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Robert

Would a 4 Nations Tournament fly in Canada?

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Would it be feasible for the CSA to host a 4 Nations Tournament? We share an international border with only one other country, the U.S.A., and if our southern neighbours weren't interested in taking part, then three countries would have to be willing to make quite a commitment to take part. Which countries would be interested in coming to Canada for a 4 Nations Tournament? Canada's climate would also have to be taken into consideration. Is there enough Canadian interest in women's soccer to make a 4 Nations Tournament viable? Especially so, if the U.S.A. fails to take part. 

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Possibly a 4 Nations Tournament featuring teams from the Commonwealth might be the way to go. England (4), Canada (5), Australia (6), New Zealand (19) and Scotland (20) are all going to the 2019 World Cup in France, so why not organize a four matches tournament (2 semi-finals, a final, and a third-place match) over the course of five days in April? The matches could be split between Victoria and Vancouver.

Edited by Robert

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Other Commonwealth countries competing at the 2019 World Cup include:

Nigeria (39)

South Africa (48)

Jamaica (53)

Cameroon (46)

Edited by Robert

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NZ and Cameroon?  And the Dutch to round it out?

I don't think it has much to do with interest. We're not piggybacking on Premier League or Bundesliga revenues, communist government backing or sunshine state tourist funding. For a multitude of reasons the CSA has limited resources and this would require a huge a amount of time and coordination and focus and come with a fair element of risk and little return nationally for it.

Our women's team is first pot in a World Cup draw but our women's domestic game is third world. I'd think investing every spare second, brain cell and dollar there would have enormously more results.

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6 hours ago, Vic said:

NZ and Cameroon?  And the Dutch to round it out?

I don't think it has much to do with interest. We're not piggybacking on Premier League or Bundesliga revenues, communist government backing or sunshine state tourist funding. For a multitude of reasons the CSA has limited resources and this would require a huge a amount of time and coordination and focus and come with a fair element of risk and little return nationally for it.

Our women's team is first pot in a World Cup draw but our women's domestic game is third world. I'd think investing every spare second, brain cell and dollar there would have enormously more results.

Is the glass half full, or half empty?

Whatever money the CSA has generated, it is undisputed fact the majority of it has come by virtue of the women's game. Therefore, why not reinvest some of those resources back into what earned the cash in the first place? With the enormous struggles that have been encountered in trying to launch a professional domestic league for men in this country, it would seem to be an unimaginable impossibility to try and establish a similar structure for Canadian women in our lifetime.

By stating that "We're not piggybacking on Premier League or Bundesliga revenues, communist government backing or sunshine state tourist funding," are you implying we live in a third-world country when it comes to soccer? You have a valid point that somebody would have to pay for a 4 Nations Tournament in Canada. Why not piggyback on 3 MLS teams? Why not get some Federal, Provincial and Civic government backing? And the very pleasant climate that Vancouverites and Victorians are privileged to enjoy in the spring does attract a lot of tourists from other parts of Canada and abroad.

Given these conditions, could the CSA not exhaust its brain cells a little and figure out a way to make a modest annual women's tournament work in Canada?

 

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13 hours ago, Robert said:

Possibly a 4 Nations Tournament featuring teams from the Commonwealth might be the way to go. England (4), Canada (5), Australia (6), New Zealand (19) and Scotland (20) are all going to the 2019 World Cup in France, so why not organize a four matches tournament (2 semi-finals, a final, and a third-place match) over the course of five days in April? The matches could be split between Victoria and Vancouver.

Like the 4 nation idea but not your teams. 

We need to play against a variety of team styles that ideally are close to our group opponents. Plus, it is a no no to play against a group opponent before the World Cup (i.e. NZ).

 

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5 minutes ago, red card said:

Like the 4 nation idea but not your teams. 

We need to play against a variety of team styles that ideally are close to our group opponents. Plus, it is a no no to play against a group opponent before the World Cup (i.e. NZ).

 

Good points. New Zealand is out. As to a variety of styles, how about inviting one European country, England or Scotland, one from CONCACAF, Jamaica, and possibly Australia, or one of the African countries, Cameroon, Nigeria or South Africa? 

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4 hours ago, Robert said:

Is the glass half full, or half empty?

....it would seem to be an unimaginable impossibility to try and establish a similar structure for Canadian women in our lifetime.

Odd combination. Of course it isn't the same structure, nowhere in the world is it. But to create something, anything - there are only 25,000 ringette players in Canada and they have done it. That is 1 in every 1400 Canadians.

"Why not reinvest some of those resources back into what earned the cash in the first place?"

Definitely. But creating something to give women opportunities to stay in the game outside the national team past 18 at an elite level and to develop a pool of players is 100 times more valuable than hosting games in a city.

"Are you implying we live in a third-world country when it comes to soccer?"

On the women's club side yes we are.

"You have a valid point that somebody would have to pay for a 4 Nations Tournament in Canada. Why not piggyback on 3 MLS teams? Why not get some Federal, Provincial and Civic government backing?"

Not sure where you live but in terms of governments ability to act swiftly I think it may be a different one than the one I have. And considering our 3 MLS teams have little to no exposure on the women's side I think the process and outcome you are describing (which is not modest and is an enormous amount of work and resources) is not one that can be done in the FIFA window before May.

 

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53 minutes ago, Vic said:

Odd combination. Of course it isn't the same structure, nowhere in the world is it. But to create something, anything - there are only 25,000 ringette players in Canada and they have done it. That is 1 in every 1400 Canadians.

"Why not reinvest some of those resources back into what earned the cash in the first place?"

Definitely. But creating something to give women opportunities to stay in the game outside the national team past 18 at an elite level and to develop a pool of players is 100 times more valuable than hosting games in a city.

"Are you implying we live in a third-world country when it comes to soccer?"

On the women's club side yes we are.

"You have a valid point that somebody would have to pay for a 4 Nations Tournament in Canada. Why not piggyback on 3 MLS teams? Why not get some Federal, Provincial and Civic government backing?"

Not sure where you live but in terms of governments ability to act swiftly I think it may be a different one than the one I have. And considering our 3 MLS teams have little to no exposure on the women's side I think the process and outcome you are describing (which is not modest and is an enormous amount of work and resources) is not one that can be done in the FIFA window before May.

 

I have compared every argument you made above with the Australian 4 Nations Tournament format that The Ref posted above. Now what does the Football Federation Australia have that the Canadian Soccer Association doesn't? To me it looks like the Aussies aren't afraid to roll up their sleeves and do the work necessary to make it happen, while on the other hand the CSA just continues to look for reasons not to do anything. One needs to go no further than to compare the two respective websites. Whereas the Down Under site has an exciting, promising and interesting feel to it, the CSA's site appears dull and boring.

https://www.ffa.com.au/

https://www.canadasoccer.com/?gclid=CjwKCAiAmO3gBRBBEiwA8d0Q4gCdK1YigngDDTsyW4BmR4J2PjF00voOGCtWwNHxmnq1TN475uJNORoCFQEQAvD_BwE

Australian football fans will have a great opportunity to witness the Westfield Matildas in action ahead of next year’s FIFA Women’s World Cup™ in France when the team features in the inaugural ‘Cup of Nations’ on home soil in late February and early March 2019.

Football Federation Australia (FFA), with the support of the New South Wales Government, Brisbane City Council, and the Victorian Government, will host the four-nation tournament which will comprise of three double-header matchdays across three states, cities, and stadia, over seven days.

The Cup of Nations will see the Westfield Matildas joined by fellow FIFA Women’s World Cup France 2019™ contestants Argentina, Korea Republic and New Zealand.

The six-match tournament will kick-off at Jubilee Stadium in Kogarah on Thursday, 28 February with Argentina playing Korea Republic followed by the Westfield Matildas against New Zealand. The New Zealand match will take on extra significance as 2019 marks 40 years since the Westfield Matildas played their first ‘A’ international, which was against the Football Ferns, at Sutherland in 1979. The fixture will enable FFA to honour and celebrate the anniversary of the match at a venue close to where the historic fixture was held.


Three days later, the Cup of Nations will shift to Brisbane as Argentina and New Zealand go head to head at Suncorp Stadium, before the Westfield Matildas take on Korea Republic in their second match of the tournament. This will mark the first fixture played by the Westfield Matildas in Brisbane since 2014.

Melbourne’s AAMI Park will play host to the third and final match day of the Cup of Nations on Wednesday, 6 March where Korea Republic will take on New Zealand, and Australia will meet Argentina in the last game of the competition.

Tickets for all matches will go on sale to Australia’s Football Family at 12pm (AEDT) today, and to the General Public from 12pm (AEDT) on Thursday, 20 December 2018. 

For more details on tickets, click here. 

FFA Chief Executive Officer David Gallop AM said he is delighted that there will be three opportunities for the Australian public to bid farewell to their football heroes ahead of the commencement of their FIFA Women’s World Cup™ campaign.

“We’ve been working towards hosting a four-nation tournament in Australia for some time and it’s great to finally unveil what we plan on becoming a regular feature of the Australian sporting calendar,” Gallop said.

“We’ve seen the success of other competitions such as the Tournament of Nations in the USA and they’ve helped inspire and inform the creation of the Cup of Nations.

“The 2019 Cup of Nations will present football fans in Australia’s three biggest cities with the opportunity to farewell the Westfield Matildas ahead of the FIFA Women’s World Cup™, as well as get a taste of the international football festival that awaits in France.

“All four sides will be aiming for success at the World Cup, and we expect the quality of the six matches to be world-class. 

“The opportunity to honour the 40th anniversary of the Matildas’ first ‘A’ international fixture will make the New Zealand match in Sydney a special occasion for the first generation of Matildas who made the sacrifices and laid the foundations for success the team enjoys today,” he said.

Westfield Matildas Head Coach Alen Stajcic, who recently returned from the FIFA Women’s World Cup France 2019™ Final Draw in Paris, said playing three matches against high quality international opponents ahead of the World Cup would be great for his team.

“Korea Republic, Argentina, and New Zealand will each offer different challenges for our side which will be fantastic preparation for our group leading up to the tests that await in France,” Stajcic said.

“With a match against the United States also set down for April, we are starting to build out a strong schedule for the Westfield Matildas in the lead up to the FIFA Women’s World Cup.

“I’m pleased that, with the assistance of our match partners, we have been able to lock in more games on home soil which will only continue to grow the passion that exists for the Matildas,” he said.

Australia will compete in Group C at the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup™ alongside Italy, Brazil and Jamaica, while New Zealand will contest Group E alongside Canada, Cameroon, and Netherlands. Meanwhile, Korea Republic will play in Group A alongside France, Norway, and Nigeria, while Argentina will face England, Scotland, and Japan in Group D.

Quotes Attributable to ‘Cup of Nations’ Partner Representatives

New South Wales Minister for Tourism and Events, Adam Marshall, said:

“The Cup of Nations is part of the NSW Government’s five-year partnership with Football Federation Australia that is expected to inject more than $20 million into the State’s visitor economy. 
“We’re proud to host the first of the matches on New South Wales soil and encourage people from far and wide to make the trip to Kogarah to cheer on our Matildas in what will be an action-packed showcase of women’s football right here in Sydney.

Brisbane Lord Mayor Graham Quirk said:

“The Cup of Nations would be a spectacular addition to Brisbane’s 2019 calendar of sport.

“I look forward to welcoming the Westfield Matildas and teams from New Zealand, Argentina and Korea Republic to Brisbane in March 2019 for what will be a thrilling double header at Suncorp Stadium.

“Major and significant events are worth more than $150 million annually to Brisbane and support our hotels, restaurants, cafes and service providers.

Victorian Minister for Sport, Tourism and Major Events Martin Pakula said:

“There was no better place than Australia’s sports capital to host home grown legends like Sam Kerr and her teammates as they warm up against some of the world’s best.

“From the local under 12s to the W-League, women’s football is booming throughout Victoria thanks largely to the feats of the Matildas.

“I encourage all Victorians to come along to AAMI Park to send off our champions in the best possible way before they head off to do us proud in the World Cup.

2019 Cup of Nations – Match Schedule

Matchday One
Date: Thursday, 28 February 2019
Venue: Jubilee Stadium, Kogarah (Sydney), New South Wales
Match One: Argentina v Korea Republic – 4.35pm kick-off (AEDT)
Match Two: Westfield Matildas v New Zealand – 7.30pm kick-off (AEDT)
Tickets: https://matildas.footballaustralia.com.au/tickets


Matchday Two
Date: Sunday, 3 March 2019
Venue: Suncorp Stadium, Brisbane, Queensland
Match One: Argentina v New Zealand – 3.05pm kick-off (AEST); 4.05pm (AEDT)
Match Two: Westfield Matildas v Korea Republic – 6.00pm kick-off (AEST); 7.00pm (AEDT)
Tickets: https://matildas.footballaustralia.com.au/tickets


Matchday Three
Date: Wednesday, 6 March 2019
Venue: AAMI Park, Melbourne, Victoria
Match One: Korea Republic v New Zealand – 3.05pm kick-off (AEDT)
Match Two: Westfield Matildas v Argentina – 6.00pm kick-off (AEDT)
Tickets: https://matildas.footballaustralia.com.au/tickets

Edited by Robert

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What does the FFA have that the CSA doesn't?  They've had a well known women's pro league for over a decade. One step at a time.

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6 hours ago, Vic said:

What does the FFA have that the CSA doesn't?  They've had a well known women's pro league for over a decade. One step at a time.

So if somebody in Canada were to start up a women's pro league tomorrow, then the CSA is going to sit around and wait another 10 years before it takes that first step? After having been in existence since 1912, does the CSA have a plan for the future? I for one would like to know what the CSA's first step looks like. Again using the FFA's home page as an example, the following is something I wouldn't mind seeing on the CSA's homepage:

FFA Chairman Chris NikouDec 18, 2018

Dear Football Family,

An open letter to the Australian Football Community 
 
Last week, the new Board of Football Federation Australia met for the first time. 
 
The meeting was an important one on many levels. 
 
Whilst expansion of the Hyundai A-League was a key outcome of the meeting which has rightly excited football fans, this was just one part of a longer conversation which we’d like to provide you more insight on.  
 
It was a productive discussion which benefitted from the continuing knowledge of previous directors Crispin Murray and Kelly Bayer-Rosmarin, along with the fresh perspective of newly elected directors Heather Reid AM, Joseph Carrozzi and Remo Nogarotto. 
 
The Board of Directors was briefed by Senior Management on the broader strategy for the organisation, a strategy which is coming to its end in 2019.  
 
We will now commence work to build towards the next four-year plan for our game. 
 
The first step in that process is to set out an ambitious 100-day plan which seeks to define a true unity of purpose across the football family. 
 
The 100-Day Plan comprises the following key, but not exhaustive, elements: 
 
• Increased and improved communication with the football family, including through Community Football Summits and a Fans Forum  
• Establishment of and advancement of work undertaken by the New Leagues Working Group • Establishment of the National Second Division Working Group
• Appointment of a new National Technical Director
• Finalisation of the review of the National Club Identity Policy
• Formal commencement of the bid for the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup  
• Enhancing our relationships across the Asian Football Confederation and beyond • Hosting of the inaugural Women’s Cup of Nations across Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne
• Commencement of a review into the National Premier Leagues encompassing licensing criteria, youth development, training compensation and the cost of playing  
• Nationally co-ordinated government relations activity throughout 2019 
 
All this consultation and research will inform the development of a new four-year strategy for FFA and a more defined roadmap for finalisation of this plan will be provided by the end of March 2019. 
 
The football family covers a broad section of the community, each with different priorities and interests. It is the job of the FFA Board to unite our football community, move beyond recent challenges and start to work, collectively, with a single purpose to advance the interests of the whole of our game.  
 
On this journey, we will not travel alone.  In our first 100 days, we will embark on an extensive consultation process across the country. As a first step, a series of forums, attended by Directors, will be held in the New Year. These forums will provide the opportunity to explore future plans but more importantly listen to the feedback of the football community and begin to harness its power.  
 
The forums will include a series of Community Football Summits involving Member Federations, Zones and District Associations, grassroots clubs, NPL clubs, coaches, referees, fans, Women’s Council members and other stakeholder groups across each capital city.  
 
Separately, in conjunction with clubs, a Fans Forum will be held to hear from those who make our game so special, those that create the atmosphere many other sports could only dream of. We need to hear from the fans of our great game. We are fully aware of the work undertaken in the off-season by the management team to improve the fan experience, but we also acknowledge that we need to grow attendances in our league competitions. For those that can’t attend these forums, we will make sure you can have your say by providing a live stream of these important events. 
 
Further details on dates and venues, which will also be open to media, will be provided early in the New Year. We look forward to seeing you and hearing your views on our game.  
 
Our engagement with our football family will not be limited to these forums. We recognise that the way we all communicate is changing, so we will be sure to talk and listen through regular dialogue in the media, on social media platforms and we want to make sure you are part of our journey along the way. 
 
As I mentioned last week, our work on expansion doesn’t end with the announcement of Western Melbourne Group and Macarthur South West United as the 11th and 12th teams in the Hyundai A-League. We need to ensure both these teams are ready to excel in their first season, with the support of FFA. In considering the preferred bids, one of the key factors in our decision was the long-term growth opportunity for each club and their ability to be a driving force in growing the league. Further expansion beyond 12 teams requires careful planning and deep consultation with existing A-League Clubs and the wider football community.  
 
An important first step in the next stage of expansion is to evolve the structure for the league in the future. The FFA management team has already undertaken a significant amount of work in this regard. FFA will be represented on the New Leagues Working Group (NLWG) by Directors Crispin Murray and Joseph Carrozzi. The NLWG will review the current model for the Hyundai A-League and identify options to establish a new operating model which gives owners, clubs, players, officials, sponsors and fans a sustainable, long-term commercially attractive proposition that will deliver continued growth for the game as a whole. 
 
Another vital area where prompt attention is required is to build out the pathway to our professional competitions for other clubs that may aspire to be a part of them. To this end, a separate working group, to be led by Director Remo Nogarotto, will explore the establishment of a national second division. The working group will ensure that real focus is placed on this opportunity and feed its work into the NLWG whose terms of reference encapsulates all professional club football competitions. The second division working group will also contain representation from the Association of Australian Football Clubs. 
 
These two steams of work on football competition structures will be a major priority in early 2019 and are fundamental to unlocking the future potential of professional club football in Australia. 
 
In a year of particular political significance for Australia, we will increase our engagement across all levels of government to address some of the challenges of our game, including the issue of limited facilities across the country. As the largest community-based sport in the country, football must ensure that it is able to cater for the continued growth in participation demand at the grassroots, as well as provide elite facilities for an expanding player pathway. Much of this increasing demand for facilities is driven by booming female participation. FFA will lead a whole-of-football approach to government in order to pursue partnerships in facility investment and program funding to take into government elections in 2019. 
 
Across all areas of the game that we work in, recognising football’s rich history will be a higher priority for the new Board. This was made evident just yesterday following announcement of the inaugural Women’s Cup of Nations, which will recognise the Matildas’ first ‘A-International’ fixture some 40 years ago against New Zealand and honour this historically significant event during the opening match-day of the tournament.  
 
Increased engagement with Asia is central to both Australian and Asian football reaching their collective full potential. Since the AGM, we have attended FIFA, AFC and AFF events and, in my capacity as Chairman of FFA, I have been nominated to stand for election to the AFC Executive Committee. This is the first time an FFA Chairman has nominated for such a position and is a signal of the heightened importance the new Board places on ensuring the senior leadership of Australian football is deeply engaged in international relations. 
 
As 2018 draws to a close, there is much to look forward to, in what promises to be a particularly eventful 2019.  
 
The year will commence with the Hyundai A-League and Westfield W-League ‘Summer of Heroes’, before attention turns to the UAE for the Caltex Socceroos’ defence of the AFC Asian Cup. We wish Graham Arnold and the team all the very best and know they will do us proud.  
 
For the Westfield Matildas, 2019 provides a real opportunity to challenge for a FIFA Women’s World Cup and we are committed to providing Alen Stajcic and the team with the best possible environment to achieve their potential.  
 
On behalf of the Board of Directors I wish you a safe holiday season and we look forward to an exciting year ahead for football in Australia. 
 
Yours faithfully,

Chris Nikou 
Chairman 

Edited by Robert

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I call out the CSA regularly for their long-term failure in managing and developing the women's domestic game. 

But here's the counterbalance.

What they have done with our women's National team is, given their resources, probably the best in the world.

We have minimal resources. I take issue with how they've been spent over the past decades, but I'd be the first to agree they are scant.

Australian and American societies are good examples of countries which are extremely pro-sport and progressive in their systems and funding models. In Canada we don't hold sport as high on a pedestal and back it up when it comes to funding. We're too politically correct.

That's unfortunately Canadian culture and a framework the CSA has to work in. They aren't rolling in the green and don't have the benefit of inefficiency. Those countries can manage a full slate of activities like:

1. Fostering Elite Women's League/Club program development (non-NSO/PSO)

2. National team performance

3. Full scale comprehensive Marketing and development of the sport (including tournaments)

We have limited resources as a country and can't do all. So we have chosen #2. I slag them for #1. You slag them for #3. Just different views on prioritization.

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6 hours ago, Vic said:

I call out the CSA regularly for their long-term failure in managing and developing the women's domestic game. 

But here's the counterbalance.

What they have done with our women's National team is, given their resources, probably the best in the world.

We have minimal resources. I take issue with how they've been spent over the past decades, but I'd be the first to agree they are scant.

Australian and American societies are good examples of countries which are extremely pro-sport and progressive in their systems and funding models. In Canada we don't hold sport as high on a pedestal and back it up when it comes to funding. We're too politically correct.

That's unfortunately Canadian culture and a framework the CSA has to work in. They aren't rolling in the green and don't have the benefit of inefficiency. Those countries can manage a full slate of activities like:

1. Fostering Elite Women's League/Club program development (non-NSO/PSO)

2. National team performance

3. Full scale comprehensive Marketing and development of the sport (including tournaments)

We have limited resources as a country and can't do all. So we have chosen #2. I slag them for #1. You slag them for #3. Just different views on prioritization.

Nothing personal, but what I find extremely frustrating is that when discussing the CSA, is that you and many who share your point of view always find reasons why other Football Associations are able to accomplish things and provide lots of excuses why the CSA is unable to do the same. If the CSA needs money to do things, like stage a modest 4 Nations tournament, then go out and get the ******* money. Everybody else seems to be able to pay the rent. Why does the CSA always seem to want a free ride. Go to work.

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Ha nothing personal in any way whatsoever, and even if it was I have pretty thick skin when it comes to the topic.

I used to be in that postal code but I've grown more realist over the years. Everybody else on the upper-middle class side pays the rent from the men's game which is a cash cow. Or progressive sport-friendly governments.

Have you ever been to St. Georges Park?  The new DFB HQClairefontaine?... the house at 237 Metcalfe?

There is always room for improvement and victories in financing of the game domestically. More and bigger sponsors, better government relations, etc.  On the women's side I see it as a slow moving target and am more concerned with the split (or lack of a split) and where it gets spent than the actual number.

Who knows though, you could have shaken the trees and loosened some sheckles. Never hurts to think out loud.

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30 minutes ago, Vic said:

Ha nothing personal in any way whatsoever, and even if it was I have pretty thick skin when it comes to the topic.

I used to be in that postal code but I've grown more realist over the years. Everybody else on the upper-middle class side pays the rent from the men's game which is a cash cow. Or progressive sport-friendly governments.

Have you ever been to St. Georges Park?  The new DFB HQClairefontaine?... the house at 237 Metcalfe?

There is always room for improvement and victories in financing of the game domestically. More and bigger sponsors, better government relations, etc.  On the women's side I see it as a slow moving target and am more concerned with the split (or lack of a split) and where it gets spent than the actual number.

Who knows though, you could have shaken the trees and loosened some sheckles. Never hurts to think out loud.

Speaking of postal codes, Mt. Pete should work from home and rent out the former PM's digs at K2P 1R2. The annual rental revenue derived from that should be enough to pay for the Jamaican Women's National Team to come out to Victoria for a 4 Nations tournament. IF he does that, I would be willing to donate the original, recently restored BC Championship trophy that dates back from 1891. There, that's how easy it can be. One opponent and a trophy in a matter of minutes. Just think what could be done if Mt. Pete got off his fat ass and picked up the phone and made a few calls. It's only a modest 4 team women's tournament. If he can't accomplish that, then why is he still drawing a paycheque from the Canadian soccer communities purse? But hey, they're only women, right? And we all know how well the FIGC treat their women.

Edited by Robert

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How is a guy, who can't put on a 4 Nations tournament for women, going to co-host a World Cup Final in 2026? Only in soccer can we go from a money-is-no-object World Cup in Qatar to a pauper co-hosted World Cup in Canada. You'd figure between Mt. Vic & Mt. Pete combined, we'd have enough clout and bargaining power to get the U.S.A. to pay their own way to play in a modest 4 Nation tournament in Victoria and Vancouver. The two Mayors and the BC Premier would be thrilled to get involved in such a project. All Mt. Pete has to do is pick up the phone. Getting a corporate sponsor, which the tournament can be named after, shouldn't be that hard to find to pay the expenses of a fourth team and the rental of two stadiums.

 Now does that involve Mt. Pete investing every spare second, brain cell and dollar?

Edited by Robert

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1 hour ago, Robert said:

Speaking of postal codes, Mt. Pete should work from home and rent out the former PM's digs at K2P 1R2. The annual rental revenue derived from that should be enough to pay for the Jamaican Women's National Team to come out to Victoria for a 4 Nations tournament. IF he does that, I would be willing to donate the original, recently restored BC Championship trophy that dates back from 1891. There, that's how easy it can be. One opponent and a trophy in a matter of minutes. Just think what could be done if Mt. Pete got off his fat ass and picked up the phone and made a few calls. It's only a modest 4 team women's tournament. If he can't accomplish that, then why is he still drawing a paycheque from the Canadian soccer communities purse? But hey, they're only women, right? And we all know how well the FIGC treat their women.

You might want to be carefull, that last sentence reads like a smear towards Italians and Italian Canadians -- a negative insinuation based on race. 

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Are women soccer players viewed equally in Canada?

You tell me. Listen to keynote speaker Chris Rudge's  soliloquy at the 2014 Canada Soccer Hall of Fame banquet. After that you can hear how I responded to Chris' ignorance:

 

 

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By the way, Isabelle Morneau and Geri Donnelly, two Canadian Women’s National Team players, who found success at the highest levels of the game, were being inducted that same evening. Can you imagine how they felt while listening to Chris?

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^No. Your paragraph was about bashing Peter Montopoli . That Peter Montopoli is bad for Canadian women soccer because he is incapable of starting a Four Nations womens Tournament . Then you said  "  But hey, they're only women, right? And we all know how well the FIGC treat their women. "  You use the acronymn FIGC vaguely but then cite examples of all kinds of bad behavior in Italian women soccer.  But that just  makes it worse for you because Montopoli has NO CONNECTION to any of that bad behavior ( he was not a party to it ) The only perceivable connection  here  is his Italianess  --  and that's the smear based on race. 

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6 hours ago, tc-in-bc said:

^No. Your paragraph was about bashing Peter Montopoli . That Peter Montopoli is bad for Canadian women soccer because he is incapable of starting a Four Nations womens Tournament . Then you said  "  But hey, they're only women, right? And we all know how well the FIGC treat their women. "  You use the acronymn FIGC vaguely but then cite examples of all kinds of bad behavior in Italian women soccer.  But that just  makes it worse for you because Montopoli has NO CONNECTION to any of that bad behavior ( he was not a party to it ) The only perceivable connection  here  is his Italianess  --  and that's the smear based on race. 

The FIGC does not represent Italian Canadians. I have provided proof that Canadian women soccer players during the regime of Mt. Vic and Mt. Pete were not treated with the same respect afforded Canadian men soccer players. I would like to see a positive change towards gender equality in this country, especially when it affects a community that I'm close to.

Do you really think that there's any chance the CSA will not organize several international matches in Canada for the Canadian Men's National Team in the months leading up to the 2026 World Cup Final? However, with less than six months to go before the Canadian women play their opening match at the 2019 World Cup in France, there's nothing on the CSA's website announcing any scheduled matches for the women. Just a reminder for everyone: this is the 7th consecutive World Cup Final that the Canadian National Women's Team has qualified for!

So when the CSA released the clip below, I really have to question if Mt. Pete has a Italian-Canadian or Italian "Hey, they're only women" view of women's soccer? The answer will become apparent in less than six months.

SO WHEN IS MT. PETE FINALLY GONNA START TO PRACTICE WHAT HE'S PREACHING IN HIS SLICK LITTLE PROMO AND "JUST DO IT!" OR IS HE JUST ALL TALK AND NO ACTION?

https://www.canadasoccer.com/canada-soccer-ushers-in-new-era-with-nike--p161979

 

 

Edited by Robert

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It's a major amount of work - between the reams of approvals from at least a dozen bodies, insurance, ticketing, security, lawyers, government coordination at three levels, staffing, contingency planning, budgeting, venue coordination, team hosting and coordination, sponsorship, media, etc. You'd be lucky to run a youth tournament four months from now.

And for what benefit? Three games in Vancouver? We've probably played more games there than anywhere else in Canada. All that work for that? If it had to happen, what have we played, one game in Quebec in a decade? Surprised you wouldn't have suggested the April FIFA window there. Weather's fine there then.

We're ranked 6th in the world and it's a Cup year and it's not like we're a bad prom date. We can play as many as we like. With no financial commitment, huge personnel or resource outlay, risk or footing the bill. That's one of the best parts of the ranking and a way to recoup some of the investment in it.

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10 hours ago, Robert said:

The FIGC does not represent Italian Canadians. I have provided proof that Canadian women soccer players during the regime of Mt. Vic and Mt. Pete were not treated with the same respect afforded Canadian men soccer players. I would like to see a positive change towards gender equality in this country, especially when it affects a community that I'm close to.

Do you really think that there's any chance the CSA will not organize several international matches in Canada for the Canadian Men's National Team in the months leading up to the 2026 World Cup Final? However, with less than six months to go before the Canadian women play their opening match at the 2019 World Cup in France, there's nothing on the CSA's website announcing any scheduled matches for the women. Just a reminder for everyone: this is the 7th consecutive World Cup Final that the Canadian National Women's Team has qualified for!

So when the CSA released the clip below, I really have to question if Mt. Pete has a Italian-Canadian or Italian "Hey, they're only women" view of women's soccer? The answer will become apparent in less than six months.

SO WHEN IS MT. PETE FINALLY GONNA START TO PRACTICE WHAT HE'S PREACHING IN HIS SLICK LITTLE PROMO AND "JUST DO IT!" OR IS HE JUST ALL TALK AND NO ACTION?

https://www.canadasoccer.com/canada-soccer-ushers-in-new-era-with-nike--p161979

 

 

 

This would be a great place for a Michael Scott "Just Do It" meme, but the world sucks now. 

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