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Jith12

Jordyn Huitema

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7 hours ago, Jith12 said:

Huitema has elected to forgo college and turn pro. Thoughts?

https://www.sportsnet.ca/soccer/canadian-teenager-jordyn-huitema-opts-forgo-college-turn-pro/

I think I like it.  College will be there later and it has at times felt like the level of play in NCAA has held Jessie Fleming back.  This is probably the best move for the development of her game.

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Good decision, she wants to be a professional soccer player and is already on a trajectory to do so? then do it, college level will just hold back her development at this point. She can always go back once her career as a soccer player ends

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I agree with Huitema's decision as well, but she can't go straight into NWSL like this, right? Would Europe be the only legitimate option in this scenario? 

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23 minutes ago, Jith12 said:

I agree with Huitema's decision as well, but she can't go straight into NWSL like this, right? Would Europe be the only legitimate option in this scenario? 

As far as I can tell she would've had to declare for the NWSL draft if she wanted to play there this season. 

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NCAA didn't seem to hurt Lawrence or Buchanan, and Fleming is still a standout.   If Huitema went to Stanford or UCLA, I don't see that it would have hurt her development.  Those are two of the best programs in the US. 

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I like the decision. Full time training + getting paid good bucks for an 18 year old (will make more money than I did at 22 coming out of university). She'll be a good role model for other top end Canadian youth players to look beyond the NCAA.

This is the proven model on the men's side. So, for the women's play to advance to another level or two, they need to devote more time to their development vs the part-time and limited breadth of the NCAA. We already see this advancement in countries like Spain. For Canada not to fall behind, we need more players in the top clubs sooner.

I prefer she ends in Europe with their infrastructure, technical skills, football culture and money advantage over the NWSL. 

 

Edited by red card

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1 hour ago, red card said:

I like the decision. Full time training + getting paid good bucks for an 18 year old (will make more money than I did at 22 coming out of university). She'll be a good role model for other top end Canadian youth players to look beyond the NCAA.

This is the proven model on the men's side. So, for the women's play to advance to another level or two, they need to devote more time to their development vs the part-time and limited breadth of the NCAA. We already see this advancement in countries like Spain. For Canada not to fall behind, we need more players in the top clubs sooner.

I prefer she ends in Europe with their infrastructure, technical skills, football culture and money advantage over the NWSL. 

 

How much can a professional female soccer player make per year?  A free ride at a top US university definitely has a cash value to it and may pay off more over the course of your entire life, depending on how long your soccer career is.

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44 minutes ago, AvroArrow said:

How much can a professional female soccer player make per year?  A free ride at a top US university definitely has a cash value to it and may pay off more over the course of your entire life, depending on how long your soccer career is.

There's not always a lot of detail money-wise (and it varies a lot from league to league and club to club), but as a comparable, when Lindsey Horan signed with PSG out of high school it was reported to be a six-figure deal, so if she's actually signing with PSG it could be quite a bit - in addition to the fact that she'd be allowed to accept sponsorship money now. 

Edited by carolynduthie

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33 minutes ago, carolynduthie said:

There's not always a lot of detail money-wise (and it varies a lot from league to league and club to club), but as a comparable, when Lindsey Horan signed with PSG out of high school it was reported to be a six-figure deal, so if she's actually signing with PSG it could be quite a bit - in addition to the fact that she'd be allowed to accept sponsorship money now. 

I assume that she could never play NCAA though once she has played professionally?

I would guess that a full scholarship to Stanford for 4 years would be worth $US 50-60 thousand per year?  

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Stanford would be more than that but in terms of education in Canada we are very fortunate and have great affordable programs.

The choice for someone young and with talent and motivation and options is:

a) Do education primary and on the side have a short amateur season of soccer for 4-5 years and then turn pro, or
b) Turn pro primary and do education both on the side and after

Curious if she's been talking to Bayern. I saw them earlier in the year and watching them move a ball through the middle was poetry.

Edited by Vic
t-y-p-o

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Just read she's been living with a billeted family. Sounds like she's already been living all-in for a while.

Being a pro is tough work. The ups and downs, fighting for time against very talented teammates, constantly believing in yourself, different cultures, injuries, etc. You need to be talented but also very driven and focused because the distractions can be overwhelming. Especially when you're her age.

Competing against NCAA scholarshipped athletes and succeeding is one thing. Doing it against international players and professionals of all ages is another level entirely.

Twenty or thirty years ago you could become a Hooper or Sinclair or Hegerberg without going pro at her age. I don't think you can anymore. Maybe Jessie Fleming will prove that wrong. Hope so, but if she does I imagine she's one of a small number of exceptions who don't fit the pattern. Like Socrates who became an actual doctor while playing.

Decisions like hers change things and have a very big impact on others in her footsteps down the road.

Best of luck to her, wherever she lands I hope it's a quality program in terms of developing  young players.

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1 hour ago, Vic said:

Twenty or thirty years ago you could become a Hooper or Sinclair or Hegerberg without going pro at her age. I don't think you can anymore. Maybe Jessie Fleming will prove that wrong. Hope so, but if she does I imagine she's one of a small number of exceptions who don't fit the pattern. Like Socrates who became an actual doctor while playing.

With a name like that he would've been a failure if he didn't become a doctor!

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On 1/24/2019 at 8:17 PM, Jith12 said:

I agree with Huitema's decision as well, but she can't go straight into NWSL like this, right? Would Europe be the only legitimate option in this scenario? 

She could in theory go straight into the NWSL because Mal Pugh did, but I'm not sure the money would be there for a Canadian.  US players get more money from US soccer, and I believe there were some sponsorship deals for Pugh that sweetened the pot.  I suppose if Nike wanted to sponsor her with a nice deal, NWSL could be on the table.  I think Europe is more likely.

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On 1/25/2019 at 11:34 AM, AvroArrow said:

How much can a professional female soccer player make per year?  A free ride at a top US university definitely has a cash value to it and may pay off more over the course of your entire life, depending on how long your soccer career is.

Average salaries in top leagues like French, English & German are about C$50k. In top clubs such as Lyon, the average salary is about C$250k. NWSL average is only about C$35k.

Top players in top clubs in these leagues make more around C$100k - which I believe is the closer range for Lawrence & Buchanan. Elite players in top clubs make C$200-300k. Elite players haul can be 2-3x higher than their salary based on marketing deals. 

Plus, as with the men, there should more opps opening up for woman players after their playing career is over. 

 

Edited by red card

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Given that she is Canadian, there are lot of really good schools in this country you can afford to go to later.  If she was American, then I think having the degree from a top school which is like buying your way into a different class can really change your life down there. 

It's really win win. I don't think there is a wrong decision save for playing NWSL in podunk America for peanuts vs some nice European city where just learning another language could be considered an education in and of itself... 

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, MrsC said:

She could in theory go straight into the NWSL because Mal Pugh did, but I'm not sure the money would be there for a Canadian.  US players get more money from US soccer, and I believe there were some sponsorship deals for Pugh that sweetened the pot.  I suppose if Nike wanted to sponsor her with a nice deal, NWSL could be on the table.  I think Europe is more likely.

She theoretically would have had to declare for the NWSL draft if she wanted to play in NWSL this year. (I say theoretically because the NWSL has never been one to enforce their own rules, but they changed the draft so that anyone who would be 18 during the season could declare, and say that if you're eligible and don't declare you can't sign until the end of the season.)

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15 hours ago, carolynduthie said:

She theoretically would have had to declare for the NWSL draft if she wanted to play in NWSL this year. (I say theoretically because the NWSL has never been one to enforce their own rules, but they changed the draft so that anyone who would be 18 during the season could declare, and say that if you're eligible and don't declare you can't sign until the end of the season.)

Mal Pugh didn't go through the draft though because she was an allocated National Team member.  She went through the unattached allocation order and the Spirit got her because they were at the top of the Distribution list.  Pugh had a guaranteed salary of 200,000 as US allocated player, and Canada Soccer is clearly not going to pay her that, so NWSL still seems unlikely.  Sky Blue is presumably at the top of the 2019 distribution list unless they traded it, so that makes it even more unlikely that she would choose the NWSL.

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23 minutes ago, MrsC said:

Mal Pugh didn't go through the draft though because she was an allocated National Team member.  She went through the unattached allocation order and the Spirit got her because they were at the top of the Distribution list.  Pugh had a guaranteed salary of 200,000 as US allocated player, and Canada Soccer is clearly not going to pay her that, so NWSL still seems unlikely.  Sky Blue is presumably at the top of the 2019 distribution list unless they traded it, so that makes it even more unlikely that she would choose the NWSL.

Mal Pugh didn't go through the draft because she wasn't eligible to declare for it when she decided to go pro (they only opened it up to pre-college grads this year). Nichelle Prince, Janine Beckie, and Rebecca Quinn and Kailen Sheridan all went through the draft and then were allocated and had their salaries paid by Canada Soccer (ditto for a bunch of American players - Emily Sonnett and Rose Lavelle were both drafted and subsidized in their draft years), so presumably Huitema would also have to declare. 

Edited by carolynduthie

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40 minutes ago, carolynduthie said:

Mal Pugh didn't go through the draft because she wasn't eligible to declare for it when she decided to go pro (they only opened it up to pre-college grads this year). Nichelle Prince, Janine Beckie, and Rebecca Quinn and Kailen Sheridan all went through the draft and then were allocated and had their salaries paid by Canada Soccer (ditto for a bunch of American players - Emily Sonnett and Rose Lavelle were both drafted and subsidized in their draft years), so presumably Huitema would also have to declare. 

Yeah.  They created the allocation rules specifically for Pugh, so if they really wanted Huitema in the NWSL Canada could announce her as allocated in advance.  I think it's all moot though because I can't see her choosing this option.

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Wow. I think that is the first time I've seen two women have a conversation in the women's forum. Kind of threw me when I realized it. You're both not just knowledgeable and very intelligent but way ahead of your time and add so much perspective and insight to this forum.

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[  1  ]    If the  rules for the NWSL distribution process in 2019 are the same  as the rules used in 2018 then there is a pathway for Jordyn Huitema  to play in the NWSL this year, this season. Huitema would have to really want to play in the NWSL and not care about what team she joined  AND  the CSA would  have to want her playing in the NWSL  and then  subsidize/allocate  Jordyn Huitema  upfront.The distribution process  from the 2018 NWSL roster rules  specify that  an allocated Player whose rights have not yet been assigned to an NWSL team is the type of individual who can enter the NWSL via the Distribution process.   As for the 18 year old rule, Huitema would obviously have to wait until   her 18th birthday in May ( 2019 )  to play her first NWSL match. 

http://www.nwslsoccer.com/2017-roster-rules

      It is the current practice for  the   CSA  to wait for a  Canadian college player  to be drafted by a   NWSL club  and then subsidize that  drafted player after the fact ( if they deem the player to be worth subsidizing in the first place ) This is to avoid what happened to Bryanna Mcarthy in 2013 who   joined  the  WNY Flash straight out of college via  allocation by the CSA and who skipped  the 2013 NWSL College draft. Long story short, WNY Flash felt that they were saddled with a player they didn't want and they virtually never played McCarthy . Thus by subsidizing the college  player  after they are drafted  the CSA can be sure that a  NWSL team wants the player before they  subsidize her. But this is just a  practice, they don't always  have to do it this way . And  Jordan Huitema is not Bryanna McCarthy . So  if the CSA allocated Huitema  up front then my guess  is a lot NWSL teams would want to claim her via  distribution.

       That said,  the NWSL is full of downsides: Huitema would have no say in what NWSL  team would get her--  with suspect  sides like Sky Blue or the Washington Spirit potentially having the first crack at her. And  Jordan Huitema  would play for the CSA subsidized  salary  which may be less than what she could earn elsewhere.

[ 2 ]     A little Sky Blue pile on:

- Players don't go to Sky Blue. Players end up in Sky Blue. /sarc.

- Sky Blue . The destination team for condemned soccer players./sarc

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