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DigzTFC

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  1. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from camchatkaFC in CPL General   
    I listened to Richard Peddie at a conference I attended.  It was part of his book launch a few years ago.  The way he described MLS/TFC was focused on creating Enterprise Value for MLSE and he knew very little about soccer.  He pointed to the underlying demographics of Toronto and participation of amateur soccer to substantiate the investment.  I believe it was a $10M MLS entrance fee at the time which was one or two bad hockey contracts so very little risk.  Plus, the stadium was largely financed by the various levels of government.  It was essentially a no-brainer given that MLSE could leverage it's existing departments (ticketing, marketing, F&B etc.) in what was traditionally the off season of the the NHL/NBA.
    To bring this back to CPL.  The smaller size teams (30 people traveling), the smaller/modular stadiums (5-6K) and selling players abroad are a huge advantages for soccer over football.  The CFL cannot expand without the will of all levels of governments financing a new stadium in a new market.  Federal funds are only accessed through an event like the commonwealth games, summer Olympics, world cup etc. To build  stadiums sizable for a CFL team would require $200+M in funding.  Moreover, these events tend to be held in cities where these stadiums already exist which means the funds are used renovate and update existing infrastructure. 
    The soccer stadiums we are talking about a far more palatable to municipal governments and can be largely financed or rented (if modular) privately with accommodations on taxation and levies from the municipality.  That's why CPL's future is so bright.  Selling a player every few years abroad is just icing on the cake.  I think there is a very good business case the secondary and tertiary markets in Canada like Halifax.
    https://www.thesudburystar.com/2013/01/18/new-arena-could-cost-as-much-as-60m-report-2
    As a person with some real estate development experience, I can tell you that the cost of construction has gone up immensely over the last 10 years.  That's why modular is an attractive option, not only for it's flexibility in right sizing the market and financing options, but it mitigates the risk of increasing construction costs and long term maintenance issues.  Just my opinion though.
     
  2. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Yohan in Noble Okello   
    All great points and fair feedback.  To be clear, I'm not advocating for personal struggle just seems to be that this type of person preserver more often than not. But that could be my media bias, where these personal struggles are highlighted for a good story vs. a kid that was just good and made the first team.
    So I did a little research on Armas' time with Redbulls (2015-2020). 
    Marsh was the head coach from 2015-2018 and Armas as assistant coach during that time. It was the same high-pressure tactical system.
    During that window of time Redbulls produced - Miazga, Tyler Adams.  I'm sure there are others.
    It's possible due to the nature of the press style, as others have outlined, that younger legs are necessary in order to maintain the press.  Therefore, younger players get a chance to play, develop and showcase at the pro level faster than tactics that require methodical buildup that require experience.
    So, does that mean we will see younger players play sooner? I think so.  Does that mean they will develop faster? I think so.  Does it mean that we will TFC will take a step back competitively?  I'm not sure.  With Bradley stabilizing the midfield and Gonzalez in the back it maybe a smoother transition so long as goals can be produced. 
    It also stands to reason that Armas is a 2-3 year fix until Bradley takes over the coaching reigns.
    A lot of this season will be predicated on Altidore's health/performance.  My thoughts lead me to believe that TFC will take a step back if Peruzza, Akinola, Mullins, Achara or a potential new DP don't produce goals as I don't think there is enough goals production available from the wings and the midfield.  But if Nelson, Rutty, Akinola or Peruzza break out...it's game on.
  3. Like
    DigzTFC reacted to Macksam in Noble Okello   
    I agree about the players needing to be more aggressive, I still remember my Jay Chapman rant from a few years ago about how he thought it was acceptable to receive a pass, dribble a couple of yards before lateral passing to someone else when he made his first or second senior  appearance for TFC.
    Obviously Okello is not like that but he should watch Ajax's game today and see Gravenberch, how he's all over the place, putting a leg into everything within a 5 yard radius of him. 
    As for the necessity of loan arrangements for up and comers? I don't know. There are clubs in Europe that have even more infrastructure than TFC and kids make it through fine. Personal struggle like fathering a child, supporting one's family at a young age do develop one's character but you can't really rely on such things consistently, and I'm not sure a stint in a foreign land is really in the same ball park.  Most of these kids won't have much struggle to deal with, and that's neither here or there really. TFC just need to do a better job integrating the academy players into the first team and that's all down to modifying the club's structure. 
  4. Thanks
    DigzTFC got a reaction from SoccMan in CPL General   
    I listened to Richard Peddie at a conference I attended.  It was part of his book launch a few years ago.  The way he described MLS/TFC was focused on creating Enterprise Value for MLSE and he knew very little about soccer.  He pointed to the underlying demographics of Toronto and participation of amateur soccer to substantiate the investment.  I believe it was a $10M MLS entrance fee at the time which was one or two bad hockey contracts so very little risk.  Plus, the stadium was largely financed by the various levels of government.  It was essentially a no-brainer given that MLSE could leverage it's existing departments (ticketing, marketing, F&B etc.) in what was traditionally the off season of the the NHL/NBA.
    To bring this back to CPL.  The smaller size teams (30 people traveling), the smaller/modular stadiums (5-6K) and selling players abroad are a huge advantages for soccer over football.  The CFL cannot expand without the will of all levels of governments financing a new stadium in a new market.  Federal funds are only accessed through an event like the commonwealth games, summer Olympics, world cup etc. To build  stadiums sizable for a CFL team would require $200+M in funding.  Moreover, these events tend to be held in cities where these stadiums already exist which means the funds are used renovate and update existing infrastructure. 
    The soccer stadiums we are talking about a far more palatable to municipal governments and can be largely financed or rented (if modular) privately with accommodations on taxation and levies from the municipality.  That's why CPL's future is so bright.  Selling a player every few years abroad is just icing on the cake.  I think there is a very good business case the secondary and tertiary markets in Canada like Halifax.
    https://www.thesudburystar.com/2013/01/18/new-arena-could-cost-as-much-as-60m-report-2
    As a person with some real estate development experience, I can tell you that the cost of construction has gone up immensely over the last 10 years.  That's why modular is an attractive option, not only for it's flexibility in right sizing the market and financing options, but it mitigates the risk of increasing construction costs and long term maintenance issues.  Just my opinion though.
     
  5. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from nfitz in CPL General   
    I listened to Richard Peddie at a conference I attended.  It was part of his book launch a few years ago.  The way he described MLS/TFC was focused on creating Enterprise Value for MLSE and he knew very little about soccer.  He pointed to the underlying demographics of Toronto and participation of amateur soccer to substantiate the investment.  I believe it was a $10M MLS entrance fee at the time which was one or two bad hockey contracts so very little risk.  Plus, the stadium was largely financed by the various levels of government.  It was essentially a no-brainer given that MLSE could leverage it's existing departments (ticketing, marketing, F&B etc.) in what was traditionally the off season of the the NHL/NBA.
    To bring this back to CPL.  The smaller size teams (30 people traveling), the smaller/modular stadiums (5-6K) and selling players abroad are a huge advantages for soccer over football.  The CFL cannot expand without the will of all levels of governments financing a new stadium in a new market.  Federal funds are only accessed through an event like the commonwealth games, summer Olympics, world cup etc. To build  stadiums sizable for a CFL team would require $200+M in funding.  Moreover, these events tend to be held in cities where these stadiums already exist which means the funds are used renovate and update existing infrastructure. 
    The soccer stadiums we are talking about a far more palatable to municipal governments and can be largely financed or rented (if modular) privately with accommodations on taxation and levies from the municipality.  That's why CPL's future is so bright.  Selling a player every few years abroad is just icing on the cake.  I think there is a very good business case the secondary and tertiary markets in Canada like Halifax.
    https://www.thesudburystar.com/2013/01/18/new-arena-could-cost-as-much-as-60m-report-2
    As a person with some real estate development experience, I can tell you that the cost of construction has gone up immensely over the last 10 years.  That's why modular is an attractive option, not only for it's flexibility in right sizing the market and financing options, but it mitigates the risk of increasing construction costs and long term maintenance issues.  Just my opinion though.
     
  6. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from johnyb in CPL General   
    I listened to Richard Peddie at a conference I attended.  It was part of his book launch a few years ago.  The way he described MLS/TFC was focused on creating Enterprise Value for MLSE and he knew very little about soccer.  He pointed to the underlying demographics of Toronto and participation of amateur soccer to substantiate the investment.  I believe it was a $10M MLS entrance fee at the time which was one or two bad hockey contracts so very little risk.  Plus, the stadium was largely financed by the various levels of government.  It was essentially a no-brainer given that MLSE could leverage it's existing departments (ticketing, marketing, F&B etc.) in what was traditionally the off season of the the NHL/NBA.
    To bring this back to CPL.  The smaller size teams (30 people traveling), the smaller/modular stadiums (5-6K) and selling players abroad are a huge advantages for soccer over football.  The CFL cannot expand without the will of all levels of governments financing a new stadium in a new market.  Federal funds are only accessed through an event like the commonwealth games, summer Olympics, world cup etc. To build  stadiums sizable for a CFL team would require $200+M in funding.  Moreover, these events tend to be held in cities where these stadiums already exist which means the funds are used renovate and update existing infrastructure. 
    The soccer stadiums we are talking about a far more palatable to municipal governments and can be largely financed or rented (if modular) privately with accommodations on taxation and levies from the municipality.  That's why CPL's future is so bright.  Selling a player every few years abroad is just icing on the cake.  I think there is a very good business case the secondary and tertiary markets in Canada like Halifax.
    https://www.thesudburystar.com/2013/01/18/new-arena-could-cost-as-much-as-60m-report-2
    As a person with some real estate development experience, I can tell you that the cost of construction has gone up immensely over the last 10 years.  That's why modular is an attractive option, not only for it's flexibility in right sizing the market and financing options, but it mitigates the risk of increasing construction costs and long term maintenance issues.  Just my opinion though.
     
  7. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Unnamed Trialist in CPL General   
    I listened to Richard Peddie at a conference I attended.  It was part of his book launch a few years ago.  The way he described MLS/TFC was focused on creating Enterprise Value for MLSE and he knew very little about soccer.  He pointed to the underlying demographics of Toronto and participation of amateur soccer to substantiate the investment.  I believe it was a $10M MLS entrance fee at the time which was one or two bad hockey contracts so very little risk.  Plus, the stadium was largely financed by the various levels of government.  It was essentially a no-brainer given that MLSE could leverage it's existing departments (ticketing, marketing, F&B etc.) in what was traditionally the off season of the the NHL/NBA.
    To bring this back to CPL.  The smaller size teams (30 people traveling), the smaller/modular stadiums (5-6K) and selling players abroad are a huge advantages for soccer over football.  The CFL cannot expand without the will of all levels of governments financing a new stadium in a new market.  Federal funds are only accessed through an event like the commonwealth games, summer Olympics, world cup etc. To build  stadiums sizable for a CFL team would require $200+M in funding.  Moreover, these events tend to be held in cities where these stadiums already exist which means the funds are used renovate and update existing infrastructure. 
    The soccer stadiums we are talking about a far more palatable to municipal governments and can be largely financed or rented (if modular) privately with accommodations on taxation and levies from the municipality.  That's why CPL's future is so bright.  Selling a player every few years abroad is just icing on the cake.  I think there is a very good business case the secondary and tertiary markets in Canada like Halifax.
    https://www.thesudburystar.com/2013/01/18/new-arena-could-cost-as-much-as-60m-report-2
    As a person with some real estate development experience, I can tell you that the cost of construction has gone up immensely over the last 10 years.  That's why modular is an attractive option, not only for it's flexibility in right sizing the market and financing options, but it mitigates the risk of increasing construction costs and long term maintenance issues.  Just my opinion though.
     
  8. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Ivan in CPL General   
    I listened to Richard Peddie at a conference I attended.  It was part of his book launch a few years ago.  The way he described MLS/TFC was focused on creating Enterprise Value for MLSE and he knew very little about soccer.  He pointed to the underlying demographics of Toronto and participation of amateur soccer to substantiate the investment.  I believe it was a $10M MLS entrance fee at the time which was one or two bad hockey contracts so very little risk.  Plus, the stadium was largely financed by the various levels of government.  It was essentially a no-brainer given that MLSE could leverage it's existing departments (ticketing, marketing, F&B etc.) in what was traditionally the off season of the the NHL/NBA.
    To bring this back to CPL.  The smaller size teams (30 people traveling), the smaller/modular stadiums (5-6K) and selling players abroad are a huge advantages for soccer over football.  The CFL cannot expand without the will of all levels of governments financing a new stadium in a new market.  Federal funds are only accessed through an event like the commonwealth games, summer Olympics, world cup etc. To build  stadiums sizable for a CFL team would require $200+M in funding.  Moreover, these events tend to be held in cities where these stadiums already exist which means the funds are used renovate and update existing infrastructure. 
    The soccer stadiums we are talking about a far more palatable to municipal governments and can be largely financed or rented (if modular) privately with accommodations on taxation and levies from the municipality.  That's why CPL's future is so bright.  Selling a player every few years abroad is just icing on the cake.  I think there is a very good business case the secondary and tertiary markets in Canada like Halifax.
    https://www.thesudburystar.com/2013/01/18/new-arena-could-cost-as-much-as-60m-report-2
    As a person with some real estate development experience, I can tell you that the cost of construction has gone up immensely over the last 10 years.  That's why modular is an attractive option, not only for it's flexibility in right sizing the market and financing options, but it mitigates the risk of increasing construction costs and long term maintenance issues.  Just my opinion though.
     
  9. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from CanadianSoccerFan in CPL General   
    I listened to Richard Peddie at a conference I attended.  It was part of his book launch a few years ago.  The way he described MLS/TFC was focused on creating Enterprise Value for MLSE and he knew very little about soccer.  He pointed to the underlying demographics of Toronto and participation of amateur soccer to substantiate the investment.  I believe it was a $10M MLS entrance fee at the time which was one or two bad hockey contracts so very little risk.  Plus, the stadium was largely financed by the various levels of government.  It was essentially a no-brainer given that MLSE could leverage it's existing departments (ticketing, marketing, F&B etc.) in what was traditionally the off season of the the NHL/NBA.
    To bring this back to CPL.  The smaller size teams (30 people traveling), the smaller/modular stadiums (5-6K) and selling players abroad are a huge advantages for soccer over football.  The CFL cannot expand without the will of all levels of governments financing a new stadium in a new market.  Federal funds are only accessed through an event like the commonwealth games, summer Olympics, world cup etc. To build  stadiums sizable for a CFL team would require $200+M in funding.  Moreover, these events tend to be held in cities where these stadiums already exist which means the funds are used renovate and update existing infrastructure. 
    The soccer stadiums we are talking about a far more palatable to municipal governments and can be largely financed or rented (if modular) privately with accommodations on taxation and levies from the municipality.  That's why CPL's future is so bright.  Selling a player every few years abroad is just icing on the cake.  I think there is a very good business case the secondary and tertiary markets in Canada like Halifax.
    https://www.thesudburystar.com/2013/01/18/new-arena-could-cost-as-much-as-60m-report-2
    As a person with some real estate development experience, I can tell you that the cost of construction has gone up immensely over the last 10 years.  That's why modular is an attractive option, not only for it's flexibility in right sizing the market and financing options, but it mitigates the risk of increasing construction costs and long term maintenance issues.  Just my opinion though.
     
  10. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Trois Reds in CPL General   
    I listened to Richard Peddie at a conference I attended.  It was part of his book launch a few years ago.  The way he described MLS/TFC was focused on creating Enterprise Value for MLSE and he knew very little about soccer.  He pointed to the underlying demographics of Toronto and participation of amateur soccer to substantiate the investment.  I believe it was a $10M MLS entrance fee at the time which was one or two bad hockey contracts so very little risk.  Plus, the stadium was largely financed by the various levels of government.  It was essentially a no-brainer given that MLSE could leverage it's existing departments (ticketing, marketing, F&B etc.) in what was traditionally the off season of the the NHL/NBA.
    To bring this back to CPL.  The smaller size teams (30 people traveling), the smaller/modular stadiums (5-6K) and selling players abroad are a huge advantages for soccer over football.  The CFL cannot expand without the will of all levels of governments financing a new stadium in a new market.  Federal funds are only accessed through an event like the commonwealth games, summer Olympics, world cup etc. To build  stadiums sizable for a CFL team would require $200+M in funding.  Moreover, these events tend to be held in cities where these stadiums already exist which means the funds are used renovate and update existing infrastructure. 
    The soccer stadiums we are talking about a far more palatable to municipal governments and can be largely financed or rented (if modular) privately with accommodations on taxation and levies from the municipality.  That's why CPL's future is so bright.  Selling a player every few years abroad is just icing on the cake.  I think there is a very good business case the secondary and tertiary markets in Canada like Halifax.
    https://www.thesudburystar.com/2013/01/18/new-arena-could-cost-as-much-as-60m-report-2
    As a person with some real estate development experience, I can tell you that the cost of construction has gone up immensely over the last 10 years.  That's why modular is an attractive option, not only for it's flexibility in right sizing the market and financing options, but it mitigates the risk of increasing construction costs and long term maintenance issues.  Just my opinion though.
     
  11. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Bison44 in CPL General   
    I listened to Richard Peddie at a conference I attended.  It was part of his book launch a few years ago.  The way he described MLS/TFC was focused on creating Enterprise Value for MLSE and he knew very little about soccer.  He pointed to the underlying demographics of Toronto and participation of amateur soccer to substantiate the investment.  I believe it was a $10M MLS entrance fee at the time which was one or two bad hockey contracts so very little risk.  Plus, the stadium was largely financed by the various levels of government.  It was essentially a no-brainer given that MLSE could leverage it's existing departments (ticketing, marketing, F&B etc.) in what was traditionally the off season of the the NHL/NBA.
    To bring this back to CPL.  The smaller size teams (30 people traveling), the smaller/modular stadiums (5-6K) and selling players abroad are a huge advantages for soccer over football.  The CFL cannot expand without the will of all levels of governments financing a new stadium in a new market.  Federal funds are only accessed through an event like the commonwealth games, summer Olympics, world cup etc. To build  stadiums sizable for a CFL team would require $200+M in funding.  Moreover, these events tend to be held in cities where these stadiums already exist which means the funds are used renovate and update existing infrastructure. 
    The soccer stadiums we are talking about a far more palatable to municipal governments and can be largely financed or rented (if modular) privately with accommodations on taxation and levies from the municipality.  That's why CPL's future is so bright.  Selling a player every few years abroad is just icing on the cake.  I think there is a very good business case the secondary and tertiary markets in Canada like Halifax.
    https://www.thesudburystar.com/2013/01/18/new-arena-could-cost-as-much-as-60m-report-2
    As a person with some real estate development experience, I can tell you that the cost of construction has gone up immensely over the last 10 years.  That's why modular is an attractive option, not only for it's flexibility in right sizing the market and financing options, but it mitigates the risk of increasing construction costs and long term maintenance issues.  Just my opinion though.
     
  12. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from johnyb in CPL General   
    https://canpl.ca/article/concacaf-president-montagliani-looking-forward-to-cpls-encore-performance-in-2021
    Montagliani, a 55-year-old native of B.C., was impressed with the CPL’s staging of The Island Games, especially when you consider more established leagues around the world struggled to deal with the pandemic.
    “The (CPL’s) second season, like every other league in the world, hit the brakes pretty hard last year. But then what impressed me was how the leadership of the league pivoted quite quickly into creating a bubble in PEI and having The Island Games,” Montagliani told CanPL.ca.
    “A lot of leagues in the world weren’t able to do that; leagues that have been around for a long time just cancelled their seasons. The French league just said, ‘We’re done.’ So, that was impressive for me, and the games were quite good at The Island Games, as well.”
    Montagliani, who is also a vice president of FIFA, is looking forward to seeing what the CPL can do for an encore in 2021, as the league and the rest of the sporting world continue to deal with COVID-19.
    “We’re on the precipice of a third season and (the CPL) building on that, so it’s pretty hard not to give the league an overall grade of an ‘A’ after its first two seasons,” Montagliani stated
  13. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Ivan in CPL General   
    I apologize in advance for a bit of a diatribe.  A mix of commentary and areas of improvement of CPL.
    Kah's comments about the lack of experience of WCQ U23 team made me reflect more on the state of CPL.  My observations aren't quantified so its a bit anecdotal and easily challenged.  I think Kah's assertion is correct that lack of experience hurt our chances against Mexico.  I also think being out of season is a huge factor and without addressing that issue, it's extremely hopeful for the next U23 cycle to have all in-season European based players.
    I have done research on Belgium FA and how they improved their program and how CPL can play more than a way for players to get game experience.
    https://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/jun/06/belgium-blueprint-gave-birth-golden-generation-world-cup-
    1) Each CPL club should adopt the same playing structure (ex 4-3-3) as the National Team
    - Benefits, alignment with National Team tactics so if NT camps are short and there are not many NT games to prepare for tournaments, these youth players will be able to fit into the system tactically.   This is a huge advantage as very few FAs have adopted this approach and clubs and coaches do their own structures depending on the opponent.  We also have a small league and its possible to implement this.
    2) The CPL league schedule has very tight turnarounds which means only tactics and fitness can be  coached.  There cannot be any skill development done.  However, CPL does have a long off-season.  All Canadian players should be assigned a high performance individual development plan.  Those can be executed through private operators of through National Team development outlets like the Ontario Soccer Association or loan agreements with European based clubs (ex Zator etc).  We need our players to improve skill wise and our long off season can be an advantage rather than a detriment.
    3) Each team should have a U18 Youth Team that focuses on skill development and tactics.  If you look at the Belgium NT players most if not all were starting in their league at 18 and had two solid years of playing before being sold abroad.  We are so slow to integrate our youth in Canada.  It puts us at a huge disadvantage in my opinion.  That could be due to a skill gap but we need more 16-18 year old starters.  You could look at a league rule that gives 1.5x minutes for players under 18 toward the time allocation required for U21 players.  Just a thought.  There should also be an award with cash incentive given to the club that has the most U21 minutes.  $100-200K or something like that.
    4) There has been very little turnover of Canadians in the league on the best teams or players are staying in the league and going to different clubs.  Stability is good but it also leads to bit of stagnation.  If players aren't being developed outside of the games (this is my base assumption) the improvement will be slight and slow and the only way to improve the league is to bring in higher wages and better internationals.  MLS did this and its unclear if this strengthens the NT Program.  Not sure how to address this. Thoughts?
    5) We need more Canadian players in key positions on the field.  To often, we see the international spots used for the spine of the team (FW, CM, CB).  It happens in MLS and it appears to be happening in the CPL to a degree.  These are the positions we need for NT Program.  With 7 Domestic of the 11 starters including U-Sport Draft picks, this can become problematic.  Not sure how to address this. Thoughts?
    6) We need to see more loans from European based Canadians that have early release clauses to return to their teams in time for the season of close of the transfer window. European based Canadians are dying for games as well and this could be an excellent way to develop them in conjunction with their current club.  Tristan Borges being loaned back to Forge is the only example that comes to mind.  We do this for U-Sport players why not euro clubs.
    7) We need players from the MLS academies getting minutes in CPL on deals where they can be recalled like the AHL.  I know this impacts the appearance of the league but the unfortunate reality is most of these players in the MLS academy are the best talent and they aren't getting enough games with the 1st team or 2nd Team.  Ex. Shaffelburg.    What happens in MLS squanders too much talent by not playing them. 
    The most interesting things to watch in season 3 of the CPL are:
    1) Is that standard of play better?
    2) Which existing players go better?
    3) Which young players emerged?
  14. Like
    DigzTFC reacted to SoccMan in CPL General   
    Yes having Canadian players in key positions would be a positive but you can’t really mandate that , all you can do is just allow less imports . In terms of telling individuals teams to play a certain style no no and no . Let each team decide their style of play or each head coach . Yes the CPL is there to develop players but in the end you have to leave styles of play to the individual clubs and coaches .
  15. Like
    DigzTFC reacted to Bison44 in CPL General   
    Just a couple of quick points, it was Belgium youth teams that all decided to adopt the senior system (4-3-3)?  Well I couldnt tell you what our national team system is..do we have one??  And CPL is a pro league, I dont know how you could get them all to play the same system, its not like academy teams that have only one job.. to funnel kids to the senior side.  
  16. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from cronaldo7 in CPL General   
    Really good point by Pa-Madou Kah
    Olympic qualifying difference between Canada and Mexico:
    Mexico Starters had 1,400 Games of Experience, 1,200 Games Started with 179,000 min played Canada Starters had 280 Games of Experience, 189 Games Started with 17,000 min played Mexico had 88 Senior Caps in Experience Canada had 31 Senior Caps in Experience He thinks that CPL is the perfect platform to address the experience gap.  I don't disagree with him
     
  17. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from dyslexic nam in CPL General   
    https://canpl.ca/article/concacaf-president-montagliani-looking-forward-to-cpls-encore-performance-in-2021
    Montagliani, a 55-year-old native of B.C., was impressed with the CPL’s staging of The Island Games, especially when you consider more established leagues around the world struggled to deal with the pandemic.
    “The (CPL’s) second season, like every other league in the world, hit the brakes pretty hard last year. But then what impressed me was how the leadership of the league pivoted quite quickly into creating a bubble in PEI and having The Island Games,” Montagliani told CanPL.ca.
    “A lot of leagues in the world weren’t able to do that; leagues that have been around for a long time just cancelled their seasons. The French league just said, ‘We’re done.’ So, that was impressive for me, and the games were quite good at The Island Games, as well.”
    Montagliani, who is also a vice president of FIFA, is looking forward to seeing what the CPL can do for an encore in 2021, as the league and the rest of the sporting world continue to deal with COVID-19.
    “We’re on the precipice of a third season and (the CPL) building on that, so it’s pretty hard not to give the league an overall grade of an ‘A’ after its first two seasons,” Montagliani stated
  18. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from CDNFootballer in CPL General   
    https://canpl.ca/article/concacaf-president-montagliani-looking-forward-to-cpls-encore-performance-in-2021
    Montagliani, a 55-year-old native of B.C., was impressed with the CPL’s staging of The Island Games, especially when you consider more established leagues around the world struggled to deal with the pandemic.
    “The (CPL’s) second season, like every other league in the world, hit the brakes pretty hard last year. But then what impressed me was how the leadership of the league pivoted quite quickly into creating a bubble in PEI and having The Island Games,” Montagliani told CanPL.ca.
    “A lot of leagues in the world weren’t able to do that; leagues that have been around for a long time just cancelled their seasons. The French league just said, ‘We’re done.’ So, that was impressive for me, and the games were quite good at The Island Games, as well.”
    Montagliani, who is also a vice president of FIFA, is looking forward to seeing what the CPL can do for an encore in 2021, as the league and the rest of the sporting world continue to deal with COVID-19.
    “We’re on the precipice of a third season and (the CPL) building on that, so it’s pretty hard not to give the league an overall grade of an ‘A’ after its first two seasons,” Montagliani stated
  19. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from johnyb in CPL General   
    Really good point by Pa-Madou Kah
    Olympic qualifying difference between Canada and Mexico:
    Mexico Starters had 1,400 Games of Experience, 1,200 Games Started with 179,000 min played Canada Starters had 280 Games of Experience, 189 Games Started with 17,000 min played Mexico had 88 Senior Caps in Experience Canada had 31 Senior Caps in Experience He thinks that CPL is the perfect platform to address the experience gap.  I don't disagree with him
     
  20. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Kent in CPL General   
    Really good point by Pa-Madou Kah
    Olympic qualifying difference between Canada and Mexico:
    Mexico Starters had 1,400 Games of Experience, 1,200 Games Started with 179,000 min played Canada Starters had 280 Games of Experience, 189 Games Started with 17,000 min played Mexico had 88 Senior Caps in Experience Canada had 31 Senior Caps in Experience He thinks that CPL is the perfect platform to address the experience gap.  I don't disagree with him
     
  21. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Ansem in CPL General   
    Really good point by Pa-Madou Kah
    Olympic qualifying difference between Canada and Mexico:
    Mexico Starters had 1,400 Games of Experience, 1,200 Games Started with 179,000 min played Canada Starters had 280 Games of Experience, 189 Games Started with 17,000 min played Mexico had 88 Senior Caps in Experience Canada had 31 Senior Caps in Experience He thinks that CPL is the perfect platform to address the experience gap.  I don't disagree with him
     
  22. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from NVsoccer in CPL General   
    Really good point by Pa-Madou Kah
    Olympic qualifying difference between Canada and Mexico:
    Mexico Starters had 1,400 Games of Experience, 1,200 Games Started with 179,000 min played Canada Starters had 280 Games of Experience, 189 Games Started with 17,000 min played Mexico had 88 Senior Caps in Experience Canada had 31 Senior Caps in Experience He thinks that CPL is the perfect platform to address the experience gap.  I don't disagree with him
     
  23. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Dominic94 in CPL General   
    Really good point by Pa-Madou Kah
    Olympic qualifying difference between Canada and Mexico:
    Mexico Starters had 1,400 Games of Experience, 1,200 Games Started with 179,000 min played Canada Starters had 280 Games of Experience, 189 Games Started with 17,000 min played Mexico had 88 Senior Caps in Experience Canada had 31 Senior Caps in Experience He thinks that CPL is the perfect platform to address the experience gap.  I don't disagree with him
     
  24. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Dominic94 in Lucas Dias - Sporting CP   
    I googled Lucas Dias and found he was an alumni of Sporting FC Toronto.
    I clicked on Alumni:
    https://sportingfctoronto.com/alumni/daniel-costa/
    Does anyone know who Daniel Costa or have context to the academy he is part of? Is he Canadian?
  25. Like
    DigzTFC got a reaction from Aird25 in CPL General   
    Really good point by Pa-Madou Kah
    Olympic qualifying difference between Canada and Mexico:
    Mexico Starters had 1,400 Games of Experience, 1,200 Games Started with 179,000 min played Canada Starters had 280 Games of Experience, 189 Games Started with 17,000 min played Mexico had 88 Senior Caps in Experience Canada had 31 Senior Caps in Experience He thinks that CPL is the perfect platform to address the experience gap.  I don't disagree with him
     
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