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SFU NCAA Div II 2011


Regs

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Could be a large development out here on the West Coast.

SFU will be an NCAA Div II school starting in 2011.

Full rides are now available to be awarded to student athletes.

UBC had also applied but withdrew/tabled their application for another year.

While I think it is huge for SFU soccer, the ramifications for the CIS if UBC followed suit shortly after would be enourmous.

In the meantime, I know where I'll be sending my kids :)

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Conceptually it's the equivalent of pulling out a cornerstone building block of the entire Canadian University sport system. And yes it could mean significant change to the Canadian system, but my guess is just a long and painful governance and educational funding fight.

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SFU had long seen itself as an NCAA school and had every intention of moving over when they go the chance. No surprise here as they have little connection to CIS.

UBC won't have it so easy.

As for regs, your kid would still want a D1 school, not D2.

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What kid wouldn't want a D1 school? But I said wher I would be sending them, not what they want :)

Seriously though, I spent a couple of years down south as a student athlete and the education is, well, crap. A Canadian education with American athletic competition is in my view the best scenario.

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SFU has been an NAIA school since day one except for a few sports so very little impact on CIS by moving from NAIA to NCAA II. Different for UBC but then they've delayed their NCAA application. And I agree with Regs over quality of education, unless you are at an Ivy League or equivalent school but even then you have to be careful.

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Vic, SFU has NEVER BEEN a CIS school. Since it was founded in the mid sixties SFU has been a member of the American NAIA. Clearly it has never been an issue when it comes to government funding. So, the only impact on CIS of SFU switching from American NAIA to American NCAA II might be an improved competitive position when recruiting student athletes... some prospects who might otherwise have gone to US schools will consider SFU instead. My youngest son was heavily recruited by US schools but chose to accept what was effectively a full ride scholarship at SFU (soccer) in the late nineties so full ride scholarships at SFU would be nothing new.

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Richard, SFU has been playing in Canada West for 5-6 years now. I think they left a few teams in NAIA but by and large most of their teams were competing in Canda West. I know that the U of Saskatchewan will miss the generally easy points we picked up against them in most sports.

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I know SFU has had a long participation in NAIA, I remember basketball being a big program when I was young and seem to remember football too (read a funny story the other day about a Dutch soccer coach saying odd name for a game you rarely ever use your foot).

Because of their history, SFU's opt to compete in the USA is a minor movement, but anyone else would be much more significant. The CIS has a mandate to protect our sporting infrastructure and I would imagine anyone or anything which threatens that will be frowned upon.

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quote:Originally posted by Vic

We've all known this was coming for quite a while now, and the players at the table. It will be an interesting year.

There are other schools looking .. Carleton for one with its basketball ambitions and the prospect of outside funded football team might make Carleton go NCAA, my wish would be to NCAA div 1 hockey at Carleton, that would generate a lot of interest.

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I may be wrong but one of the main differentiators between NCAA I and NCAA II is the number of NCAA sports the school offers and the degree to which each is funded. So a school may have no choice about which division it can enter if it does not offer sufficient qualifying sports programs. Carleton I expect would not be eligible for Division I and I suspect that's why SFU is going for Div II also. At this point it is quantity not quality.

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Yes Richard, you are correct. One of the main differences between D1 and D2 is the number of sports offer and the degree to which those sports are funded.

D1 schools must offer at least 14 sport teams - at least 7 of which must be female.

D1 school must also fund their programs to at least 70% of the maximum scholarship level.

The NCAA currently has a moratorium on admitting schools to D-1, so SFU, or any other school for that matter, is currently not eligible for D-1 entry.

I would caution people that just because "full ride" scholarships exist, does not mean that they are awarded. As Doyle G has listed there are limits on the number of scholarships that can be offered which differs from sport to sport – and male to female. Many of the sports- soccer being one - are "equivalency sports" where scholarships are divided among the team. Very few athletes receive an actual "full ride".

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quote:Originally posted by D1 parent

Many of the sports- soccer being one - are "equivalency sports" where scholarships are divided among the team. Very few athletes receive an actual "full ride".

Thanks for your informative post and welcome to the board.

I have had many friends who went to the US on scholarships for a variety of sports (the majority for baseball or track & Field).

Of all my friends, only 1 had a year that was fully funded by the school. That's 1 year out of 4 where his expenses were minimal (almost zero but not quite zero). the other 3 years cost him a total of $27,000 US after all scholarship funds were factored in.

The rest of my friends all had to pay handsomely for each and every year that they went to school down south. Some of my friends came home with student debts as high as $40,000 US, despite their scholarships.

Only one of them went on to professional athletic careers (a short one at that, only 3 years of minor league baseball). I sometimes wonder if they would not have been better served by staying home and competing for their university teams here in Canada. I know a couple of people who did choose to stay home but opted to continue their athletic endeavors at the club level because the school programs were insufficient.

For at least half of my friends, I would say that the staying at home option would have saved them at least $10-20K in student debt at minimum, and I have a feeling that most would admit that their educational experience in the US was somewhat lacking (only a couple of my friends ended up going to schools that I would deem "esteemed institutions of higher learning")

So, in short, I'm not really convinced that the US way is the be all and end all for Canadian athletes. I would like to see CIS liberalize scholarship rules a bit to give more incentive to top student athletes to stay home. I would also like to see the schools invest more into their programs to make them more attractive to the better athletes to stay home (if they have the grades). In a sport like Men's Soccer, I think it would be pretty easy to keep most of the top 17-18 year olds at home because full ride scholarship opportunities for male soccer players are very few and very far between. it is a bit of a different story for the ladies though, I will admit.

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^ I agree with you 100%. Another factor to consider is how many of those kids who are celebrated for having been made and accepted an offer from a US university actually graduate from that school with a worthwhile degree, never mind make it later as a professional athlete (a tiny minority at best). In my experience a substantial proportion of them give up and come home early for a variety of reasons then find their US credits are not accepted by Canadian universities or they can't get in to a major Canadian insitution at all because of their grades. As a parent I would be and was, very cautious in evaluating scholarship offers from US schools for my school-leaving youngsters. Even for the so-called 'full ride' there often are substantial hidden costs, monetary and otherwise.

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quote:Originally posted by Vic

Is there a player on the either senior team who has come through the Canadian university system?

it is inevitable that Nana Attakora will be one day part of the MNT and he went to/still goes to York U

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^ Actually, it would not surprise me if there are at least 1 or 2 more young women who are presently involved with CIS Schools that will eventually get a sniff with the WNT

But, until then, I humbly accept defeat at the hands of Loyola

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