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Women U17 NTC Invitational

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Is no one alarmed at this result? How far behind have we fallen?

 

The CSA brings in Bev Priestman, ostensibly because no one in Canada could deliver the Women's EXCEL Program in the manner imagined by her mentor, John Herdman, and what exactly are the results? An 8-nil loss to Japan.

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Apparently....

 

In Focus: Beverly Priestman, Director of CSA Women’s Excel Program (U14/U17) Beverly Priestman

bev_int_quote_EN.jpg

Wherever she’s gone, success has followed.

Everton FC knew she was a winner, hiring her even before she finished university. A year later Beverly Priestman joined England’s Football Association. Soon after, her ability caught the attention of New Zealand Football, where in 2011, after five years and a series of promotions, she became the head of football development at 25 years-of-age.

In 2013, Priestman, in search of a new challenge, decided to join Canada Soccer as the Director of the Women’s Excel Program (U-14/U-17). And, once again, results have followed.

 

So if I follow the time line.... she has never really coached day to day in a competitive league... she has been working in development.

 

So 25 in 2011 add on three years gets her to 28... there are coaches in Canada who have coached women for more years then that with more demonstrated results.

 

Ottawa Fury former women's coach for one is probably a better fit, but then he does not have an accent from over home.. it never changes.

 

sigh...

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I suspect it's more about preparing the players for inclusion in the senior side rather than just winning in their age group.  For many of the players, that may be a temporary step back in terms of productivity.

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1.  The Japanese are U17 World Cup champions, giving up one goal in six games and scoring 23.

2.  Our U17 team get together at most a couple weeks a year.  Japan being a small island would train together year round.

3.  Who won the 2008 and 2010 U17 World Cups?  Both Koreas.  I doubt 2% of the people involved in women's soccer could name those.

4.  If you look at our U17 teams from those two tournaments, conversion to senior is about 10%.  If we come in last and make that 20% our youth program is extremely successful.

 

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^^ Your reasons for Japan success are missing an important fact.  That is the standard required for playing in Japan leagues is far, far, far greater than our best players here can mustard.  This fact is from a reliable source.  This means that while we do not elevate our own standards we will not be more competitive.  I would not therefore say that our youth program is extremely successful.

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The L League was formed over 25 years ago.  A talented 14-16 year old in Japan like Mana Iwabuchi lived at home and was in a professional club training environment (with senior internationals and foreigners) and together with the national team throughout the year.

 

A talented 14-16 year-old in Canada is in a generally weak amateur youth club team, an age-specific provincial program, and together with the national team a couple weeks a year.

 

These are apples and oranges, and until there's a national network of elite women's programs this isn't going to change.  It will be a long time before we can reproduce this.

 

An interesting observation is the #1 ranked Germans have arguably the best professional women's league in the world and their preferred methodology for talented girls is to play with boys (and not women).  That we can reproduce.

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I watched some of the Canadian games in the CONCACAF U15 tournament last summer.  Although we won the tournament with the strongest team there, it was touch and go in a few of the games because the players were made to practise playing in a certain way that they still weren't comfortable with.  Just letting them run rampant and use their skill would probably have resulted in bigger victories, but they were made to stick to the system.  In a post-game interview, Priestman mentioned that the training in the system and style of play was the important part, not the winning.  They are probably still learning in this tournament, and I'm fine with that.  At least they're putting some thought into how best to build a senior team given our situation (huge country, small population, miniscule fan base for women's games,...)

Edited by rkomar

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I don't remember her giving that secret out.  However, I'm sure it was to get them used to the system used by the senior team, whatever that is.  I recall the U15 players trying to play the ball up the field with short passes, and trying to keep possession.  I'm sure hoofing it up to the forwards would have resulted in more goals against the CONCACAF teams that were at the tournament.  The team that they played in the finals got there that way, having an outstanding athlete as their striker.

 

P.S.  Their final two games are still up for streaming at concacaf.com in the videos section.  That outstanding athlete was Mondresi of Haiti.  I watched the final interview with Priestman, and I'm no longer sure that it was her that talked about the goals of the Canadian team.  It may have been Kristina Kiss, who was there to mentor players, and was doing some guest commentating on the side.

Edited by rkomar

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I thought our girls played better than the U.S. in the first half, they were faster, eager and moved the ball well, but in the second half the roles got reversed and the U.S. dominated having several scoring chances only to be saved by our GK who was superb.

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No CSA coverage, the USA recap:

 

U-17 WNT Defeats Canada 2-0 at U-17 Women's NTC Invitational
Feb 13, 2015 
 
Second Win in as Many Games Sets Up De Facto Championship Match against Japan on Feb. 15 at 4 p.m. PT on ussoccer.com
 
CARSON, California (Feb. 13, 2015) – The U.S. Under-17 Women’s National Team got late scores from Emina Ekic and Ashley Sanchez to defeat Canada 2-0 and earn its second win in as many games at the 2015 U-17 Women’s NTC Invitational. Japan defeated Mexico 2-0 in the earlier match.
 
As the USA and Japan have both won their first two matches, the tournament finale between the two teams on Sunday, Feb. 15, at 4 p.m. PT, will be for the championship. Japan owns a superior goal differential (plus-10), and needs just a tie to take the tournament title while the U.S. (plus-4 goal differential) needs a victory. Canada meets Mexico at 1 p.m. PT on Feb. 15 for third place. All the matches are being played on the Glen “Mooch” Myernick Field at U.S. Soccer’s National Training Center and can be watched live on ussoccer.com.
 
Canada kept the USA off the board until the 79th minute when Kiara Pickett picked up her third assist of the tournament. Pickett played a hard pass on the ground into the penalty area to Ekic who collected, beat a defender inside the goal box and then finished smartly to give the USA the 1-0 lead. It was Ekic’s first international goal.
 
Sanchez, who scored a hat trick against Mexico last Friday, added a stoppage-time score to clinch the victory. The goal in the first minute of second-half stoppage time came off an assist from Frankie Tagliaferri, who also set up Sanchez’s third goal against Mexico. Sanchez beat two players on the dribble before finishing into the upper right corner. It was her 10th international goal at the U-17 level. Brooke Bollinger picked up the shutout in goal for the USA, going the full 90 minutes.
 
At this tournament last year, the USA defeated Japan 2-1 to take the tournament title. Japan then went on to win the 2014 FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup.
 
This group of players, born in 1999 and 2000, are working to qualify for the 2016 FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup. The age cutoff for that tournament is players born on or after Jan. 1, 1999.
 
-U.S. U-17 Women’s National Team Match Report-
 
Match: U.S. U-17 Women’s National Team vs. Canada U-17 Women’s National Team
Date: Feb. 13, 2015
Competition: 2015 U-17 Women’s NTC Invitational
Venue: Glenn “Mooch” Myernick Field; U.S. Soccer’s NTC, Carson, California
 
Scoring Summary: 1 2 F
USA                          0 2 2
CAN                         0 0 0
 
USA – Emina Ekic (Kiara Pickett)                       79th minute
USA – Ashley Sanchez (Frankie Tagliaferri)       90+1
 
Lineups:
USA: 22-Brooke Bollinger; 2-Joanna Harber (23-Sydney Zandi, 84), 13-Karina Rodriguez, 3-Sierra Enge, 9-Kiara Pickett, 19-Taryn Torres (8-Brianna Pinto, 84), 5-Jaelin Howell, 14-Alexa Spaanstra, 15-Ashley Sanchez, 17-Jordan Taylor (21-Emina Ekic, 46), 4-Rachel Jones (18-Frankie Tagliaferri, 59)
Subs not used: 1-Hillary Beall, 7-Karlie Paschall, 1 0-Taryn Ries, 11-Isabel Rodriguez, 16-Sophia Smith, 20-Olivia Jo Wade
CAN: 1-Lysianne Proulx; 3-Julia Grosso , 6-Kennedy Faulknor, 5-Samantha Chang, 2-Emma Regan, 11-Camila Gomez,8-Sarah Stratigakis (14-Nahida Baalbaki, 38),15-Caitlin Shaw (4-Fallon Rodrigues, 66), 17-Shana Flynn (16-Vital Kats, 81), 9-Jordyn Huitema (12-Lauren Raimondo, 60),10-Anyssa Ibrahim
Subs not used:7-Maya Jones, 13-Kavina Gane, 18-Marissa Zucchetto, 19-Teni Akindoju, 20-Kayla Mostowich
 
Stats Summary: USA / CAN
Shots: 17 / 5
Shots on Goal: 12 / 2
Saves: 2 / 9
Corner Kicks: 8 / 2
Fouls: 4 / 5
Offside: 1 / 1
 
Misconduct Summary:
CAN – Fallon Rodrigues (caution) 81st minute
 
Officials:
Referee: Yoshimi Yamashita (JPN)
Assistant Referee 1: Amanda Ross (USA)
Assistant Referee 2: Michelle Provan (USA)
Fourth Official: Danielle Chesky (USA)

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Thanks for the link to the Canada/USA game.  From memory, the Canadian team looks the same as the one that won the CONCACAF U-15 tournament last August.  If they were up against the other countries' U-17 teams, then it's no wonder they were a little outclassed; they were probably a year or two younger than their competition.  If so, I'm not so worried about the results.

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