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Peschisolido gets Burton Albion job


maxG

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This is great news. Let's hope Paul can start gaining some real experience as a manager and start climbing the ladder.

He might also be able to give some of our young boys looking for clubs a real shot at making a contribution - surely they'll be on his radar.

I just hope he doesn't teach the boys what to do with a corner flag.

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Difficult one given the way they staggered over the finish line to gain promotion from the Conference after Nigel Clough left for Derby and given they will be one of the smallest clubs in League Two next season. I suspect he got the job because most of the usual suspects for these kinds of jobs decided to steer well clear. Oxford United's manager for example preferred to stay in the Conference even after being on record as saying this:- :)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/teams/o/oxford_utd/8020561.stm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/teams/o/oxford_utd/8038384.stm

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I generally roll my eyes when a former player steps into a head coaching position without any real experience to speak of but, like Toronto MB, I'm hopeful that this might result in good things for Canadian players who might get a shot under Paul's stewardship

BBTB, nice find on those articles. I wonder what that manager REALLY thinks about the conference...LOL

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quote:Originally posted by Winnipeg Fury

I still see him clear as day, 16 yrs old with the Toronto Blizzard, ripping through the Winnipeg Fury.

LOL. I remember that day; I also remember screaming to the Fury D

to "cover him!, get him!" as he dashed through the flanks with ease.

As for the quality of "Conference" sides, well someone has to start

somewhere. It's actually a good jump from the Irish League to

League 2, as manager. Much better than as assistant to say, TFC

Reserves or Academy (no disrespect intended).

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quote:Originally posted by VPjr

I generally roll my eyes when a former player steps into a head coaching position without any real experience to speak of but, like Toronto MB, I'm hopeful that this might result in good things for Canadian players who might get a shot under Paul's stewardship

I always wondered about this, for example if a guy from Ghana was named Toronto FC's Manager, It wouldn't surprise me or offend me if he brought in a guy or two from ghana. He'd probably have an inside edge on players from Ghana and as long as you just give a guy or two a chance, no harm done.

But at the same time you see alot of managers seemingly not caring about that? you could say they shouldn't think patriotically for a club but when your dealing with your final roster spots or signing a youth player it probably won't affect your team, and like I said, most people have insidish info on their own country so its probaly more of useful bit of knowledge then a detriment if it's only a couple of people (if they really worked out then maybe 3 or 4 is even fine and considering TFC's roster, a coach could go pretty nuts as long as he just avoided the canadian roster spots and scouted the area, obviously the cheapest area to scout(you could literally blow your budget traveling to one part of the world and still keep great tabs on players internally).

this always bugs me when it's canadians and basketball, how many 2nd round draft picks have the raptors had? how many turned out to be worth jack (pretty much just roko ukic)? when you think about it like that it's kinda ridiculous that they didn't show even the tiny amount of patriotism (what's the worst that could have happened, we'd have had a few Canadians wash out of the raptors just as well as anyone else), even a crumb of patriotism probably would have brought joel anthony here (*cough* undrafted*cough*), and except for Ukic, he is far superior to pretty much every other 2nd round pick we've ever had.

A little bit of patriotism in club sports usually goes a long way, you just gotta make sure you don't go nuts (anthem booing is usually a red flag)

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In case any one is wondering (as I was) if Pesch is the first Canadian to be named Manager at an English club... Canadian born Irishman Jimmy Nichol was the Manager of Millwall 1996-1997. He also managed at Raith Rovers and Dunfermline in Scotland. However, he never played for Canada. So Pesch could very well be the first Canadian International to ever manage professionally in England.

Does anyone know of any others?

Other Canadians that have managed abroad that I know of Frank Yallop (USA) and Colin Miller (Scotland).

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Congrats to Paul,a very good friend of mine.

The other Canadian and this is stretching a little would be Canadian born and Dutch legend Johnny Van't Schip who coached the Dutch team and Ajax alongside Marco Van Basten

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quote:Originally posted by Loud Mouth Soup

Ouch. Pesch on 5Live Football Daily last night:

"Well, I don't really feel Canadian anymore to be honest."

I know it sounded bad, but I'm pretty sure I understand what he meant.

I don't think there's any way you can spin that quote and still not have it sound bad...

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quote:Originally posted by Martyr

In case any one is wondering (as I was) if Pesch is the first Canadian to be named Manager at an English club... Canadian born Irishman Jimmy Nichol was the Manager of Millwall 1996-1997. He also managed at Raith Rovers and Dunfermline in Scotland. However, he never played for Canada. So Pesch could very well be the first Canadian International to ever manage professionally in England.

Does anyone know of any others?

Other Canadians that have managed abroad that I know of Frank Yallop (USA) and Colin Miller (Scotland).

Colin Miller thinks he was the first Canadian coach to get a job in the UK. http://www.victoriahighlandersfc.com/news.php?newsid=68

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Colin Miller can claim to be the first ex-CMNT player maybe but Jimmy Nicholl is definitely a Canadian citizen and was manager of Raith Rovers about a decade before Colin Miller got the Hamilton Accies job. He played for the Blizzard in the NASL so he has had a direct involvement in Canadian soccer despite playing for Northern Ireland. Just left his assistant manager job at Aberdeen so maybe he would be a candidate for the TFC job if things don't work out with Chris Cummins.

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quote:Originally posted by jpg75

I don't think there's any way you can spin that quote and still not have it sound bad...

and yet, why is it that every single person I know who comes from the UK to Canada at a similar age would rather die than admit they were anything other than British at heart...indeed, most of them still say they are British

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Guest Jeffery S.

I do not understand or accept Pesch's comment. He can go screw himself, what a hotshot. The only thing he has done of any significance in his life is pick up a women ten times smarter and probably a good deal more crooked than anything he could have imagined, and play for Canada. The rest is lower division mediocrity.

I have been in Spain for 21 years and I have never said I felt Spanish or Catalan or anything of the like. And I don't believe Pesch feels English or British either, he is just pandering to those who pay him I guess. I have personal friends and cousins in England for that long or longer, from Canada, and they may be assimilated, they may feel very comfortable, they may live the life through their kids, but if you do not have a natural accent and did not grow up in a place saying you have lost your past identity is mostly bullshtting. No one loses their identity like that, it does not happen if you grew up in a place, at least to late teens or early twenties. Pesch has probably been back home more than I over the years too. So I think the comment is pathetic and pretty sad for a guy with a career like his.

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For what it's worth my dad is born abroad and came to Canada when he was in his teen (approx 14-15 yrs old) and if you ask him about his native land he would pretty much tell you something similar to what Pesch said in that interview.

I think it's personnal stuff and it depends on the experiences of each person with the country they left and the country where they are living now.

It's not a very good topic to bring personnal experience as an argument because of that because of the vast difference that can exist between different human being.

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quote:Originally posted by nolando

and yet, why is it that every single person I know who comes from the UK to Canada at a similar age would rather die than admit they were anything other than British at heart...indeed, most of them still say they are British

Exactly the opposite experience. There's always some clown or other but I can honestly say my experience (and I feel like I've been up to my eyeballs in British immigrants at times in my life) has been entirely the opposite. Just being Canadian in their own way and at times maybe trying a bit too hard at it.

I can also say the same thing for almost all the East Indians I know.

In both instances it's always nice to visit family and friends abroad but that's the length of it. Lord knows they wouldn't/couldn't live there anymore.

Pesch has been abroad a loooong time. He's gone over to the English. Natural enough everything considered.

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