermined PFAC's professionalism in my mind.  Not only are they speculating and don't know the facts around the Commissioner's salary and posting this as fact but they also don't know if he cut his salary, lost a bonus etc.  Furthermore, even if the commissioner continued to collect his full salary, for the very reason most fans liked his appointment originally is why he merits the salary.  It's a cheap shot and quite frankly it doesn't lead to a better working relationship.   There are other tweets similar to this are just retweeting other people criticizing the league.  That's my opinion.  Others may see these tweets as poignant and winning arguments.

CPL Commissioner David Clanachan likely earns as much or more than an entire CPL club of players salaries. Where is #PlayerFairness?

Thoughts?

 

 

 

 

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On 2/20/2021 at 12:36 AM, yellowsweatygorilla said:

Carmine Issaco said in the interview that there are some international players getting paid 50-70k in his interview. He suggests that's a reason why salaries get pushed to the lower end for local players.

Duane doesn't deny the existence of outliers. Bekker, Edgar are both known to be top earners, as was De Jong in his first season (think this was blamed for some roster issues in 2019).

And that is reinforced by guys like Viti going back for part of the European season. If a player can pull in 30-40k here, with housing and another 30-40k in Europe, depending how much of the season he can squeeze in - that's a more reasonable living.

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7 hours ago, DigzTFC said:

 

On a side note, I thought the league reached out to the Union in designing the Island Games did it not? Is that not a form recognition? It may not be recognition in a legal sense but it shows communications with players.

The league did not reach out to the union to design the Island Games. In fact there has been no communication between the league and the union. The closest to that was during a player meeting during the Island Games, where Clanachan promised to have a meeting about union issues after the season but as of February, he has yet to communicate. This was why players were so angry about the Island Games - some players told me they apparently only heard about the pay deferral (that later became a cut) through social media.

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Also, what additional revenue would the league have shared with the players union in 2020? or potentially in 2021 if the league has to do the same thing? Serious question.  The revenue from One Soccer? Does anyone know what it is?

Revenue sharing isn't a demand right now - again, the union has offered to forego collective bargaining for one year (I previously said two years, but looks like the two years was referring to 2020 .. and seeing as they didn't do voluntary certification, it's one year now). The investment from One Soccer is $200 million over 10 years, but part of that is for production costs. There is more desire about salary minimums is what I am told.

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This is the tweet that really undermined PFAC's professionalism in my mind.  Not only are they speculating and don't know the facts around the Commissioner's salary and posting this as fact but they also don't know if he cut his salary, lost a bonus etc.  Furthermore, even if the commissioner continued to collect his full salary, for the very reason most fans liked his appointment originally is why he merits the salary.  It's a cheap shot and quite frankly it doesn't lead to a better working relationship.   There are other tweets similar to this are just retweeting other people criticizing the league.  That's my opinion.  Others may see these tweets as poignant and winning arguments.

CPL Commissioner David Clanachan likely earns as much or more than an entire CPL club of players salaries. Where is #PlayerFairness?

Thoughts?

My own biases - I am a rank and file union steward, and had previously worked as a union organizer. This type of messaging resonates with me and taps into ongoing frustrations about how many of the rich in society have either grown in fortune or were much better equipped to weather the pandemic. It's been no different with the CanPL, I've heard complaints that those making the least in the league (players and league staff) have all been made to take pay cuts but not a single VP was subjected to this and continue with wasteful spending. Usually, as part of a CBA, the employer may ask to union to put out conciliatory messaging ... but without a CBA (or any communication, let alone positive overtures from the employer), anything goes. This messaging was likely not directed towards you, and I'd say it's been pretty effective with the broader fan base in places like discord, twitter, and reddit.

 

Oh wait ... just noticed that PFA tweet is a RT of my tweet lol. I guess that's why it appeals to me.

 

Edited by yellowsweatygorilla
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https://briarpatchmagazine.com/articles/view/levelling-the-playing-field

I had a chance to speak to Marcel De Jong and a number of players who had to remain anonymous, along with Dan Kurk and a bunch of supporters for this piece.

I know there's been a lot of articles on this for the past week, but I focus a little more on union busting history in soccer leadership. The PFACan is in particular concerned about Nick Bontis links to Labour Watch, probably the largest unionbusting conference in the country, considering the PFACan was in charge of following FIFA mandates to urge leagues to consult players and their unions for pay deferrals/cuts.

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9 hours ago, Shway said:

https://northerntribune.ca/marcel-de-jong-canadian-premier-league-wages/

Another significant player stating the obvious. 

From the article :

"De Jong expresses that the players don’t object to the salary cap itself, which was put in place to ensure responsible salary expenditure from clubs in a growing league. Rather, he suggests that the players want a salary floor to avoid poverty wages and a requirement for alternative jobs."

 

If the floor is 10K like its been mentioned (not unreasonable considering the age of the new league, the current pandemic, other league's like USL that the CPL has often been compared to) then a jump to a salary floor with what the players association would deem a minimum avoiding so called "poverty wages" would likely be a big one that wouldn't be happening for at least a couple/few years.

Would also likely make growth of the level of play and Canadian players stagnate with higher wages for higher talented players that help in this regard being curtailed and many of those type of players look outside the CPL.

Fact is where CPL is at now and all considering, CPL U-sports, rookies, and younger inexperienced players will not be making full time wages strictly with a CPL salary and this reality shouldn't surprise anyone.

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12 hours ago, yellowsweatygorilla said:

https://briarpatchmagazine.com/articles/view/levelling-the-playing-field

I had a chance to speak to Marcel De Jong and a number of players who had to remain anonymous, along with Dan Kurk and a bunch of supporters for this piece.

I know there's been a lot of articles on this for the past week, but I focus a little more on union busting history in soccer leadership. The PFACan is in particular concerned about Nick Bontis links to Labour Watch, probably the largest unionbusting conference in the country, considering the PFACan was in charge of following FIFA mandates to urge leagues to consult players and their unions for pay deferrals/cuts.

Great article, very well written. 

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7 hours ago, CDNFootballer said:

From the article :

"De Jong expresses that the players don’t object to the salary cap itself, which was put in place to ensure responsible salary expenditure from clubs in a growing league. Rather, he suggests that the players want a salary floor to avoid poverty wages and a requirement for alternative jobs."

 

If the floor is 10K like its been mentioned (not unreasonable considering the age of the new league, the current pandemic, other league's like USL that the CPL has often been compared to) then a jump to a salary floor with what the players association would deem a minimum avoiding so called "poverty wages" would likely be a big one that wouldn't be happening for at least a couple/few years.

Would also likely make growth of the level of play and Canadian players stagnate with higher wages for higher talented players that help in this regard being curtailed and many of those type of players look outside the CPL.

Fact is where CPL is at now and all considering, CPL U-sports, rookies, and younger inexperienced players will not be making full time wages strictly with a CPL salary and this reality shouldn't surprise anyone.

Let's get real. If anyone had suggested on here three years ago that Canada's new D1 would have many/most of its Canadian players on semi-pro level money, they would have been ridiculed and shouted down.

I knew the league would be considerably smaller scale than the fantasy scenario being peddled by Duane Rollins but I wasn't expecting what the CPFA have been describing, because this can easily be avoided without going crazy in a fiscal sense.

An extra $15k for eight players is only $120k. Dial back on imports from the bloated quota of seven to the CSL's three and adjust the payscale accordingly and you are already well below $100k as the extra amount needing to be paid to domestics and don't even need to hit anywhere near the $750k cap to have a floor of $25k or so in place.

14 hours ago, yellowsweatygorilla said:

...The PFACan is in particular concerned about Nick Bontis links to Labour Watch, probably the largest unionbusting conference in the country, considering the PFACan was in charge of following FIFA mandates to urge leagues to consult players and their unions for pay deferrals/cuts....

Think it is David Clanachan that's more likely to be the issue. Don't know Nick Bontis well but did run into him quite a bit about 20 years ago in London, Ont soccer circles and he is passionate about soccer first and foremost. Seriously doubt he has been elevated to his current post as some sort of anti-union hitman.

Edited by Ozzie_the_parrot
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I dont like the fact that the league is paying peanuts anymore than the next guy.  I suspect there plan was always to be prudent and get through year 1 and build from there.  And then a global pandemic hit and last year they had no fans (ie. no real revenue) and this year is likely to be some of the same.  I get how that is challenging for the players and as we have seen, some have left the game which is very unfortunate.  But expecting them to raise wages (even by putting in a floor) is unwise at this moment in my view as frankly, their focus needs to be on survival during this period.  Hope 2022 is back to normal and then they can build from there in the lead up to 2026 where they should definitely get a bump.

I dont think people realise how surprising and good it is that we havent had any of the 8 sides fold or at least change ownership especially as this league only existed for one year prior to Covid.  I know some will say the owners were selected to be in this for the long run but that long run got seriously extended by the pandemic.  I highly suspect that one or two of these sides might have folded if it wasnt for the belief that 2026 will have a big impact on the viability of the league.

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2 hours ago, An Observer said:

...But expecting them to raise wages (even by putting in a floor) is unwise at this moment in my view as frankly, their focus needs to be on survival during this period...

Thing is though the salaries that are being revealed are the pre-COVID 2019 ones. The core of the soccer community soon knows what the reality is even when a league is trying to project a misleading image of itself as a fully professional big budget D1.

Unlike 40 or 50 years ago when you could attract 5000+ for a big NSL game in southern Ontario relatively few people in the larger markets are going to bother with something that's substantially semi-pro in this day and age when webstreams of fully pro level games are easily available from top leagues all over the world.

Once you have a reputation for being less than fully pro it is very difficult to shake it off again. There's a red line on how far it is sensible to cut costs in this area and they appear to have already crossed it in year one despite the sums of money involved to largely remedy the issue being as low as $100k or so.

On the other side of things I think people like Marcel de Jong need to ponder the full implications of that a bit and also acknowledge that the seats were often alarmingly empty in Langford, Edmonton and at York U to an extent greater than announced attendance numbers would imply. Vertigo inducing camera angles were being used at THF in Hamilton for a reason.

It was impossible to broach this subject on here in 2019 without a barrage of abuse from the usual suspects who were determined to spin a narrative of the league being a huge success regardless of what was really happening, but it's a cold hard reality that also needs to be faced.

Suggesting a floor of around $40k would be out of tune with where the league is right now in the other direction, but if there had been more realism from the outset about how well the league was really doing there's a good chance those expectations would not be there in the first place. If you spin a yarn about $150 million from Mediapro, players are naturally going to wonder what is going on when they are only being offered $12k and are told to shut up about it or else...

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Didn't realize The Briar Patch was still kicking. Blast from the past.

Good article, although calling Marcus Haber a Can PL star is a bit generous. ;)

I think player/union messaging could use some more focus.

I don't think the idea of Canadian soccer players in an upstart home-grown league having to get an offseason job or claim offseason EI is going to really rouse the support of the general public, offseason EI is the norm in a number of fields and it all seems the price to pay for living the dream. Ditto hardcore fans, as 40/42 week contracts are the norm in many semi-pro leagues. Heck we run regional junior hockey leagues that draw 5000-10000 spectators and pay the players a per diem.

Focusing solely on in-season wages and benefits and living conditions and risks would be a more compelling argument, particularly stories of players not being able to make ends meet mid season or being left flat broke because they fail to garner appearance bonuses, while executives make a living wage.

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6 hours ago, Ozzie_the_parrot said:

Think it is David Clanachan that's more likely to be the issue. Don't know Nick Bontis well but did run into him quite a bit about 20 years ago in London, Ont soccer circles and he is passionate about soccer first and foremost. Seriously doubt he has been elevated to his current post as some sort of anti-union hitman.

I agree. I am not sure Dan Kruk's point was that Nick Bontis is being sent in to deal with the PFACan, but when I brought up the information I had that Bontis is involved with Labourwatch, the largest unionbusting conference/org in the country, they expressed worry that it may have influenced CSA's inaction in ensuring CanPL followed FIFA directives to consult and seek agreement with players and their unions.

 

45 minutes ago, The Real Marc said:

Didn't realize The Briar Patch was still kicking. Blast from the past.

Good article, although calling Marcus Haber a Can PL star is a bit generous. ;)

I think player/union messaging could use some more focus.

 

Haha, yes briarpatch is still around. They've published four of my articles so I am grateful.

Haber might not have lit the league up, but he was one of the more high profile players (just had to contextualize it for Briarpatch's mostly soccer illiterate readership :p)

 

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According to Rollins in his D2 article unless something changes the league may be at 8 teams for the foreseeable future. It’s likely that the Quebec team doesn’t happen and there is no investor for a Montreal team. There won’t be a prairie team for a while.

 

weird hearing this as people had said that Fraser Valley was it ? Was a go for 2022 and then talk of 2 MTL teams and the Bundesliga being involved.

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