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Rintaran

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Everything posted by Rintaran

  1. Latest interview with Kempenfelt Crew now available here: https://northernstartingeleven.com/kempenfelt-crew/ Not really a tonne of new information, but some fun stuff (potential team names, mascot, colours, etc) in addition to the more specific questions (facility, players, etc).
  2. Fraser Aird to Valour is now confirmed officially: https://canpl.ca/article/valour-fc-inks-ex-glasgow-rangers-winger-fraser-aird
  3. I think it's more like offsetting costs than allowing new spending, at least, in regards to player wages. As for the other elements in Mahith's list, well, those are all free game, and building an academy provides direct access to players that could potentially fill in when there's an injury on that short roster CPL has... That said, I'd be surprised if Forge didn't have something worked out with Hamilton United Elite, the L1O club that's adding a men's team this year.
  4. @stuart.mac has provided a quick run-down on Pacific's two imports from the Fury: https://northernstartingeleven.com/right-profile-pacific-fc-add-dixon-and-meilleur-giguere/ He speaks very highly of both players, and I look forward to seeing how they integrate in the squad.
  5. Massive signings for the team. Unless something unfortunate happens during pre-season, this team should be competing at the top of the table this year.
  6. @rob.notenboom has released his latest article on BCL1: https://northernstartingeleven.com/b-c-league-1-approaching-critical-moment/ He's interviewed Peter Schaad concerning the league. Although there's a fair bit of info throughout, he provides a handy summary:
  7. The Canadian soccer landscape is going through a serious metamorphosis. The last decade has seen the launch of regional Division 3 leagues Première Ligue de Soccer du Québec and League 1 Ontario in 2012 and 2013 respectively. In 2019 the Canadian Premier League played its first season. For male soccer players wishing to play professionally, these are encouraging developments. Prior to the existence of these leagues, the odds were significantly stacked against players trying to make the leap from youth to professional as the gap in playing level was simply too large. It is a gap that long time soccer broadcaster and current Marketing and Communications Officer for BC Soccer Peter Schaad knows all too well. Over much of the past year, Schaad and his BC Soccer cohorts have been working steadily to address that issue for BC players. The idea of a Division 3 regional league like PLSQ and L1O was included in BC Soccer’s 2016 strategic plan. However at the time the ‘Regional Tier 3 League’ as it was called gained insufficient interest from potential participating clubs and the idea was shelved. But the start of the Canadian Premier League breathed new life into BC League 1 and it was revived. --- Read more on the NSXI Network.
  8. The Canadian soccer landscape is going through a serious metamorphosis. The last decade has seen the launch of regional Division 3 leagues Première Ligue de Soccer du Québec and League 1 Ontario in 2012 and 2013 respectively. In 2019 the Canadian Premier League played its first season. For male soccer players wishing to play professionally, these are encouraging developments. Prior to the existence of these leagues, the odds were significantly stacked against players trying to make the leap from youth to professional as the gap in playing level was simply too large. It is a gap that long time soccer broadcaster and current Marketing and Communications Officer for BC Soccer Peter Schaad knows all too well. Over much of the past year, Schaad and his BC Soccer cohorts have been working steadily to address that issue for BC players. The idea of a Division 3 regional league like PLSQ and L1O was included in BC Soccer’s 2016 strategic plan. However at the time the ‘Regional Tier 3 League’ as it was called gained insufficient interest from potential participating clubs and the idea was shelved. But the start of the Canadian Premier League breathed new life into BC League 1 and it was revived. --- Read more on the NSXI Network. View full record
  9. The Spanish Press is chattering about this now: https://www.palco23.com/clubes/el-atletico-de-madrid-ultima-la-compra-de-una-franquicia-en-la-canadian-premier-league.html https://as.com/futbol/2020/01/17/primera/1579270668_904063.html?id_externo_rsoc=comp_tw
  10. I don't think they will. @ted has put forth some pretty good reasoning on this one, but I can add 2 more reasons: 1) The current format is "neat". It looks tidy, has a decent rationale, and comes to the conclusion the CSA wants. 2) The CSA is not exactly known for going the extra mile. It's made, they aren't going to do the work all over again.
  11. I might, just might, be able to swing an Ottawa vs Pacific road trip. My wife's been wanting to do a trip to Ottawa since we got back at this end of the country, and this just might be enough for us to forget about the costs (and headaches with toddlers) and just do it.
  12. I like Dominion FC as well. Definitely right in the naming convention. Despite this, I think they're going with Atletico Ottawa.
  13. This is my understanding of the situation. It'd be higher than D3, but lower than D1, but really just a sort of tournament for testing the waters.
  14. Langley-born Joel Waterman officially made history on Tuesday afternoon, as he became the first player to make the jump from the Canadian Premier League to Major League Soccer, joining the Montreal Impact for a fee reported to be in the $100k region. Waterman also became the first player sold by a CPL team for a transfer fee, giving us an example of how beneficial the new Canadian first division can be for young footballers in this country. Despite being the only player to make the jump to MLS so far, Joel Waterman wasn’t necessarily considered one of the best players in the CanPL. In fact, OneSoccer ranked him just 43rd on their year-end list of the top 50 players in the league. Waterman has many strong qualities though, and if an MLS team was convinced by his quality, then maybe he was somebody we were overlooking all season long. Let’s take an in-depth look at what Waterman does and doesn’t bring to the table for the Montreal Impact: His versatility is very impressive, and is certainly one of the main reasons Montreal signed him. Joel Waterman is a centre-back first and foremost, and while he can play other positions on the pitch, his versatility within the centre-back position on its own is rather impressive. As you know, there are multiple different formations used regularly in all levels of football, and pretty much all of those formations use either 2 centre-backs (a back 4) or 3 (a back 3). The roles played by centre-backs in these 2 formations vary quite a bit more than you’d expect, as do the areas of the pitch that they cover. --- Read more on the NSXI Network
  15. Langley-born Joel Waterman officially made history on Tuesday afternoon, as he became the first player to make the jump from the Canadian Premier League to Major League Soccer, joining the Montreal Impact for a fee reported to be in the $100k region. Waterman also became the first player sold by a CPL team for a transfer fee, giving us an example of how beneficial the new Canadian first division can be for young footballers in this country. Despite being the only player to make the jump to MLS so far, Joel Waterman wasn’t necessarily considered one of the best players in the CanPL. In fact, OneSoccer ranked him just 43rd on their year-end list of the top 50 players in the league. Waterman has many strong qualities though, and if an MLS team was convinced by his quality, then maybe he was somebody we were overlooking all season long. Let’s take an in-depth look at what Waterman does and doesn’t bring to the table for the Montreal Impact: His versatility is very impressive, and is certainly one of the main reasons Montreal signed him. Joel Waterman is a centre-back first and foremost, and while he can play other positions on the pitch, his versatility within the centre-back position on its own is rather impressive. As you know, there are multiple different formations used regularly in all levels of football, and pretty much all of those formations use either 2 centre-backs (a back 4) or 3 (a back 3). The roles played by centre-backs in these 2 formations vary quite a bit more than you’d expect, as do the areas of the pitch that they cover. --- Read more on the NSXI Network View full record
  16. Probably not for this year. Ottawa may be deemed ineligible this year as it was not an existing club at the end of 2019 (or some other excuse). Rollins seems to be of that opinion, and has given us a firm end-date:
  17. Not sure if there's much of a connection, but this just came up on my IG:
  18. That's pretty good money. Wasn't really expecting transfer fees that high coming out of the 1st year.
  19. Now that, is an interesting possibility. Given that there's a split season, and that Ottawa can't play in the 2020 Canadian Championship, a Fall-season start could be possible.
  20. Because silly season isn't silly enough: Personally, I think it's pretty late to put a team in place for 2020, but anything could happen I guess.
  21. That would be very interesting to see. I also think if OneSoccer obtains the rights, it would work very well if they finally negotiated the launch of their cable channel (which, according to Larson, is still the plan). The two could dovetail nicely, with their OTT service benefiting from traditional access. I just hope they don't end up being only on Bell, Rogers, or Shaw...
  22. According to Larson, an offer has been made, but no word officially yet. Bustos would be a great addition to the squad, and I'm optimistic we'll see Pacific competing at the top of the table if this ends up being true.
  23. Thomas Nef interviews Ahinga Selemani, a Canadian forward with Hawkes Bay United. Watch here: https://northernstartingeleven.com/canucks-abroad-interview-series-episode-3-with-ahinga-selemani/
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