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Joe MacCarthy

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  1. Haha
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from Lord Bob in Canada vs New Zealand - March 24, 2018 - Friendly - IN- & POST-match thread [R]   
    Just couldn't resist
  2. Haha
  3. Thanks
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from Lofty in Herdman new head coach   
    John Herdman starting to change culture of Canadian men’s team
    Gavin Day Sportsnet.ca March 24 2018,
    SAN PEDRO DEL PINATAR, Spain – In his seven years directing the Canadian women’s soccer program, John Herdman developed a reputation for being a meticulous planner, trying to be on top of everything that can be controlled.
    An example of that came in the lead-up to the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup as Canada prepared to host the tournament. One of the things Herdman had his staff do was to time how long it would take him and his players at halftime to get into the dressing rooms at the World Cup venues. Not a second was to go to waste.
    That same attention to detail is being applied by Herdman in his early days in charge of the Canadian men’s team. While the on-field product will naturally take some time to develop, the refrain from players in the first camp held by Herdman is that objectives have been clearly communicated by the new coach.
    “He has a lot of ideas and he’s really clear. I think he’s really committed,” midfielder Samuel Piette told Sportsnet. “He knows the culture, as well, having been with the women’s side. It’s good to have a guy that was part of the program and transmitting his ideas through the men’s program.”
    Piette is emblematic of the normal Canadian player experience over the last few years, as many members of this team have dealt with a revolving door of coaches. Piette made his debut in 2012 under Stephen Hart when he was only 17. Now 23, he is playing for his seventh different Canadian men’s team coach. At least in these early days under Herdman, the players know success will only come when the team starts to expect success.
    “I think he wants us to change a bit the mentality. Before we used to accept mediocrity,” Piette said. “Failing was a normal thing for us. That’s what we want to change. He has a clear objective and clear ideas. It’s a winning mentality and being on the front foot imposing our game.”
    In Saturday’s 1-0 friendly win against New Zealand, Canada gutted through a shaky opening stretch where it easily could have found itself trailing. But with flashes from some of the younger players and some patient build-up, Canada stayed organized and earned a win in Herdman’s first match in charge.
    “We stuck to [Herdman’s game plan] the whole game,” said goal scorer Tosaint Ricketts. “As you could hear, our communication was loud on the field. Everyone knew everyone else’s job, and it helped us down there in those nervy moments. You saw we built from that in the first 15 minutes on.”
    Herdman kept the mood light in training during the week leading up to Saturday’s contest. For this training camp, he brought over some of the same staff members he used when he coached Canada’s women’s team.
    Herdman explained this camp was about the players hearing his vision for the program, getting to know him and laying down a tactical foundation. The real test as to whether the buy-in is complete from the players will be when the going gets tough while playing in challenging CONCACAF environments that have long been the bane of the Canadian program.
    “I don’t think you ever really know that until the time comes when big moments happen,” Herdman stated. “I think the big moments are coming in the CONCACAF Nations League later this year but I would say they’ve been really receptive. They’re taking on board some of the elements of the identity we’ve been shifting.”
    Canada’s early opponents in the new Nations League won’t exactly strike fear in most teams’ hearts, but given the unpredictable nature of road games in CONCACAF, there is always the possibility of a slip-up should there be a breakdown between players and coach.
    “It’s going to be interesting,” Piette offered. “I think our next meeting is in September. So, it’s going to be a long period of not being together so it’s just to get his ideas and make sure we apply them when we get together.”
    Quickly getting his team up to speed is where Herdman’s meticulous nature will be a benefit.
    Unlike the women’s game, necessity dictates the men’s side must make the most of short international windows, and get the players in and organized right away. The switch to the much shorter camps is maybe the biggest transition Herdman has had to make, but the players seem to enjoy how the camp was run.
    “Organizationally, it’s been fantastic,” veteran defender David Edgar said. “We know what we’re doing and when we’re doing it. It’s a clear vision and that’s key. We’re all on the same page and everyone has to be on the same page. I think, so far, the boys are buying into it and that’s massive for us.”
    As the players now return to their clubs, the work accomplished this week in southeastern Spain can’t get lost in a vacuum. To prevent that, the development must continue even if the Canadian team isn’t together.
    “Through the MLS season, the most important part for us is to stay connected with the group,” Herdman said. “We’ve set up online platforms that we’ve been working with the players through so that there isn’t a hiatus forgetting about our culture so the players know what’s coming. It’s not goodbye for Canada until September.”
    With victory in the bag against New Zealand in the admittedly first modest hurdle of Herdman’s tenure, Canada has now established a base and it seems some trust has been built.
    Herdman shared instructions many times during the game with goalkeeper Milan Borjan, and with a first victory and clean sheet, it appears the players do share their new coach’s vision.
    “Speaking to [them] afterwards, they’re happy with what we set up,” Herdman said. “Speaking with Samuel Piette, he says there’s just so much more to come.”
    “And I think there is.”
  4. Thanks
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from Lofty in Canada vs New Zealand - March 24, 2018 - Friendly - IN- & POST-match thread [R]   
    All Whites fall to Canada as Fritz Schmid era begins on losing note
    PHILLIP ROLLO Stuff March 25 2018
    Had Chris Wood, Winston Reid, Ryan Thomas, Stefan Marinovic and, well the list goes on, been available, the All Whites might have kicked off their new era under coach Fritz Schmid with a win.
    However, due to various injuries and club commitments, it was an inexperienced and new-look squad that took the field against Canada at an empty Pinatar Arena on Saturday (Sunday NZT), and they failed to take their chances and ended up losing 1-0.
    But for the opening 45 minutes, things were looking promising with New Zealand coming agonisingly close to scoring on three separate occasions, Michael McGlinchey hitting the post twice within a 40 second period before Jeremy Brockie had a goal disallowed for offside.
    Those missed opportunities came back to bite them as Canada eventually made the game-winning breakthrough when captain Dejan Jakovic sent a long ball through to Tosaint Ricketts, and the Toronto FC forward used his speed to get in behind Sam Brotherton before hitting a half volley past goalkeeper Max Crocombe in the 54th minute.
    Those missed opportunities came back to bite them as Canada eventually made the game-winning breakthrough when captain Dejan Jakovic sent a long ball through to Tosaint Ricketts, and the Toronto FC forward used his speed to get in behind Sam Brotherton before hitting a half volley past goalkeeper Max Crocombe in the 54th minute.
    "We have to admit that it's a defeat that hurts," said Schmid, after his first match in charge.
    "We should have at least been up by one goal in the first half. We hit two posts, we had a goal not allowed due to offside, which I can't criticise.
    "But considering we had a very young team on the pitch and we are facing an experienced squad I must say, although it hurts and maybe the players will be disappointed, there were lots of positives in this game and they realised how much we can really achieve."
    Although Schmid was disappointed to lose his first game as All Whites coach, the score was irrelevant in the grand scheme of things as he was missing 10 frontline players. Instead he used the 90 minute hit-out, and the few training sessions earlier in the week, to assess a wider group, many of whom were simply fighting for future selection.
    Four players made their debut in the game; Crocombe and Adam Mitchell, who were included in the starting 11, and Andre de Jong and Sarpreet Singh, who were released off the bench.
    It was a short-lived debut for Mitchell, who lined up outside captain Michael Boxall at right-back in a 4-2-3-1 formation. He pulled his hamstring in the 12th minute of the match when chasing a Canadian attacker down the flank and ended up being replaced by Dane Ingham.
    That was really a blow for the player who would have deserved a full game because he had a good start. He was in control and we knew he was a promising youngster and he was getting into the game," Schmid said.
    "He will have an x-ray and we will wait for the medical checks but I'd expect it to be a hamstring injury, which is of course bad for him. And it was a challenge for us because we had to change immediately in the game."
    ISPS Handa Premiership players Tim Payne and Cameron Howieson were also included in the starting 11, after impressing the coach in training, as were Marco Rojas, Clayton Lewis and Tom Doyle.
    Payne, who last featured for the national team in 2015, justified his selection with a strong performance and the Eastern Suburbs midfielder will be hard to leave out in future tours - even if he is without a professional contract.
    "They deserve a lot of credit," said of Schmid of amateurs Payne and Howieson. "At the end of the day that's what we want to achieve, to have the New Zealand players get an opportunity to prove they are up to it. They both took their chance."
    Ryan Thomas was not risked, after the midfielder arrived in camp with a slight groin injury.
    Canada 1 (Tosaint Ricketts 54') New Zealand 0 HT: 0-0
  5. Haha
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from Kent in Canada vs New Zealand - March 24, 2018 - Friendly - IN- & POST-match thread [R]   
    Just couldn't resist
  6. Like
  7. Like
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from soccer.shocker in Herdman new head coach   
    John Herdman starting to change culture of Canadian men’s team
    Gavin Day Sportsnet.ca March 24 2018,
    SAN PEDRO DEL PINATAR, Spain – In his seven years directing the Canadian women’s soccer program, John Herdman developed a reputation for being a meticulous planner, trying to be on top of everything that can be controlled.
    An example of that came in the lead-up to the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup as Canada prepared to host the tournament. One of the things Herdman had his staff do was to time how long it would take him and his players at halftime to get into the dressing rooms at the World Cup venues. Not a second was to go to waste.
    That same attention to detail is being applied by Herdman in his early days in charge of the Canadian men’s team. While the on-field product will naturally take some time to develop, the refrain from players in the first camp held by Herdman is that objectives have been clearly communicated by the new coach.
    “He has a lot of ideas and he’s really clear. I think he’s really committed,” midfielder Samuel Piette told Sportsnet. “He knows the culture, as well, having been with the women’s side. It’s good to have a guy that was part of the program and transmitting his ideas through the men’s program.”
    Piette is emblematic of the normal Canadian player experience over the last few years, as many members of this team have dealt with a revolving door of coaches. Piette made his debut in 2012 under Stephen Hart when he was only 17. Now 23, he is playing for his seventh different Canadian men’s team coach. At least in these early days under Herdman, the players know success will only come when the team starts to expect success.
    “I think he wants us to change a bit the mentality. Before we used to accept mediocrity,” Piette said. “Failing was a normal thing for us. That’s what we want to change. He has a clear objective and clear ideas. It’s a winning mentality and being on the front foot imposing our game.”
    In Saturday’s 1-0 friendly win against New Zealand, Canada gutted through a shaky opening stretch where it easily could have found itself trailing. But with flashes from some of the younger players and some patient build-up, Canada stayed organized and earned a win in Herdman’s first match in charge.
    “We stuck to [Herdman’s game plan] the whole game,” said goal scorer Tosaint Ricketts. “As you could hear, our communication was loud on the field. Everyone knew everyone else’s job, and it helped us down there in those nervy moments. You saw we built from that in the first 15 minutes on.”
    Herdman kept the mood light in training during the week leading up to Saturday’s contest. For this training camp, he brought over some of the same staff members he used when he coached Canada’s women’s team.
    Herdman explained this camp was about the players hearing his vision for the program, getting to know him and laying down a tactical foundation. The real test as to whether the buy-in is complete from the players will be when the going gets tough while playing in challenging CONCACAF environments that have long been the bane of the Canadian program.
    “I don’t think you ever really know that until the time comes when big moments happen,” Herdman stated. “I think the big moments are coming in the CONCACAF Nations League later this year but I would say they’ve been really receptive. They’re taking on board some of the elements of the identity we’ve been shifting.”
    Canada’s early opponents in the new Nations League won’t exactly strike fear in most teams’ hearts, but given the unpredictable nature of road games in CONCACAF, there is always the possibility of a slip-up should there be a breakdown between players and coach.
    “It’s going to be interesting,” Piette offered. “I think our next meeting is in September. So, it’s going to be a long period of not being together so it’s just to get his ideas and make sure we apply them when we get together.”
    Quickly getting his team up to speed is where Herdman’s meticulous nature will be a benefit.
    Unlike the women’s game, necessity dictates the men’s side must make the most of short international windows, and get the players in and organized right away. The switch to the much shorter camps is maybe the biggest transition Herdman has had to make, but the players seem to enjoy how the camp was run.
    “Organizationally, it’s been fantastic,” veteran defender David Edgar said. “We know what we’re doing and when we’re doing it. It’s a clear vision and that’s key. We’re all on the same page and everyone has to be on the same page. I think, so far, the boys are buying into it and that’s massive for us.”
    As the players now return to their clubs, the work accomplished this week in southeastern Spain can’t get lost in a vacuum. To prevent that, the development must continue even if the Canadian team isn’t together.
    “Through the MLS season, the most important part for us is to stay connected with the group,” Herdman said. “We’ve set up online platforms that we’ve been working with the players through so that there isn’t a hiatus forgetting about our culture so the players know what’s coming. It’s not goodbye for Canada until September.”
    With victory in the bag against New Zealand in the admittedly first modest hurdle of Herdman’s tenure, Canada has now established a base and it seems some trust has been built.
    Herdman shared instructions many times during the game with goalkeeper Milan Borjan, and with a first victory and clean sheet, it appears the players do share their new coach’s vision.
    “Speaking to [them] afterwards, they’re happy with what we set up,” Herdman said. “Speaking with Samuel Piette, he says there’s just so much more to come.”
    “And I think there is.”
  8. Like
  9. Like
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from toontownman in Herdman new head coach   
    John Herdman starting to change culture of Canadian men’s team
    Gavin Day Sportsnet.ca March 24 2018,
    SAN PEDRO DEL PINATAR, Spain – In his seven years directing the Canadian women’s soccer program, John Herdman developed a reputation for being a meticulous planner, trying to be on top of everything that can be controlled.
    An example of that came in the lead-up to the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup as Canada prepared to host the tournament. One of the things Herdman had his staff do was to time how long it would take him and his players at halftime to get into the dressing rooms at the World Cup venues. Not a second was to go to waste.
    That same attention to detail is being applied by Herdman in his early days in charge of the Canadian men’s team. While the on-field product will naturally take some time to develop, the refrain from players in the first camp held by Herdman is that objectives have been clearly communicated by the new coach.
    “He has a lot of ideas and he’s really clear. I think he’s really committed,” midfielder Samuel Piette told Sportsnet. “He knows the culture, as well, having been with the women’s side. It’s good to have a guy that was part of the program and transmitting his ideas through the men’s program.”
    Piette is emblematic of the normal Canadian player experience over the last few years, as many members of this team have dealt with a revolving door of coaches. Piette made his debut in 2012 under Stephen Hart when he was only 17. Now 23, he is playing for his seventh different Canadian men’s team coach. At least in these early days under Herdman, the players know success will only come when the team starts to expect success.
    “I think he wants us to change a bit the mentality. Before we used to accept mediocrity,” Piette said. “Failing was a normal thing for us. That’s what we want to change. He has a clear objective and clear ideas. It’s a winning mentality and being on the front foot imposing our game.”
    In Saturday’s 1-0 friendly win against New Zealand, Canada gutted through a shaky opening stretch where it easily could have found itself trailing. But with flashes from some of the younger players and some patient build-up, Canada stayed organized and earned a win in Herdman’s first match in charge.
    “We stuck to [Herdman’s game plan] the whole game,” said goal scorer Tosaint Ricketts. “As you could hear, our communication was loud on the field. Everyone knew everyone else’s job, and it helped us down there in those nervy moments. You saw we built from that in the first 15 minutes on.”
    Herdman kept the mood light in training during the week leading up to Saturday’s contest. For this training camp, he brought over some of the same staff members he used when he coached Canada’s women’s team.
    Herdman explained this camp was about the players hearing his vision for the program, getting to know him and laying down a tactical foundation. The real test as to whether the buy-in is complete from the players will be when the going gets tough while playing in challenging CONCACAF environments that have long been the bane of the Canadian program.
    “I don’t think you ever really know that until the time comes when big moments happen,” Herdman stated. “I think the big moments are coming in the CONCACAF Nations League later this year but I would say they’ve been really receptive. They’re taking on board some of the elements of the identity we’ve been shifting.”
    Canada’s early opponents in the new Nations League won’t exactly strike fear in most teams’ hearts, but given the unpredictable nature of road games in CONCACAF, there is always the possibility of a slip-up should there be a breakdown between players and coach.
    “It’s going to be interesting,” Piette offered. “I think our next meeting is in September. So, it’s going to be a long period of not being together so it’s just to get his ideas and make sure we apply them when we get together.”
    Quickly getting his team up to speed is where Herdman’s meticulous nature will be a benefit.
    Unlike the women’s game, necessity dictates the men’s side must make the most of short international windows, and get the players in and organized right away. The switch to the much shorter camps is maybe the biggest transition Herdman has had to make, but the players seem to enjoy how the camp was run.
    “Organizationally, it’s been fantastic,” veteran defender David Edgar said. “We know what we’re doing and when we’re doing it. It’s a clear vision and that’s key. We’re all on the same page and everyone has to be on the same page. I think, so far, the boys are buying into it and that’s massive for us.”
    As the players now return to their clubs, the work accomplished this week in southeastern Spain can’t get lost in a vacuum. To prevent that, the development must continue even if the Canadian team isn’t together.
    “Through the MLS season, the most important part for us is to stay connected with the group,” Herdman said. “We’ve set up online platforms that we’ve been working with the players through so that there isn’t a hiatus forgetting about our culture so the players know what’s coming. It’s not goodbye for Canada until September.”
    With victory in the bag against New Zealand in the admittedly first modest hurdle of Herdman’s tenure, Canada has now established a base and it seems some trust has been built.
    Herdman shared instructions many times during the game with goalkeeper Milan Borjan, and with a first victory and clean sheet, it appears the players do share their new coach’s vision.
    “Speaking to [them] afterwards, they’re happy with what we set up,” Herdman said. “Speaking with Samuel Piette, he says there’s just so much more to come.”
    “And I think there is.”
  10. Haha
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from mowe in Canada vs New Zealand - March 24, 2018 - Friendly - IN- & POST-match thread [R]   
    Just couldn't resist
  11. Like
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  13. Haha
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from Lofty in Canada vs New Zealand - March 24, 2018 - Friendly - IN- & POST-match thread [R]   
    Just couldn't resist
  14. Haha
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from Moldy9 in Canada vs New Zealand - March 24, 2018 - Friendly - IN- & POST-match thread [R]   
    Just couldn't resist
  15. Haha
  16. Like
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from Zem in Canada vs New Zealand - March 24, 2018 - Friendly - IN- & POST-match thread [R]   
    Just couldn't resist
  17. Haha
  18. Like
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from red card in Canada vs New Zealand - March 24, 2018 - Friendly - IN- & POST-match thread [R]   
    Just couldn't resist
  19. Like
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from Lennon in Canada vs New Zealand - March 24, 2018 - Friendly - IN- & POST-match thread [R]   
    Just couldn't resist
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    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from Lofty in 2026 WC Bid?   
    No soccer for you! Inside the government's fight with FIFA
    Mike Smyth The Province March 17, 2018
    Columnist Mike Smyth writes about the B.C. government's challenge to FIFA that caused Vancouver to be dropped as a potential World Cup host city.
    The opportunity to host World Cup soccer games was a dream scenario for Vancouver fans who hoped “the beautiful game” would visit our beautiful city in 2026.
    But when B.C. Place officials sat down to analyze the contract terms demanded by FIFA — the corruption-plagued world governing body for soccer — the dream turned into a financial nightmare.
    Now I can tell you some inside details of the proposed deal, which unraveled last week after the B.C. government demanded clarity on costs and renegotiation of key points.
    B.C. Place is owned by the provincial government and managed by the B.C. Pavilion Corp., a Crown agency known as Pavco.
    A “risk analysis” document prepared by Pavco officials outlined an astonishing series of non-negotiable contract terms from FIFA that would have burned taxpayers to a crisp.
    They included a requirement that B.C. Place install not just one temporary natural-grass playing surface on top of the stadium’s existing artificial turf (installed just three years ago at a cost of $1.3 million).
    The contract demanded a second “contingency pitch” just in case something went wrong with the first grass field and a new one had to be installed on short notice.
    FIFA not only demanded two grass fields for B.C. Place, they also demanded two electricity supplies to the stadium in case of a power failure.
    A “second separate source of power supply for the stadium” would be “entirely and wholly the responsibility of the stadium and host city,” the risk assessment said.
    “Pavco flagged that for us right at the beginning — they have a single power source,” Tourism Minister Lisa Beare told me.
    The cost of a backup power supply — be it gas-powered generators or a separate B.C. Hydro line — was listed as “unknown” in the assessment.
    Then there were the security costs, notorious for going over-budget. A prime example: Security for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver was originally budgeted at $175 million and ended up costing over $1 billion.
    “That was a huge concern for us,” Beare said. “We couldn’t get any firm requirements or cost estimates.”
    Stoking the fears of the government was the 2014 World Cup experience of Brazil, which spent over $900 million on security, including a massive video-surveillance system and training on potential chemical and radiological terror attacks.
    Keep in mind Vancouver was only in line to get two or three soccer games as part of a unified bid to host the World Cup by Canada, the United States and Mexico.
    But, even though the number of games was small, FIFA still demanded “exclusive use” of B.C. Place for up to two months, requiring all other events to be cancelled or postponed.
    During the “exclusive use period,” FIFA insisted on a “clean stadium clause” banning all non-authorized advertising and commercial activity — and not just within the confines of B.C. Place itself.
    The ban included “prohibition of any promotional, public-relations, religious, political or commercial advertising of any kind in, on, above, around or about the stadium without prior written approval by FIFA,” the assessment said.
    “When they were using words like ‘around’ and ‘about’ the stadium, we sought clarity on that and the bid committee could not provide it,” Beare said.
    “It would have made us responsible for activities that happened outside the stadium,” she added, saying the government was concerned about policing the activities of businesses near B.C. Place.
    If you’re wondering whether all these costs would have been offset by a share of World Cup ticket sales or TV rights — forget it.
    “An exceptionally broad and almost universal ownership of commercial rights with respect to the competition” would remain exclusively with FIFA, the assessment said, including “media rights, marketing rights and ticketing.”
    As B.C. taxpayers absorbed all the costs — and FIFA scooped all the World Cup profits — FIFA also demanded special treatment under B.C. taxation and labour laws.
    “The FIFA World Cup represents an event of national importance and public interest, which justifies the granting of a tax exemption,” said a FIFA document entitled “Overview of Government Guarantees.”
    The tax exemption would also apply to FIFA service providers, contractors “and certain designated individuals.” The same document also required the government to grant FIFA “exemption from labour law” and allow “unrestricted import and export of all foreign currencies.”
    As if that’s not enough, FIFA also wanted the right to change the terms of the agreement after it was signed, with any cost increases borne by taxpayers.
    In response to all these contract demands and uncosted liabilities, the B.C. government sent a letter to the three-country Unified Bid Committee.
    The letter said B.C. would support the bid on three conditions: Production of a detailed business plan showing all projected costs, federal-government responsibility for security and an indemnity to protect B.C. taxpayers from any cost overruns.
    The conditions were not met, and Vancouver was dropped as a potential host city.
    “We would have loved to have hosted these World Cup games and we tried hard to make it happen,” Beare said. “But we were unable to get the security we needed for taxpayers.”
    The opposition Liberals slammed the governing NDP for failing to deliver.
    “The government pulled the rug out from under soccer fans and the tourism industry,” said Liberal MLA Jas Johal.
    But others applauded the B.C. government — and the cities of Chicago, Phoenix and Minneapolis, which also rejected the contract demands — for standing up to FIFA.
    “It’s a wise decision,” said Andrew Jennings, the British reporter credited with exposing FIFA corruption that led to U.S. charges of wire fraud, racketeering and money laundering in 2015. “More and more governments are saying ‘Thanks, but no thanks’ to FIFA. The era of the shakedown is over.”
  23. Like
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from ted in 2026 WC Bid?   
    No soccer for you! Inside the government's fight with FIFA
    Mike Smyth The Province March 17, 2018
    Columnist Mike Smyth writes about the B.C. government's challenge to FIFA that caused Vancouver to be dropped as a potential World Cup host city.
    The opportunity to host World Cup soccer games was a dream scenario for Vancouver fans who hoped “the beautiful game” would visit our beautiful city in 2026.
    But when B.C. Place officials sat down to analyze the contract terms demanded by FIFA — the corruption-plagued world governing body for soccer — the dream turned into a financial nightmare.
    Now I can tell you some inside details of the proposed deal, which unraveled last week after the B.C. government demanded clarity on costs and renegotiation of key points.
    B.C. Place is owned by the provincial government and managed by the B.C. Pavilion Corp., a Crown agency known as Pavco.
    A “risk analysis” document prepared by Pavco officials outlined an astonishing series of non-negotiable contract terms from FIFA that would have burned taxpayers to a crisp.
    They included a requirement that B.C. Place install not just one temporary natural-grass playing surface on top of the stadium’s existing artificial turf (installed just three years ago at a cost of $1.3 million).
    The contract demanded a second “contingency pitch” just in case something went wrong with the first grass field and a new one had to be installed on short notice.
    FIFA not only demanded two grass fields for B.C. Place, they also demanded two electricity supplies to the stadium in case of a power failure.
    A “second separate source of power supply for the stadium” would be “entirely and wholly the responsibility of the stadium and host city,” the risk assessment said.
    “Pavco flagged that for us right at the beginning — they have a single power source,” Tourism Minister Lisa Beare told me.
    The cost of a backup power supply — be it gas-powered generators or a separate B.C. Hydro line — was listed as “unknown” in the assessment.
    Then there were the security costs, notorious for going over-budget. A prime example: Security for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver was originally budgeted at $175 million and ended up costing over $1 billion.
    “That was a huge concern for us,” Beare said. “We couldn’t get any firm requirements or cost estimates.”
    Stoking the fears of the government was the 2014 World Cup experience of Brazil, which spent over $900 million on security, including a massive video-surveillance system and training on potential chemical and radiological terror attacks.
    Keep in mind Vancouver was only in line to get two or three soccer games as part of a unified bid to host the World Cup by Canada, the United States and Mexico.
    But, even though the number of games was small, FIFA still demanded “exclusive use” of B.C. Place for up to two months, requiring all other events to be cancelled or postponed.
    During the “exclusive use period,” FIFA insisted on a “clean stadium clause” banning all non-authorized advertising and commercial activity — and not just within the confines of B.C. Place itself.
    The ban included “prohibition of any promotional, public-relations, religious, political or commercial advertising of any kind in, on, above, around or about the stadium without prior written approval by FIFA,” the assessment said.
    “When they were using words like ‘around’ and ‘about’ the stadium, we sought clarity on that and the bid committee could not provide it,” Beare said.
    “It would have made us responsible for activities that happened outside the stadium,” she added, saying the government was concerned about policing the activities of businesses near B.C. Place.
    If you’re wondering whether all these costs would have been offset by a share of World Cup ticket sales or TV rights — forget it.
    “An exceptionally broad and almost universal ownership of commercial rights with respect to the competition” would remain exclusively with FIFA, the assessment said, including “media rights, marketing rights and ticketing.”
    As B.C. taxpayers absorbed all the costs — and FIFA scooped all the World Cup profits — FIFA also demanded special treatment under B.C. taxation and labour laws.
    “The FIFA World Cup represents an event of national importance and public interest, which justifies the granting of a tax exemption,” said a FIFA document entitled “Overview of Government Guarantees.”
    The tax exemption would also apply to FIFA service providers, contractors “and certain designated individuals.” The same document also required the government to grant FIFA “exemption from labour law” and allow “unrestricted import and export of all foreign currencies.”
    As if that’s not enough, FIFA also wanted the right to change the terms of the agreement after it was signed, with any cost increases borne by taxpayers.
    In response to all these contract demands and uncosted liabilities, the B.C. government sent a letter to the three-country Unified Bid Committee.
    The letter said B.C. would support the bid on three conditions: Production of a detailed business plan showing all projected costs, federal-government responsibility for security and an indemnity to protect B.C. taxpayers from any cost overruns.
    The conditions were not met, and Vancouver was dropped as a potential host city.
    “We would have loved to have hosted these World Cup games and we tried hard to make it happen,” Beare said. “But we were unable to get the security we needed for taxpayers.”
    The opposition Liberals slammed the governing NDP for failing to deliver.
    “The government pulled the rug out from under soccer fans and the tourism industry,” said Liberal MLA Jas Johal.
    But others applauded the B.C. government — and the cities of Chicago, Phoenix and Minneapolis, which also rejected the contract demands — for standing up to FIFA.
    “It’s a wise decision,” said Andrew Jennings, the British reporter credited with exposing FIFA corruption that led to U.S. charges of wire fraud, racketeering and money laundering in 2015. “More and more governments are saying ‘Thanks, but no thanks’ to FIFA. The era of the shakedown is over.”
  24. Thanks
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from CNMNTPERUELIGIBLE in Herdman new head coach   
    Start at 59:00
  25. Haha
    Joe MacCarthy got a reaction from grande in CONCACAF Nations League   
    Hire her to play, she's probably tougher than half the men.
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