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Vic

2010 CONCACAF U20 Tournament

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Thanks Vic…I appreciate you pointing that one out for me. I just may qualify. I’m of Scottish descent, played the sport at a high level 20 years ago, and definitely have a passion for the game. I don’t have any coaching accreditation of any merit, nor does the advertisement ask for one, but I live close to Vaughan, Ontario. I definitely can spell “education”, I have “organized” a lot of things in my life and by the look of it there is absolutely no need to have any experience in “budgeting”. This is perfect; base on that do you think I have a chance? :o

Soccer9….. I can appreciate your comments however I think “courage” is all about a persons “conviction”. If BR would like to move the game ahead, he simply needs to book himself into a course. :confused:

http://www.tetrabrazil.com/coaches_license/abtf/index_E.html

Guy Bradbury can do something about it by making sure there is budget available each year and that a program for coaching excellence exists. With an expense of approximately $7,000.00 all in for those with qualifications, the OSA could easily be setting standards for their development coaches and establishing guidelines and funding on a programmable basis each year! It is absurd that nothing has been done about this in the past 20 years.

I’m aware of 2 coaches who have just finished this program. They work in the GTA in full time jobs during the day and are involved in Soccer Coaching as a passion. The funding was produced in large part from their savings; an investment to improve themselves as a coach with in their sport. I offer this as an example of integrity and conviction, none of which exists with in BR or Guy Bradbury; actions are the true measurement of a person’s courage. BR just “talks the walk”, nothing more!:rolleyes:

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You never know, and they're obviously pretty serious about it if they keep extending the opening otherwise they would have pulled the trigger long ago.

There was a great Harry Chapin song called "Mr. Tanner." The precis is "The song tells the story of Martin Tanner, a local launderer from Dayton, Ohio who has a gift for singing. His friends try to talk him into becoming a singer because of his beautiful voice, until he finally agrees and uses most of his savings to travel to New York City and sing in a show. He holds a concert only to get panned by critics. He returns home and never sings again, except for only to himself when he sorts through the clothes at night."

One of the key lines is "But music was his life, it was not his livelihood." I'm sure these guy's are great coaches, phenomenal even. But like the song attributes, there is a big difference amateur club coaches taking courses and lifelong professionals.

No one in a Northern climate plays latin football, including the Scots who arguably founded the crazy game.

Edited by Vic
just making sure that wasn't taken the wrong way....

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Harry is a wise old guy….great line. :o

Well I guess environmental factors will win the day in this dialog. Northern climate breeds direct soccer because the players need to run their tales off to keep warm but European and Southern region players need to slow the game down in order to survive the heat. Coaching aside, we just need to have enough patients for global warming to take hold and level the playing field…..

In the words of Phil Woosnam “The rules of soccer are very simple, basically it is this: if it moves, kick it. If it doesn’t move, kick it until it does.” Born December 1932, former Commissioner of the now defunct North American Soccer League.:rolleyes:

The game has evolved!

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It certainly has. Which brings us full circle and closes some things off. No doubt we are working on what Sam mentioned and developing other tricks in the toolbelt so we are not as one-dimensional and are willing to forsake some of our mastery of one tactic for development of others. But as the Ref was saying, these new tactics and skills are probably already being implemented in NTC's and provincial programs, but shouldn't this information be passed down to the clubs where most of the formative development is done?

If it moves, kick it is definitely what I see when I watch the SPL, and I thought you meant the guy with the extra clubs in his bag. But he was Welsh, and how the Hell is a caddy supposed to understand that damn language anyway.

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Canada U20's can't get through concacaf and somehow you need a reason to blame GB and BR. Were they there because last time I checked it was morace behind the bench.

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" posted by inthegame

Canada U20's can't get through concacaf and somehow you need a reason to blame GB and BR. Were they there because last time I checked it was morace behind the bench

Yup; they were their, represented in every Ontario Provincial/NTC player that attended. They certainly share in the blame. If they are not part of the problem, then exactly why are they spending association funds on "player development"? It would be refreshing to see the both of them come forward and speak about their role in this! Perhaps they don't think they have one?

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Sometimes when I'm feeling pessimistic I can't help but thinking, "now we're trying to play the game the same way as everyone else, and everyone else is better at it; that's not going to lead to success, only to more aesthetically pleasing failure."

But then I go watch the Whitecaps U-18 girls (who in the past week knocked off UVic and UBC 5-0 and 4-1), playing with pace, precision, and flair, and I feel a little better. I'm sure there are other teams across the country doing the same. It will take time.

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Sometimes when I'm feeling pessimistic I can't help but thinking, "now we're trying to play the game the same way as everyone else, and everyone else is better at it; that's not going to lead to success, only to more aesthetically pleasing failure."

But then I go watch the Whitecaps U-18 girls (who in the past week knocked off UVic and UBC 5-0 and 4-1), playing with pace, precision, and flair, and I feel a little better. I'm sure there are other teams across the country doing the same. It will take time.

Exactely what our U16 Quebec City team that won the Canadian championship last October was all about. Very nice and effective soccer, no kick and run but ball control, one touch passing, speed, good technical and tactical sense but unfortunately not impressive enough to get the attention of NTC staff.

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Exactely what our U16 Quebec City team that won the Canadian championship last October was all about. Very nice and effective soccer, no kick and run but ball control, one touch passing, speed, good technical and tactical sense but unfortunately not impressive enough to get the attention of NTC staff.

If the NTC staffers have a different standard of what a select players is from what for instance these Quebec girls displayed there is an obvious disconnection there. Now assuming that Carolina Morace is the head honcho for the women program and assuming she likes players with the abilities you described from the Quebec girls in this case, this disconnection or lack of communication of a set standard Morace may have impossed, the problem just get bigger. Would it not be nice if all three national levels, U17, U20 and Adult were all in accord selecting the same type of players? But if we have all age levels going every which way we end with a potpourri of players that take a long time to gel together besides leaving meritorious girls in left field wondering what the hell is anyone looking at.

Maybe Carolina Morace does not have such authority or has not standarized things for national coaches and NTCs. In my view there ought to be some direction and guidelines. Thinking back to the times of Pellerud, at least after a few years it became obvious for everyone what type of player he wanted. His style is no longer that effective and that is why he left and we got Ms. Morace. Maybe I am not as informed as I should be, but right now I am not sure what exactly are Ms. Morace plans for the whole ball of wax. Now if we had a standard set by her and spread around to all clubs in the country through talks, videos, presentations, delegations, etc. we could reasonable start working on an even keel from the very grassroots.

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The phrase I am looking for is "good wine needs no bush:"

"In medieval times, the usual sign for a tavern was to hand an uprooted bush over the door. However, like the inventor of the better mousetrap, the purveyor of first-class wine would not need a bush to attract customers; they would beat a path to his door."

Good players open their own doors. And kudos to the 23 who did. You have my thanks.

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Well said Vic. Any player who sits back and waits to be identified without showing any real initiative doesn't deserve it. Good for those who step up and make the cut.

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That might be fine if you are 16 or 17 years old, but how about the 13 and 14 year old players that are not getting the attention they deserve because of selection bias? When NTC coaches come to town they only look at players who have been "pre-selected" by coaches who (imagine this) select players from their teams to the tryout.

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There are always cads with bias, but they rarely appear on the landscape. It's usually good people who honour the positions. Unless it's an extremely exceptional case like a Kara Lang, NTC coaches don't look at kids until they're 16-17. At 13 it is regional programs and at 14-16 it is provincial programs. Regional programs have open tryouts. Provincial programs all it takes is your club coach recommending you to the regional rep. For all the talk of the biggest and non-"skilled" and politics the game has always been survival of the fittest and the law of the jungle - show up and school players at these and everyone notices - coaches, players, spectators. If you don't then you go back for a year and train harder so the next year you do. At the young ages you are mentioning they are half-year training programs. This is kids soccer. There are a lot of great older teams and great coaches out there for anyone that wants to take pick up the gauntlet.

Edited by Vic
still half-asleep

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14 year olds who inherently have what it takes to eventually make a national team will also have the gumption to do what it takes to be noticed by those who matter at their age group, but for the most part it does take supportive parentsto be sure. That applies right through the teenage years.

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