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CSA votes for governance reform (albeit for 2015)


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C'mon, people! The CSA voted for governance reform today (although it won't be fully implemented until 2015). This is Canada's version of the Crawford Report being implemented in Australia. Are you all too polite to start this thread?

Sweeping governance reform passes at Canadian Soccer special meeting

Historic day for soccer in Canada

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CSA board is like the Mubarak regime - just can't leave NOW. They still want 2 more times to get their snouts in the trough: WC 2014 and possibly Women's 2015. And worst case scenario is that they'll screwing it up for another 4-5 years and have another 4-5 years to think of some fantastic plan to maintain some vestiges of the old system beyond 2015.

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I think a lot of people are still worried that they will **** it all up before 2015 and we will be back to status quo.

I think that's a 100% legit concern. There's no comprehensible reason why this has to take so long.

Time to step aside already. Natives are getting restless.

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C'mon, people! The CSA voted for governance reform today (although it won't be fully implemented until 2015). This is Canada's version of the Crawford Report being implemented in Australia. Are you all too polite to start this thread?

Perhaps the delay is the reason why reactions are still cold towards this apparent monumental event. I think most of us share legit concerns on what will happen until 2015 - and lack of patience as to why things cannot change in the immediate. I for one, am unsure how to react. I am both happy and disappointed...

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The delay sucks yes, but the influence of sitting provincial board directors is still being reduced in the interim to 3 spots.

There are definitely Provincial Presidents who would be able to do an effective job as the three, if the right ones are chosen. As long as none of them are current Quebec or Nova Scotia Presidents or present Alberta reps or from the Executive, in particular Maestracci, Montagliani, Reed or Traficante. That leaves quite a few to choose from.

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CSA board is like the Mubarak regime - just can't leave NOW. They still want 2 more times to get their snouts in the trough: WC 2014 and possibly Women's 2015. And worst case scenario is that they'll screwing it up for another 4-5 years and have another 4-5 years to think of some fantastic plan to maintain some vestiges of the old system beyond 2015.

This is my main concern. Yes I followed the twitter and found it funny when someone was told to stop and said NO. Good for you!

So what can the current losers in the executive do with this stay of execution? Can they foul things up and keep their position and perks? As far as I'm concerned the only CSA people who should get an all expenses paid vacation to Brazil in 2014 are Kara Lang and Jason de Vos. True red Canadian soccer reps!

Oh how different it would have been had the legally and democratically elected president of the ASA (Mr Billings) been voting for Alberta instead of Mario's chosen flunky! By allowing their executive losers to suspend Billings we have to live with a 4 year delay. That sucks. Better late than never but it was always more important to send the CSA executive losers to Brazil in 2014 than a team to compete.

In the end Quebec came around as I thought they would and I'm glad to see it. Focus on your province and developing players for the Impact and above and you'll do great.

In the end they all knew that by the end of April there would be a president from the ASA in favor of reform so they got a delay and will milk the system for their own benefit for another few years. Better late than never but we could have had it now. Why the turn around of votes when a 3 year extension turns into a 4 year one? Oh yea the 3 year extension would leave them out of the WC 2014 gravy train.

I hope Alberta re-elects Mr Billings as president and tells the CSA accept our legally elected rep or lose one million dollars a year. Time to force the issue.

Not the "giant leap for Canadian soccer" I was hoping for but it is a step in the right direction. Now we just need to keep focused and make sure the job gets finished.

Cheers all.

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As 2015 draws closer, I have no doubt the remaining provincial reps will fight hard for their junkets and perks. But it won't matter: by 2012 the provinces will be marginalized anyway and the professionals on the board could vote them down at their leisure.

I know... well, we've had good cause to be cynical for years and years. But this might actually have been a substantial moment in the history of Canadian soccer.

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As 2015 draws closer, I have no doubt the remaining provincial reps will fight hard for their junkets and perks. But it won't matter: by 2012 the provinces will be marginalized anyway and the professionals on the board could vote them down at their leisure.

Not sure why you say this. Following the 2012 AGM there will be a President, Vice-President and six Regional Directors elected by the Provincial/Territorial Associations. Eventually there will be six appointed Directors but they won't be in a position of power and able to outvote the others.

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The work of the CSA Governance Committee needs to be acknowledged as none of this would have happened without the incredible amount of work they put in. Rob Newman and his fellow committee members deserve our heartfelt thanks for their selfless contributions, they really are our governance reform heroes.

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The work of the CSA Governance Committee needs to be acknowledged as none of this would have happened without the incredible amount of work they put in. Rob Newman and his fellow committee members deserve our heartfelt thanks for their selfless contributions, they really are our governance reform heroes.

Hear hear. Thank you all very much. Now lets make sure this doesn't get derailled over the next 4 years ruining all their hard work!

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Not sure why you say this. Following the 2012 AGM there will be a President, Vice-President and six Regional Directors elected by the Provincial/Territorial Associations. Eventually there will be six appointed Directors but they won't be in a position of power and able to outvote the others.

So what is actually changing then? Although getting more qualified people on board looks like a step in the right direction the words "smoke and mirrors" come to mind. Hope I'm wrong on this but I have a sinking feeling that until the provincial associations are cut down to size and lose their overwhelming voting strength at AGMs it is premature for people to be congratulating themselves about sacking the CSA right now.

Maybe I'm missing something but the same set of amateur soccer apparatchiks who have clambered their way up the greasy pole through the first two tiers of soccer associations will still have a major say over who sits on the BoD even after 2015 and the major change at that point is only that people can't be holding an office simultaneously at the provincial and CSA levels. If the six appointed directors want to hang around they won't rock the boat too much so radical change although easier to accomplish after this set of reforms could still be difficult to achieve.

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I think that there is a healthy amount of concern as to whether things will change negatively over the next 4-5 years. On the other hand I would like to learn from those more in the know whether things could potentially change in a positive way over that time. In other words, with what seems to be an upsurge in pro-reform sentiment in places like Alberta is it possible to conceive that the reform timeline could be fast-tracked?

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So what is actually changing then?
Not much it is business as usual in fact in my view the reformed structure is even more disfunctunal then what was before.

Real reform will come when Clubs directly elect the CSA board who cannot be members of any other board, when when the votes are cast according to what your club paid to the CSA in registration fees and % of retained gate receipts for professional clubs in membership.

He who pays the piper must call tune.... so the next step is to press even more strongly for real reform.

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It is the CSA, so I understand some of the cyncism going forward, but If I understand the reports correctly, almost every provincial association voted for immediate change. That gives me hope that cynicism may be misplaced this time.
So if almost every provincial association voted for immediate change why is any change only coming some four years from now... the cynicism is not misplaced the heat has to be kept up in all the provinces ... especially in ones like Nova Scotia and Alberta to ensure new leadership is put in place.
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It is the CSA, so I understand some of the cyncism going forward, but If I understand the reports correctly, almost every provincial association voted for immediate change. That gives me hope that cynicism may be misplaced this time.

As a British prime minister once put it "turkeys don't vote for an early Christmas" so the willingness of these people to vote for reform is one of the key reasons for cynicism, especially when Bill Spiers very much lets the cat out of the bag on how people selected by the provincial associations will still retain majority control on the BoD even after 2015 and hence will be able to determine who gets the appointed positions thus limiting the room for manoeuvre of those 6 people as a concerted voting block.

I can see where Trillium is coming from on the "real reform" bit but the "he who pays the piper must call the tune" thing is a big part of the rationale for a small clique of people from amateur soccer to have control over the national association right now based on their role as a go between in collecting the player registration money from the districts. Ideally the national association should be able to finance itself through sponsorships, broadcast deals and gate receipts generated by the national team and money raised from amateur player registration would stay where it belongs at the grass roots. The voting power ideally should rest primarily with professional clubs and people who have been involved at a professional rather than amateur level should make up a majority of the BoD. When/if there are half a dozen or so clubs combined in MLS and NASL (all going well with the sanctioning of the latter) the numbers will have emerged for that to be more viable as an approach than it is now.

Beyond that at the amateur level the best thing that could happen would be to massively downgrade the role of the provincial associations by having district associations directly affiliated to the national association (a lot of mergers between neighbouring districts would probably be required to make this viable) because that way the people representing amateur clubs at the national level at the AGM would be directly accountable to the clubs and leagues they are representing at the district level AGMs and could be directly mandated to vote certain ways on key issues. A huge part of the problem right now is that the people who wield the power at the provincial association level are two steps away from the people involved at the grassroots in that regard so pretty much have free reign to do whatever they want a lot of the time to push their own self-serving agendas.

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Not much it is business as usual in fact in my view the reformed structure is even more disfunctunal then what was before.

Real reform will come when Clubs directly elect the CSA board who cannot be members of any other board, when when the votes are cast according to what your club paid to the CSA in registration fees and % of retained gate receipts for professional clubs in membership.

He who pays the piper must call tune.... so the next step is to press even more strongly for real reform.

Put extremely succinctly Trillium. Well said.

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