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Gloire Amanda


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Press release from Klagenfurt confirms it's a 2-year deal for Gloire - couple quotes include:

 

“We worked hard to bring Gloire Amanda to Waidmannsdorf. He's been very popular with some clubs in Major League Soccer, but he wants to prove himself in Europe. He made that clear in the video calls we had with him. Our fans can look forward to a guy who is cheeky, who knows no fear. He certainly has the potential to help the team and give us a lot of pleasure. "

Gloire Amanda took the plane to Munich in Oregon and was received there by Matthias Imhof. Together we went to Carinthia by car, and he should be on the field as early as Monday at the start of preparations in the sports park. “I am ready to take the next step in my career. The discussions with those responsible at Austria were very trusting, open and honest. I can't wait to get to know everyone and show my skills. "

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23 minutes ago, narduch said:

Until proven otherwise, I think the argument can be made that development wise a young player would be better off heading to Europe and skipping MLS if they can.

Yup Larin should have skipped MLS , even Davies, or all those American players who started in the MLS and then had good careers in Europe, or never mind that , how the hell did Hutchinson become so good without going to Europe at 14 years old ? Or Saltieri both Hutchinson and Saltieri both left can at around 19 or even older I think. I realize Hutchinson and Saltieri did not spend anytime in MLS but to claim that spending a few years in MLS is going to stunt your development somehow is a good one . The bottom line is this if you are talented and have what it takes you will make it if you don’t have what it takes then unfortunately you will not it’s the cruel reality of sports , no matter what route you take . Oh and I really feel for that poor soul Tajon Buchanan for sticking it out in the MLS what was he thinking there is no way this guy has a chance in hell in making a career for himself in Europe.

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Different routes work for different people. David worked out well going to Europe while Davies grew very nicely in Vancouver.

Also look at Dario Zannatta, was desperate to leave Canada for Europe because he felt he could develop better than in Vancouver and now he's living the dream scoring once or twice a season in the Scottish 2nd tier. lol.

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47 minutes ago, narduch said:

Until proven otherwise, I think the argument can be made that development wise a young player would be better off heading to Europe and skipping MLS if they can.

Proof? Plenty of players have succeeded with or without stints in MLS, and plenty have also failed. 

I'm also so sick of this generalization of Europe. It's not one uniform level.

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2 minutes ago, Aird25 said:

Proof? Plenty of players have succeeded with or without stints in MLS, and plenty have also failed. 

I'm also so sick of this generalization of Europe. It's not one uniform level.

When the 3 MLS clubs consistently produce long term professionals I will change my mind on this.

How is TFC's current 'play the young Academy players' mantra going? Its been abandoned.

Everyone else is free to have their own opinion on this matter. But that is mine.

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1 hour ago, narduch said:

Until proven otherwise, I think the argument can be made that development wise a young player would be better off heading to Europe and skipping MLS if they can.

There are exceptions, but its a fair comment. 

MLS teams see Nani and Bradley as investments, meanwhile Okello, Fraser & all, are just rotting away instead of being developed by solid experienced coaches.  Whereas an EU academy/team, would do the opposite and invest/develop the shit out of the young guys.  I'm talking literally force feed skills and knowledge like fois gras.  Generally when a European team invests in an overseas player, they will play him, their primary goal is to develop the players, not just win today.

North America hasn't attained the level of coaching/experience/scouting the EU has.  Due to this the EU is just better at developing players.  They're literally farms for players, they grow them like vegetables to sell later.  I do agree most guys would learn more at that 16-20 range playing in Europe.  There aren't many youngsters here that are groomed from the age of 8 to think, eat and breathe soccer.  It happens in Hockey, but not so much in soccer.  The coaches here at that level just aren't equipped to develop and teach the talent like they are in EU or South America.

That being said, there are several paths to success.  What works for one, won't necessarily work for another.

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2 hours ago, VinceA said:

Damn he really didn't want to be a part of the Vancouver tire fire.

An article from Sandor a couple weeks back said that he would like to go back to Whitecaps but there was no offer at that time.

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1 minute ago, Ivan said:

An article from Sandor a couple weeks back said that he would like to go back to Whitecaps but there was no offer at that time.

But people are quick to jump to conclusions that he didn’t want to go back to the Whitecaps ok.

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1 hour ago, SoccMan said:

Yup Larin should have skipped MLS , even Davies, or all those American players who started in the MLS and then had good careers in Europe, or never mind that , how the hell did Hutchinson become so good without going to Europe at 14 years old ? Or Saltieri both Hutchinson and Saltieri both left can at around 19 or even older I think. I realize Hutchinson and Saltieri did not spend anytime in MLS but to claim that spending a few years in MLS is going to stunt your development somehow is a good one . The bottom line is this if you are talented and have what it takes you will make it if you don’t have what it takes then unfortunately you will not it’s the cruel reality of sports , no matter what route you take . Oh and I really feel for that poor soul Tajon Buchanan for sticking it out in the MLS what was he thinking there is no way this guy has a chance in hell in making a career for himself in Europe.

I believe @narduch mentioned MLS specifically for a reason and that is because MLS does not have a great track record for developing players.  MLS is a win-now league that doesn't necessarily see the value of developing players.  Why invest in a young player when you can just easily bring in some 26 year-old international to fill that hole?  Also, the financial incentive to develop and sell players isn't as great in MLS.  Sure, some have cashed in (VWFC with Davies), but that was a big splash.  If there were a lot more little splashes, it could be very lucrative for the team, but there isn't quite that interest internationally yet.

So, if you are young you need a unique combination of skill and luck to get playing time in MLS.

Larin was lucky to get a shot with the Orlando first team because they got decimated by injuries and he took that shot.  Without those injuries though he could've bounced around the team much like Laryea.  Laryea in fact proves this point: it was just as likely for him to fade out of the sport forever than to succeed as he has.  He was discarded by Orlando and needed a lucky break to make it into the TFC team.  Now he's considered one of the best RBs in the league.  Without that lucky break, he could've been working at a pizzeria with Bryce Alderson.

Same goes for MAK.  Same can be said with Pasher.  To say that all you need is talent to succeed, that is not true.  To succeed in MLS you need talent and luck, almost in equal portions.  Okello oozes talent.  I'll be surprised if he gets 180 minutes the rest of the season (barring a run of catastrophic injuries).

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1 hour ago, narduch said:

When the 3 MLS clubs consistently produce long term professionals I will change my mind on this.

I know what you are trying to say, but there are more than 3 MLS clubs.

 

40 minutes ago, costarg said:

MLS teams see Nani and Bradley as investments, meanwhile Okello, Fraser & all, are just rotting away instead of being developed by solid experienced coaches.

It's rather strange to group Bradley in with Nani in this context, considering Bradley joined TFC at 26.

 

19 minutes ago, El Hombre said:

I believe @narduch mentioned MLS specifically for a reason and that is because MLS does not have a great track record for developing players.  MLS is a win-now league that doesn't necessarily see the value of developing players.

As much as people in here tend to talk of Europe as some sort of monolith, it also happens for MLS.

Like any other league, it has some teams that subscribe to the above philosophy, while others (FC Dallas, NYRB, Philadelphia) are selling young players rather frequently. The league itself has started incentivizing sales of young players, so we should see more in the years to come.

1 hour ago, VinceA said:

Different routes work for different people. David worked out well going to Europe while Davies grew very nicely in Vancouver.

This is it, exactly.

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21 minutes ago, RS said:

Like any other league, it has some teams that subscribe to the above philosophy, while others (FC Dallas, NYRB, Philadelphia) are selling young players rather frequently. The league itself has started incentivizing sales of young players, so we should see more in the years to come.

Oh absolutely.  No argument here.  If you can get involved in one of those organizations, you have a highly likelihood of success as a young player.  I just don't think it is quite trickled down to other clubs just yet.  It is moving that way and is a far cry from when MLS (seemed to) actively block the sales of players ten-ish years ago.

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Personally I would like to see young Canadians move to Europe 9 times out of 10. There's way more teams, way more opportunity, better players, better coaching, higher pressure situations, tougher competition. It's also a challenging and growing experience to move away from home and take on the challenge of surviving in a foreign environment. At the end of the day, Europe is where the best clubs in the world are so it only makes sense that our players should generally all want to reach those heights. If I'm Buchanan for example, I'm wanting to make the move over there asap.

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