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The Beaver 2.0

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  1. Thanks
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Bertuzzi44 in Ralph Priso   
    Begs the question: What was the other chat site? 😉
  2. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from El Hombre in Ralph Priso   
    Begs the question: What was the other chat site? 😉
  3. Haha
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Ruffian in Ralph Priso   
    Begs the question: What was the other chat site? 😉
  4. Haha
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from dyslexic nam in Ralph Priso   
    Begs the question: What was the other chat site? 😉
  5. Haha
    The Beaver 2.0 reacted to Gian-Luca in Ralph Priso   
    For a second I thought I was making my normal Freudian slip every time I see a listing for that movie "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" I always see "Fantastic Breasts and Where to Find Them" and then realize my mistake. But no, in this case my eyesight is correct.

  6. Haha
    The Beaver 2.0 reacted to Bison44 in Ballou Tabla   
    Tabla scores in extra time.  He really needed that to get us to shut up about his mental state etc.  
  7. Thanks
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Trois Reds in Ballou Tabla   
    And because this is how things often happen, I was just scanning the CBC.ca homepage for news on the damned virus and I came across  this article about giftedness, written by someone who has struggled because of expectations associated with that term, among other things:
    https://www.cbc.ca/parents/learning/view/i-grew-up-gifted-but-my-life-didnt-turn-out-the-way-i-expected
     
     
  8. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Trois Reds in Ballou Tabla   
    Hard to say what is really going on with Ballou, but I wonder if his situation is akin to that of my son, or any other kid who is diagnosed as "Gifted". Gifted people have significantly higher IQs (they test in the top 98th, 99th percentiles in several cognitive areas) than that of the average population, but as they and their peers age, the intellectual advantages of being Gifted tend to narrow, not because the Gifted kid has experienced a decline in raw intellectual ability but because other factors start to become more important to an individual's success, things like work habits, social and familial support, organizational tools and raw desire. In short, average smart kids--i.e. not Gifted kids--who have a passion for a subject and work hard tend to perform as well, if not better than, Gifted kids who could give a rats ass about a subject or who've never developed the work habits and org. skills. And what happens to these Gifted kids who find out, usually in high school, that they actually have to work hard to get what they want? Well, they start to think they aren't really smart, and their self-esteem plummets.  For their entire lives they've equated intelligence with the relative ease with which they can understand concepts and develop skills. We did not teach our son to read: We read to him all the time and one day he started reading to us. He was only 4 and a half!
    If this gives us any insight into a player like Ballou, then what might it say? If Ballou had been the most talented player in his age group for many years, and then touted as some sort of generational talent, with guys like Drogba blowing sunshine up his ass, and then he turns pro and discovers he's mostly riding the pine, heads to Barca where he is but one of many, many talented young players, and then he sees little game time over the two or three years he is in Spain, I would imagine that his self-esteem took several kicks in the teeth.  And while we all know that the only way for Ballou to turn things around is for him to accept the fact that dedication and hard work are vital to success, anyone who preaches this to him will only highlight--in his mind--that maybe he was not talented enough from the beginning. When I look at my son and his struggles, or from what I read about other Gifted kids, the way forward is all about finding one's passion and then building a framework to pursue that passion.  Hard work is not really hard work when you love what you are doing and you understand the purpose of that hard work.  Again, not knowing Ballou's psychology at all, it seems to me that he doesn't really want a career in football. Maybe he was good as a kid but his real passion lies somewhere else.  Hell, I am brilliant at customer service but I do not want a career as a retail clerk. (Done that. I was damned good. Never again.)
    If choosing Canada over the Ivory Coast plays into this in any way, then my assumption is that Ballou lost confidence in himself and picked Canada because he felt the IC was out of reach.  It makes no sense to me that choosing Canada and giving up on the IC was the cause of his current situation.  That seems assbackwards, does it not? 
    Ballou reminds me of Wynn Belotte in this instance. But I've a feeling that Ballou can still turn this around, if only because whereas Belotte seemed to be a raging egomaniac I suspect Ballou is a deeply introspective, introverted type (my people!), which means that it is far more likely that Ballou will accept reality (i.e. hard work and dedication = success).  But it will come down to one thing: does he really want it? Those who enjoy sustained success tend to exhibit a mindset that might seem at odds with itself but that has far too many shining examples to ignore: one must be humble about what they are doing AND simultaneously audacious about their ability to achieve their goals. Look at Davies.  He is full of humility and audacity, at the same time.  He is driven, passionate AND hard working and humble. I suspect Ballou has been humbled, but now he needs to understand the importance of humility (i.e. you don't know shit so pay attention to your coaches and work hard and develop good habits) while he also believes he can be a superstar. I wonder, too, if he has the right support system. I wish him well, in whatever he chooses to do. I hope it is football.
     
     
  9. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 reacted to costarg in Ballou Tabla   
    Showed well in 35 minutes vs Philly last night. Drew fouls like the D-men knew he was dangerous.  Moved the ball nicely, looked confident, put in honest defensive work.  I want to say we're starting to see it, but I'll wait a little while.  
  10. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from The Real Marc in Ballou Tabla   
    Great insight! You see this too with kids heading off to the big city for university, straight out of high school. One of my classmates in high school got a great scholarship to a university 500 miles from home, in a big city, at a point in her life when she'd never been away from her family for more than two weeks at any time. She wasn't a super shy person, but reserved enough that she struggled to adapt to her new environment and returned home after one term, never to return to university again.  The big questions: Was she simply not ready? Or would she have ever been ready?  
  11. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from yothat2 in Ballou Tabla   
    Yes, and to help build work habits and an understanding of what it means to be a professional. Confidence is key, especially for a guy like Ballou who seems more reserved and introverted. 
  12. Thanks
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from MtlMario in Ballou Tabla   
    And because this is how things often happen, I was just scanning the CBC.ca homepage for news on the damned virus and I came across  this article about giftedness, written by someone who has struggled because of expectations associated with that term, among other things:
    https://www.cbc.ca/parents/learning/view/i-grew-up-gifted-but-my-life-didnt-turn-out-the-way-i-expected
     
     
  13. Thanks
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from MtlMario in Ballou Tabla   
    Hard to say what is really going on with Ballou, but I wonder if his situation is akin to that of my son, or any other kid who is diagnosed as "Gifted". Gifted people have significantly higher IQs (they test in the top 98th, 99th percentiles in several cognitive areas) than that of the average population, but as they and their peers age, the intellectual advantages of being Gifted tend to narrow, not because the Gifted kid has experienced a decline in raw intellectual ability but because other factors start to become more important to an individual's success, things like work habits, social and familial support, organizational tools and raw desire. In short, average smart kids--i.e. not Gifted kids--who have a passion for a subject and work hard tend to perform as well, if not better than, Gifted kids who could give a rats ass about a subject or who've never developed the work habits and org. skills. And what happens to these Gifted kids who find out, usually in high school, that they actually have to work hard to get what they want? Well, they start to think they aren't really smart, and their self-esteem plummets.  For their entire lives they've equated intelligence with the relative ease with which they can understand concepts and develop skills. We did not teach our son to read: We read to him all the time and one day he started reading to us. He was only 4 and a half!
    If this gives us any insight into a player like Ballou, then what might it say? If Ballou had been the most talented player in his age group for many years, and then touted as some sort of generational talent, with guys like Drogba blowing sunshine up his ass, and then he turns pro and discovers he's mostly riding the pine, heads to Barca where he is but one of many, many talented young players, and then he sees little game time over the two or three years he is in Spain, I would imagine that his self-esteem took several kicks in the teeth.  And while we all know that the only way for Ballou to turn things around is for him to accept the fact that dedication and hard work are vital to success, anyone who preaches this to him will only highlight--in his mind--that maybe he was not talented enough from the beginning. When I look at my son and his struggles, or from what I read about other Gifted kids, the way forward is all about finding one's passion and then building a framework to pursue that passion.  Hard work is not really hard work when you love what you are doing and you understand the purpose of that hard work.  Again, not knowing Ballou's psychology at all, it seems to me that he doesn't really want a career in football. Maybe he was good as a kid but his real passion lies somewhere else.  Hell, I am brilliant at customer service but I do not want a career as a retail clerk. (Done that. I was damned good. Never again.)
    If choosing Canada over the Ivory Coast plays into this in any way, then my assumption is that Ballou lost confidence in himself and picked Canada because he felt the IC was out of reach.  It makes no sense to me that choosing Canada and giving up on the IC was the cause of his current situation.  That seems assbackwards, does it not? 
    Ballou reminds me of Wynn Belotte in this instance. But I've a feeling that Ballou can still turn this around, if only because whereas Belotte seemed to be a raging egomaniac I suspect Ballou is a deeply introspective, introverted type (my people!), which means that it is far more likely that Ballou will accept reality (i.e. hard work and dedication = success).  But it will come down to one thing: does he really want it? Those who enjoy sustained success tend to exhibit a mindset that might seem at odds with itself but that has far too many shining examples to ignore: one must be humble about what they are doing AND simultaneously audacious about their ability to achieve their goals. Look at Davies.  He is full of humility and audacity, at the same time.  He is driven, passionate AND hard working and humble. I suspect Ballou has been humbled, but now he needs to understand the importance of humility (i.e. you don't know shit so pay attention to your coaches and work hard and develop good habits) while he also believes he can be a superstar. I wonder, too, if he has the right support system. I wish him well, in whatever he chooses to do. I hope it is football.
     
     
  14. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Obinna in Ballou Tabla   
    Perhaps! Again, I don't really know his personal life, but family plays a big role in the lives of young people too.  And one cannot ignore the power of personality. Davies and Tabla do not have the same personality by any stretch of the imagination.  
    As the legendary Vancouver business tycoon Jimmy Pattison always says: "You gotta wanna."
  15. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Kadenge in Ballou Tabla   
    Perhaps! Again, I don't really know his personal life, but family plays a big role in the lives of young people too.  And one cannot ignore the power of personality. Davies and Tabla do not have the same personality by any stretch of the imagination.  
    As the legendary Vancouver business tycoon Jimmy Pattison always says: "You gotta wanna."
  16. Thanks
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from HochelagaFC in Ballou Tabla   
    Hard to say what is really going on with Ballou, but I wonder if his situation is akin to that of my son, or any other kid who is diagnosed as "Gifted". Gifted people have significantly higher IQs (they test in the top 98th, 99th percentiles in several cognitive areas) than that of the average population, but as they and their peers age, the intellectual advantages of being Gifted tend to narrow, not because the Gifted kid has experienced a decline in raw intellectual ability but because other factors start to become more important to an individual's success, things like work habits, social and familial support, organizational tools and raw desire. In short, average smart kids--i.e. not Gifted kids--who have a passion for a subject and work hard tend to perform as well, if not better than, Gifted kids who could give a rats ass about a subject or who've never developed the work habits and org. skills. And what happens to these Gifted kids who find out, usually in high school, that they actually have to work hard to get what they want? Well, they start to think they aren't really smart, and their self-esteem plummets.  For their entire lives they've equated intelligence with the relative ease with which they can understand concepts and develop skills. We did not teach our son to read: We read to him all the time and one day he started reading to us. He was only 4 and a half!
    If this gives us any insight into a player like Ballou, then what might it say? If Ballou had been the most talented player in his age group for many years, and then touted as some sort of generational talent, with guys like Drogba blowing sunshine up his ass, and then he turns pro and discovers he's mostly riding the pine, heads to Barca where he is but one of many, many talented young players, and then he sees little game time over the two or three years he is in Spain, I would imagine that his self-esteem took several kicks in the teeth.  And while we all know that the only way for Ballou to turn things around is for him to accept the fact that dedication and hard work are vital to success, anyone who preaches this to him will only highlight--in his mind--that maybe he was not talented enough from the beginning. When I look at my son and his struggles, or from what I read about other Gifted kids, the way forward is all about finding one's passion and then building a framework to pursue that passion.  Hard work is not really hard work when you love what you are doing and you understand the purpose of that hard work.  Again, not knowing Ballou's psychology at all, it seems to me that he doesn't really want a career in football. Maybe he was good as a kid but his real passion lies somewhere else.  Hell, I am brilliant at customer service but I do not want a career as a retail clerk. (Done that. I was damned good. Never again.)
    If choosing Canada over the Ivory Coast plays into this in any way, then my assumption is that Ballou lost confidence in himself and picked Canada because he felt the IC was out of reach.  It makes no sense to me that choosing Canada and giving up on the IC was the cause of his current situation.  That seems assbackwards, does it not? 
    Ballou reminds me of Wynn Belotte in this instance. But I've a feeling that Ballou can still turn this around, if only because whereas Belotte seemed to be a raging egomaniac I suspect Ballou is a deeply introspective, introverted type (my people!), which means that it is far more likely that Ballou will accept reality (i.e. hard work and dedication = success).  But it will come down to one thing: does he really want it? Those who enjoy sustained success tend to exhibit a mindset that might seem at odds with itself but that has far too many shining examples to ignore: one must be humble about what they are doing AND simultaneously audacious about their ability to achieve their goals. Look at Davies.  He is full of humility and audacity, at the same time.  He is driven, passionate AND hard working and humble. I suspect Ballou has been humbled, but now he needs to understand the importance of humility (i.e. you don't know shit so pay attention to your coaches and work hard and develop good habits) while he also believes he can be a superstar. I wonder, too, if he has the right support system. I wish him well, in whatever he chooses to do. I hope it is football.
     
     
  17. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from The Real Marc in Ballou Tabla   
    Hard to say what is really going on with Ballou, but I wonder if his situation is akin to that of my son, or any other kid who is diagnosed as "Gifted". Gifted people have significantly higher IQs (they test in the top 98th, 99th percentiles in several cognitive areas) than that of the average population, but as they and their peers age, the intellectual advantages of being Gifted tend to narrow, not because the Gifted kid has experienced a decline in raw intellectual ability but because other factors start to become more important to an individual's success, things like work habits, social and familial support, organizational tools and raw desire. In short, average smart kids--i.e. not Gifted kids--who have a passion for a subject and work hard tend to perform as well, if not better than, Gifted kids who could give a rats ass about a subject or who've never developed the work habits and org. skills. And what happens to these Gifted kids who find out, usually in high school, that they actually have to work hard to get what they want? Well, they start to think they aren't really smart, and their self-esteem plummets.  For their entire lives they've equated intelligence with the relative ease with which they can understand concepts and develop skills. We did not teach our son to read: We read to him all the time and one day he started reading to us. He was only 4 and a half!
    If this gives us any insight into a player like Ballou, then what might it say? If Ballou had been the most talented player in his age group for many years, and then touted as some sort of generational talent, with guys like Drogba blowing sunshine up his ass, and then he turns pro and discovers he's mostly riding the pine, heads to Barca where he is but one of many, many talented young players, and then he sees little game time over the two or three years he is in Spain, I would imagine that his self-esteem took several kicks in the teeth.  And while we all know that the only way for Ballou to turn things around is for him to accept the fact that dedication and hard work are vital to success, anyone who preaches this to him will only highlight--in his mind--that maybe he was not talented enough from the beginning. When I look at my son and his struggles, or from what I read about other Gifted kids, the way forward is all about finding one's passion and then building a framework to pursue that passion.  Hard work is not really hard work when you love what you are doing and you understand the purpose of that hard work.  Again, not knowing Ballou's psychology at all, it seems to me that he doesn't really want a career in football. Maybe he was good as a kid but his real passion lies somewhere else.  Hell, I am brilliant at customer service but I do not want a career as a retail clerk. (Done that. I was damned good. Never again.)
    If choosing Canada over the Ivory Coast plays into this in any way, then my assumption is that Ballou lost confidence in himself and picked Canada because he felt the IC was out of reach.  It makes no sense to me that choosing Canada and giving up on the IC was the cause of his current situation.  That seems assbackwards, does it not? 
    Ballou reminds me of Wynn Belotte in this instance. But I've a feeling that Ballou can still turn this around, if only because whereas Belotte seemed to be a raging egomaniac I suspect Ballou is a deeply introspective, introverted type (my people!), which means that it is far more likely that Ballou will accept reality (i.e. hard work and dedication = success).  But it will come down to one thing: does he really want it? Those who enjoy sustained success tend to exhibit a mindset that might seem at odds with itself but that has far too many shining examples to ignore: one must be humble about what they are doing AND simultaneously audacious about their ability to achieve their goals. Look at Davies.  He is full of humility and audacity, at the same time.  He is driven, passionate AND hard working and humble. I suspect Ballou has been humbled, but now he needs to understand the importance of humility (i.e. you don't know shit so pay attention to your coaches and work hard and develop good habits) while he also believes he can be a superstar. I wonder, too, if he has the right support system. I wish him well, in whatever he chooses to do. I hope it is football.
     
     
  18. Thanks
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Obinna in Ballou Tabla   
    Hard to say what is really going on with Ballou, but I wonder if his situation is akin to that of my son, or any other kid who is diagnosed as "Gifted". Gifted people have significantly higher IQs (they test in the top 98th, 99th percentiles in several cognitive areas) than that of the average population, but as they and their peers age, the intellectual advantages of being Gifted tend to narrow, not because the Gifted kid has experienced a decline in raw intellectual ability but because other factors start to become more important to an individual's success, things like work habits, social and familial support, organizational tools and raw desire. In short, average smart kids--i.e. not Gifted kids--who have a passion for a subject and work hard tend to perform as well, if not better than, Gifted kids who could give a rats ass about a subject or who've never developed the work habits and org. skills. And what happens to these Gifted kids who find out, usually in high school, that they actually have to work hard to get what they want? Well, they start to think they aren't really smart, and their self-esteem plummets.  For their entire lives they've equated intelligence with the relative ease with which they can understand concepts and develop skills. We did not teach our son to read: We read to him all the time and one day he started reading to us. He was only 4 and a half!
    If this gives us any insight into a player like Ballou, then what might it say? If Ballou had been the most talented player in his age group for many years, and then touted as some sort of generational talent, with guys like Drogba blowing sunshine up his ass, and then he turns pro and discovers he's mostly riding the pine, heads to Barca where he is but one of many, many talented young players, and then he sees little game time over the two or three years he is in Spain, I would imagine that his self-esteem took several kicks in the teeth.  And while we all know that the only way for Ballou to turn things around is for him to accept the fact that dedication and hard work are vital to success, anyone who preaches this to him will only highlight--in his mind--that maybe he was not talented enough from the beginning. When I look at my son and his struggles, or from what I read about other Gifted kids, the way forward is all about finding one's passion and then building a framework to pursue that passion.  Hard work is not really hard work when you love what you are doing and you understand the purpose of that hard work.  Again, not knowing Ballou's psychology at all, it seems to me that he doesn't really want a career in football. Maybe he was good as a kid but his real passion lies somewhere else.  Hell, I am brilliant at customer service but I do not want a career as a retail clerk. (Done that. I was damned good. Never again.)
    If choosing Canada over the Ivory Coast plays into this in any way, then my assumption is that Ballou lost confidence in himself and picked Canada because he felt the IC was out of reach.  It makes no sense to me that choosing Canada and giving up on the IC was the cause of his current situation.  That seems assbackwards, does it not? 
    Ballou reminds me of Wynn Belotte in this instance. But I've a feeling that Ballou can still turn this around, if only because whereas Belotte seemed to be a raging egomaniac I suspect Ballou is a deeply introspective, introverted type (my people!), which means that it is far more likely that Ballou will accept reality (i.e. hard work and dedication = success).  But it will come down to one thing: does he really want it? Those who enjoy sustained success tend to exhibit a mindset that might seem at odds with itself but that has far too many shining examples to ignore: one must be humble about what they are doing AND simultaneously audacious about their ability to achieve their goals. Look at Davies.  He is full of humility and audacity, at the same time.  He is driven, passionate AND hard working and humble. I suspect Ballou has been humbled, but now he needs to understand the importance of humility (i.e. you don't know shit so pay attention to your coaches and work hard and develop good habits) while he also believes he can be a superstar. I wonder, too, if he has the right support system. I wish him well, in whatever he chooses to do. I hope it is football.
     
     
  19. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 reacted to SpursFlu in Ballou Tabla   
    I think the observations above are interesting and very accurate. I think thats why its important for young players in many cases to spend a lengthy period of time in 1 professional environment surrounded by positive mentors and consistenly playing. It doesn't have to be the most glamorous league but its great for confidence and building that foundation 
  20. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 reacted to Bison44 in Ballou Tabla   
    So he throws away his shot at Barca because of feeling let down choosing Canada??  Thats a very strange conclusion to draw.  Either way...he's 21, he should be getting his head screwed on straight by now and needs to buckle down or he wont even be a pro soccer player.  That should be something to keep him motivated.  
  21. Haha
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Cheeta in The Importance of Alphonso Davies   
    Not sure if I was watching the same broadcast but I was getting Bear Grylls and Arnold Schwartzenoogie
     
  22. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Nello in The Importance of Alphonso Davies   
    Not sure if I was watching the same broadcast but I was getting Bear Grylls and Arnold Schwartzenoogie
     
  23. Haha
    The Beaver 2.0 reacted to CanadaFan123 in Richmond "Richie" Laryea   
    Also, I know it’s a fan vote but Will Johnson didn’t win goal of the week but won goal of the year in 2008. 
     
    Yeah his reasoning here:
    MAN OF THE MATCH: Laryea fueled the second-half comeback with penetrating runs down the right flank. But Pozuelo deserves the honor after scoring in his third straight match and continuing to be vital to TFC's recent rise.
     
    So he didn’t win man of the MATCH.. because of the context of Pozuelos previous performances.... expert analysis there.
  24. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Trois Reds in Richmond "Richie" Laryea   
    Predictable! Pozuelo was very good but Laryea made all 3 goals happen. 
  25. Like
    The Beaver 2.0 got a reaction from Obinna in Richmond "Richie" Laryea   
    Predictable! Pozuelo was very good but Laryea made all 3 goals happen. 
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