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SF

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  1. Agree with that and also think Davies needs to be in an attacking role for Canada. Bayern is light years ahead of Concacaf competition and Davies would be wasted in a LB role for Canada given how we play and the level of other players on Canadian roster (i.e. way lower than Bayern level).
  2. Have to agree Delgado brings much more. Chapman has all kinds of talent, but very modest tactical wherewithal. Simply doesn't read the game well.
  3. How can we be so dumb as to not plan for contingencies? Honestly, we've been out-witted by the rest of the confederation. Canada has only Canada to blame and that we can't outrank countries with a fraction of our GDP per capita and population is utterly embarrassing. Sure, the CONCACAF qualification format is a joke, but what is the bigger joke...the format or our very long standing inability to field better teams in, at a minimum, the top six teams in our confederation? If we suffer from this format, we only suffer from our own ineptitude. To blame anyone or anything else would only perpetuate the approach and mentality we've consistently adopted and demonstrated over many decades.
  4. Hard to argue with you about Mathaus. His post playing career has been pure unintentional comedy.
  5. The CSA has taken to posting these documents on its website (there was a time when they were very loathe to do so) and I think they should be commended for this kind of transparency. As far as how to read the financials, I think the story is quite telling around both the CSA and soccer in general in our country. The statement that this is a small organization is spot on - very bare bones and limited in what it can achieve. In effect, this is a body that runs national team programs (and they are clearly not expansive programs) and sets standards (though they lack both the means to ensure execution). Further, the revenue base is largely dependent on grass roots fees (approx 40% after you adjust for the revenue items detailed in note 7). This financial model will never allow to the CSA to properly execute a long term national vision/strategy. The financial architecture of the system simply won't allow for top down leadership, which in most successful countries is what you will encounter. So, how do you fix this? That's the million dollar question and likely rests on (a) the sustained success of the mens program and (b) the ability to monetize any success.
  6. Serious question for anyone who might know...how/why did TFC Academy release this kid? Seems to have developed into a very strong pro.
  7. With due respect, I would argue that inviting a tournament who's organizers have asked to receive a tax exemption, circumvent our labour laws and not be subject to standard foreign exchange rules does present a downside. A large one in my opinion.
  8. I was also in the camp of "don't do it", but for slightly different reasons. My thoughts were around the economic risk to soccer in Canada and the diversion of attention away from player development. I am of the view that Canada is a third world soccer country and that the only way out is to deliberately and slowly build from the ground up. If we spend the next 8 years arranging an event, the attention and money required for proper development will be diverted elsewhere. It's impossible to reasonably imagine otherwise. You might argue that the World Cup could provide a financial windfall that could be used for development, but I am not sure - certainly the stories of the last weeks suggest it would not, but I may be wrong. The new information that has troubled me is that FIFA wants to circumvent local tax and labour laws. This is offensive and should not be tolerated in Canada. The matters of grass on the fields, back up pitches, etc... are quite secondary to all of this.
  9. Makes me ask, as a Ontario/Toronto taxpayer, why my governments are OK with these conditions. Some are fine (pitch quality, advertising control), some are utterly offensive (exemption from tax/labour laws).
  10. Agreed about the corruption angle. FIFA is one of the most crooked organizations in modern times and that it took the US justice system to hold them to account surely does not sit well. The more we learn about the bid process the more I think we should run as far away as possible. Speaking as a taxpayer and law abiding citizen. The soccer fan in me is conflicted, but the overall welfare of society (both fiscal and moral) outweighs my passions as a fan.
  11. Chicago has Soldier Field, which is grass
  12. good article, thanks for sharing. As the article states, this has become true in all youth sports. The sport that figures out a way to address the participation among lower income people, will have a huge advantage in terms of recruiting the best athletes.
  13. This is a good summary. Between the CSA, provinces, districts and clubs, the entire system is an unmitigated clusterf*ck. If Herdman can fix that, then all the power to him. Based on the reactions to his hiring, he's starting in a difficult place. That said, I don't really see this is the job of a NT manager. It's an administrative problem that requires an administrative solution. In fact, I would argue his appointment is a function of the problem, not an attempt to address the problem. We've had a succession of CSA leaders who simply don't seem to want to deal with this for some reason. All that said, if he can achieve something here, then he will have dealt with the single most important issue in Canadian soccer. Unfortunately, I could have made the same observation when Tony Waiters was the MNT coach.
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