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Found 14 results

  1. "The Premier Development League (PDL) Washington Crossfire have apparently had their rights in the league sold to an unknown group in Vancouver, BC." https://goalwashington.wordpress.com/2016/12/14/washington-crossfire-pdl-rights-reportedly-sold-to-group-in-vancouver-bc/
  2. It’s a bad day to be a soccer fan in Winnipeg or Hamilton. Ironically, the first two cities to commit to being part of the Canadian Premier League were the two notable cities not included on the list of cities Canada has approached to apply to be a host city in the 2026 World Cup. Obviously, this will be a moot point if Morocco somehow takes the bid away from the hugely favourite United North America bid, but few think that will happen. So, it’s basically the end of any dream that either city will ever host a World Cup. It’s a double blow for Hamilton in that they were also left off the Women’s World Cup rotation in 2015. It’s a shame because the city was a wonderful host to the Pan Am tournament and a women’s pre-tournament friendly between England and Canada. It’s a bit baffling, actually. Tim Horton’s Field is only 24,000, sure, but it can be expanded to 40,000 (and possibly even more for a major event like a World Cup). Since it seems unlikely that the CSA is springing this on these cities blindly, it could be that the City of Hamilton turned down the chance to bid. In fact, that's the noise that many are suggesting -- that Hamilton turned down the chance to bid. That seems short-sighted, but I’m not a Hamilton rate payer. Much of what was written about Hamilton can be extended to Winnipeg. Two new stadiums in cities that don’t traditionally get looked at to host major events….surprising, to say the least. And, once again, it appears that Winnipeg came to the conclusion on their own. There weren’t a lot of shocks among the cities included. Both Toronto and Montreal were invited to apply with two stadiums – BMO Field/Stade Saputo and The Stadium Formally Known as SkyDome/Olympic Stadium – and the rest of the cities – Ottawa, Regina, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver are basically the default cities that pop up in these conversations. The two biggest questions among the included cities might be Montreal and Calgary. The Big O is an old 43 years now. It’s hard to imagine it not being held together by duct tape and empty bottles of Old Vienna by 2026. Saputo is the smallest of the stadiums included. It would take a major renovation to get up to the required size (although with the Habs having never hosted an outdoor NHL game that might be of interest to the city). Calgary has no legitimate option other than to build something new. McMahon Stadium is already 57 years old and it’s never been called anything other than functional, even by its fans. It seems likely that Calgary has been included to add further support to an ongoing effort to completely overhaul the city’s sports infrastructure. Calgary wants to build a new hockey rink, multipurpose stadium and host the 2026 Winter Olympics. Hosting a couple extra World Cup games a few months after the big party would be the icing on that very expensive cake. Mexico only put three cities forward, so you’d imagine they plan an even split of games. That’s not in Canada’s nature – the games here will be split equally between the east and the west.
  3. It’s a bad day to be a soccer fan in Winnipeg or Hamilton. Ironically, the first two cities to commit to being part of the Canadian Premier League were the two notable cities not included on the list of cities Canada has approached to apply to be a host city in the 2026 World Cup. Obviously, this will be a moot point if Morocco somehow takes the bid away from the hugely favourite United North America bid, but few think that will happen. So, it’s basically the end of any dream that either city will ever host a World Cup. It’s a double blow for Hamilton in that they were also left off the Women’s World Cup rotation in 2015. It’s a shame because the city was a wonderful host to the Pan Am tournament and a women’s pre-tournament friendly between England and Canada. It’s a bit baffling, actually. Tim Horton’s Field is only 24,000, sure, but it can be expanded to 40,000 (and possibly even more for a major event like a World Cup). Since it seems unlikely that the CSA is springing this on these cities blindly, it could be that the City of Hamilton turned down the chance to bid. In fact, that's the noise that many are suggesting -- that Hamilton turned down the chance to bid. That seems short-sighted, but I’m not a Hamilton rate payer. Much of what was written about Hamilton can be extended to Winnipeg. Two new stadiums in cities that don’t traditionally get looked at to host major events….surprising, to say the least. And, once again, it appears that Winnipeg came to the conclusion on their own. There weren’t a lot of shocks among the cities included. Both Toronto and Montreal were invited to apply with two stadiums – BMO Field/Stade Saputo and The Stadium Formally Known as SkyDome/Olympic Stadium – and the rest of the cities – Ottawa, Regina, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver are basically the default cities that pop up in these conversations. The two biggest questions among the included cities might be Montreal and Calgary. The Big O is an old 43 years now. It’s hard to imagine it not being held together by duct tape and empty bottles of Old Vienna by 2026. Saputo is the smallest of the stadiums included. It would take a major renovation to get up to the required size (although with the Habs having never hosted an outdoor NHL game that might be of interest to the city). Calgary has no legitimate option other than to build something new. McMahon Stadium is already 57 years old and it’s never been called anything other than functional, even by its fans. It seems likely that Calgary has been included to add further support to an ongoing effort to completely overhaul the city’s sports infrastructure. Calgary wants to build a new hockey rink, multipurpose stadium and host the 2026 Winter Olympics. Hosting a couple extra World Cup games a few months after the big party would be the icing on that very expensive cake. Mexico only put three cities forward, so you’d imagine they plan an even split of games. That’s not in Canada’s nature – the games here will be split equally between the east and the west. View full record
  4. Hey I found a deal for a hotel room in Vancouver the room is book for Sept 5th and 6th. I'm looking for someone to split the cost with. I already booked the room it the hotel right by the pre party so I booked it early (it's now sold out) The room has 2 beds and I asked a few people I know but they all have places to stay. So if someone is looking for a hotel room I have another bed in my room. Just hoping to cut down some costs and hopefully help a fellow V. The 2 nights should cost about 200 each thought that's a damn good deal for a hotel 10 steps to where the pre party was the last 2 games, Contact me if you are interested and ill send you my cell number through a personal message on here. Jordan Kelemen
  5. Until next time, have a great soccer! @TwoSolitudesPod @24thminute @KevLaramee http://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/two-solitudes-soccer-podcast/id833616975?mt=2 http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-two-solitudes-mls-podcast http://feeds.feedburner.com/twosolitudespod OTW Studios http://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/otw-studios/id1018126433 http://feeds.feedburner.com/otwstudios http://canadiansoccernews.com http://kevinlaramee.com
  6. Having the US hordes here on Tuesday, and days of pre-match build up, and with Canada coming on Sunday, obviously helps. Prior to that, Group C wasn’t the most exciting group on paper to get fans’ juices flowing. The games turned out to be entertaining or high scoring affairs though and that also helped get a buzz generated. Now some will argue that it was a great group. It contained the World champions after all in Japan. But realistically, how many of the target audience really knew or cared about that fact? The first round of Vancouver’s group games wrapped up on Tuesday evening as the US narrowly saw off Nigeria 1-0 to top Group D and send the Africans crashing out of the tournament. A vociferous crowd of 52,123 packed into BC Place, the largest crowd for a football match since the renovations at the stadium, and one which the ‘Caps will dream could one day be a regular occurrence for MLS matches. A long term dream admittedly, as we're still a very long away from a Seattle-style attendance here. One day! The Vancouver crowds have been good in general for the tournament so far. 25,942 for a Monday afternoon/evening double header that kicked off at 4pm was sneered upon by some out east, but was excellent as far as we’re concerned. Friday’s Group C double header brought out even more, 31,441, making a combined total of 109,506 for the three first round gamedays in Vancouver. Considering who was playing, that’s been great and above my expectations. As have the matches themselves. Five games, 22 goals, some of them crackers, penalties galore. Not bad going. Sure there’s been a couple of blowouts against Ecuador, but goalfests can be entertaining too if the goals are good, which they were. Plus we got to see the excellent and entertaining dark horse, or should that be lionesses, of the tournament, Cameroon. We’ve seen some of the world’s best female players so far. Japan legend Homare Sawa delighted her supporters and long time fans of the women’s game. Switzerland’s Ramona Bachmann, put in a great performance and could still be a star of the tournament. You feel here future in the women’s game is wherever she wants it to be moving forward. Then there were the US girls, some of whom we’ll grudgingly acknowledge are amongst the world’s elite. Cameroon were a delight and their coach Enow Ngachu a real character. In Gabrielle Aboudi Onguene and Gaelle Enganamouit they have two players that could find themselves offered some lucrative deals once the tournament is over. Keeping with the African teams, I liked Nigeria centre back Onome Ebi as well. Solid, tough tackling and held off most of the US attacks. The fans we’ve spoken to have all pretty much enjoyed themselves. There’s been a couple of reports of some security buzzkill at the first Japan match, but on the whole a good time has been had by all. Well maybe not Ecuador supporters. The tournament already feels like it’s been going on forever, and there’s still four matches to be played in Vancouver – two 2nd round match-ups, a quarter-final and, of course, the final itself. The Final has already sold out and Canada’s 2nd round match-up this weekend against Switzerland will bring in the crowds and should be a cracker. If that doesn't sell-out but the US game does, then there's something wrong with the general Vancouver fanbase. It could also very realistically signal the end of Canada’s run at the tournament if we see the Swiss side of the qualifying campaign and the shooting boots from their slaughter of Ecuador. If Canada do advance, that should mean another full house at BC Place for their quarter-final game on June 27th. That seems a long way away right now mind you. Outside of the matchday experience at the stadium, the Fan Zone has proved to be a success, especially when the US games have been playing. There's been a couple of thousand fans watching games, with daily combined highs of up to 8000 in attendance. The custom built Fox Sports set has also been a talking point and a place fans have congregated. So all in all, so far so good. It's hard to see the buzz dying down, but if Canada and then the US crash out early, that may not still be the case. We'll have to see. For now, we can say the tournament has been a success. It's set to break the record for most tickets sold for a Women's World Cup and Vancouver has certainly played its part in it all. We'll leave you with some fan photos from the five first round games played at BC Place so far and a couple from the Fan Zone. And the excitement's really only just begun. Now the real tournament starts.
  7. The two big off season acquisitions of Sebastian Giovinco and Jozy Altidore connected to help Toronto FC rally to defeat the Vancouver Whitecaps 3-1 at BC Place on Saturday. The match highlighted what both squads’ new designated players were capable of. Whitecaps DP Octavio Rivero made his presence felt in his debut when he nearly scored in the ninth minute. But the Uruguayan missed the tap in from less than six yards from the net. Rivero bounced back ten minutes later by making the most of the space left by Toronto’s high back line. Defender Pa Modou Kah sent a long ball to the left flank for Rivero who needed just two touches before slotting it past keeper Joe Bendik. Vancouver controlled the pace for most of the first half and left Toronto looking slow in defense. TFC’s back line played high which gave the Whitecaps plenty of space in transition and a handful of solid scoring chances off the break. Offensively, the Reds had a difficult time of creating opportunities the final third and found themselves knocked off the ball. In the 32nd minute TFC were able to string together a sequence of clean touches in pursuit of an equalizer. Jonathan Osorio fended off fellow Canadian International Russel Teibert and slipped the ball to Giovinco. The Italian threaded a pass, which appeared to be intended for Robert Findlay, through three Whitecaps. However Findlay lost his footing which created space for Altidore to run in. The American stepped by keeper David Ousted, and knocked off a right footed shot to the bottom left of the goal. Despite the scoreline at the half, Toronto FC appeared badly out-paced. The pace of the match changed considerably in the second half in favour of the Reds as Vancouver wasn't able to break out in transition as easily as it had during the first 45. Toronto took advantage of the swing in momentum in the 59th minute. Bradley sent a ball from just inside the defending half to Benoit Cheyrou up the middle. Cheyrou found Brandon Morrow on the run on the left flank. He sent a low cross to Findlay who crept behind the Whitecaps defense to score from close range. The Whitecaps threatening presence from the first half seemed to have disappeared. In the 89th minute substitute Collen Warner fed a long range pass to the top of the box for Altidore who was hauled down in front of the net by Kah. The Gambian was shown yellow for his challenge and TFC were awarded a penalty shot. Altidore stepped up and converted a cheeky chip straight down the middle from the spot over Ousted for his second of the contest, matching his total during his time at Sunderland. This is Toronto FC’s first MLS regular season win at BC Place. Toronto continue its seven game road swing March 14th against the Columbus Crew.
  8. FIFA Elite Coach and Whitecaps Applicant; I can recommend Stephen Constantine's diligence & expertise. He is a knowledgeable, conscientious football coach of high calibre." MLS types are a dime a dozen these days Bobby.... looking for a multilingual Differentiator with global connections? Shortlist Stephen if he is still willing to visit.
  9. Reading some posts on an online article at mlssoccer.com on the subject of expansion. One comment in particular caught my mind, one reader stated that MLS expansion to Canada was a mistake and that the league should have expanded instead to other American markets. Division One soccer, such as MLS is, has been around since 1967, with a brief absence from 1985 to 1995. The arrival of the United Soccer Association (USA) and the National Professional Soccer League (NPSL) in 1967 harkened the arrival of “top flight” soccer in America, however teams in these leagues were not limited to the United States, with two teams (Toronto and Vancouver) in the USA and a second Toronto team in the NPSL, three of the twenty-two Division One teams that year were based in Canada. Even when the two leagues merged to form the North American Soccer League (NASL) in 1968, two Canadian-based teams remained. In fact, over the 17-year history of the original NASL, only two seasons did not feature Canadian-based teams (1969 and 1970). From 1971 to its final season in 1984, at least two Canadian-based teams were in the league every season (three in 1979, 1980 and 1982; and five in 1981). Despite the limited success of the Canadian members of MLS, their predecessors in the NASL actually faired quite well. On field, both Toronto (in 1976) and Vancouver (in 1979) won the Soccer Bowl Championships; and attendance-wise from 1979 onward Vancouver was consistently in the top three of attendance every year. Since entering MLS, all three Canadian teams have drawn consistently above the league average in attendance, something that cannot be said for many of the US-based teams. With stadia around 20,000 seats, they all have been drawing pretty close to capacity on most nights. The Montreal Impact even recorded the largest crowd outside Seattle last season when 60,000 watched the home town team play David Beckham and the Galaxy. I am sure there are many around the United States who believe that their leagues should stay in their cities, after all, outside of the Toronto teams in the NBA and MLB, the rest of teams in the big three are US-based. As for the NHL, US claims to that league can be easily challenged, while being founded in 1919; the first US-based team in the Canadian league was the New York Rangers in 1927. Shortly thereafter, however US-based teams became the majority. The point of the matter is this; Canadian teams in “US” Division One leagues have a proud and honourable history. Far from diluting the product or depriving more deserving markets of a franchise, these teams have proven themselves worthy and important parts of the league. One need only to look at the positive impact of the Cascadia Rivalry (featuring Portland, Seattle and Vancouver) has had on the league, or the regional rivalries that are growing between Toronto and Montreal with the Northeastern teams to appreciate the value this Canadian Trio brings to the league. Prior to the series of expansions from 2007 to 2011, which included the three Canadian teams, it is very realistic to say that MLS was stagnating, if not declining. Since the injection of the new franchises over this period MLS has found new life. Far from criticizing the league’s decision to welcome Canadian markets, which have held their own in the league, questions should be raised about certain long-standing franchises that continually underperform. Perhaps the ones keeping deserving markets out of the league are these clubs and not the ones on this side of the border.
  10. Ok, here is what I think Winter will go with based on what I have seen so far... It's a given that Frei will be in goal and that Attakora/Cann will be in front of him. I doubt De Guzman will be ready to play yet. I think Winter will want the full backs to get forward which most likely will be Omphroy and Gargan. Gargan to me is a no brainer at this point due to his experience in MLS and our lack of depth with experienced full backs at the moment. Winter will want a lot of passing of the ball and possession in the center of midfield and I believe that would be Zavarise, Bouchiba and DeRo. This is the position DeRo played successfully for Houston and this is the position he has been playing in preseason in many cases, basically playing just behind the striker and joining the attack late. On the wings I have Peterson and Martina. Winter will want them to make quick runs, cut into the center and either shoot or feed the main striker which I have has Maicon who to me is a no brainer.
  11. I was thinking about with all the recent news surrounding the caps in England(ie. paul barber signing, linked to keane, robbie savage, Haber and gage successful trials, and now the possibility of arsenal being linked with selgado), what the profile of the team is there? clearly it's not much, but is it more than other MLS clubs? I think Galaxy and Cosmos probably have the highest(relatively) profile, but could Vancouver be a close third? I'm too young to know but from what I hear vancouver was one of the highest profile clubs in Europe in the old NASL. maybe we just need a space inspired name. . .
  12. So what are the possible locations the caps are looking at besides burnaby lake? Paul Barber said they are looking for something within close proximity to the airport. I noticed on google earth that there is a huge piece of undeveloped land on the north shore of the Fraser between the Canada line bridge and Oak st. bridge(bottom of heather st.) Anyone know what this land is for(i'm assuming it's zoned for industry) or who owns it? It's been vacant for ages. It seems to me that it would be a perfect location for the caps' facility(within the city so it's close, relatively, to the downtown stadium and it's basically five minutes from the airport) any other potential sites? (I think i heard about richmond and of course Delta but I believe that deal is dead.)
  13. Ethan Gage and Randy Edwini-Bonsu talk to RedNation's Gavin Day about being part of the Whitecaps Residency Program: http://www.rednationonline.ca/whitecaps_residency_program_continuing_to_pay_dividends_apr_18_10_column.shtml
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