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Mo Johnston joins "Extra Time"


Gian-Luca

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Clearly, with JC apparently now more of the "Manager" and not just the coach of TFC, Mo has a lot of time on his hands.

I'll watch. I just hope Lee Godfrey springs for a Scottish to English translation service that can provide subtitles at the bottom of the screen when Mo speaks because Lord knows I can't make heads or tails of half of the stuff he says.

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It wasn't on last week (and won't be on this week). I see they've had Jason de Vos join Lee Godfrey, Paul James and Peter Mallet (Globe & Mail) in their previews of the Euro competition, called 'The Contenders'.

Extra Time comes back next week I take it.

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quote:Originally posted by VPjr

Clearly, with JC apparently now more of the "Manager" and not just the coach of TFC, Mo has a lot of time on his hands.

I'll watch. I just hope Lee Godfrey springs for a Scottish to English translation service that can provide subtitles at the bottom of the screen when Mo speaks because Lord knows I can't make heads or tails of half of the stuff he says.

I actually think Mo discovered long ago he could effectively use his accent as a survival mechanism, a kind of "protective coloration". I'd love to hear some of the interviews he must have given during his days in Kansas City or New York. (wtf did he say . . . ?)

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Mo Johnston doesn't have a particularly strong Scottish accent and regularly uses North American expressions that people would laugh at in Scotland. Given the way he talks a lot more slowly than is normal in Scotland, uses a very limited vocabulary when interviewed, and usually manages to avoid Scottish idiom and dialect I find it hard to believe that people are struggling understanding him. How difficult can it be to pick up stuff like, "Listen, the boys played well but the other team scored more goals than we did, we are going to try harder, it ain't gonna be easy, this is a strong league...."? If he was speaking naturally it would probably be something more along these sort of lines:- :)

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Scottish accents vary quite abit. My Dad was from Glasgow, but after so many years in Canada, the accent disappeared except for when phoning Scotland, or the occassional "aye" and "wee".

Generally speaking, the Glasgow crowd are easy to understand - particularly the educated. It is in the smaller towns and among the non-university-educated where it gets really thick. My cousins live in a small town in Ayrshire just outside Kilmarnock. I can understand them reasonably well because I am used to them, but even fellow Brits have trouble with their Ayrshire accent.

Mo never says anything useful even when asked direct questions, so I don't expect him to volunteer anything that people on the internet forums don't already know. His presence should attract a few more viewers, but it won't be too interesting.

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quote:Originally posted by KAS

Scottish accents vary quite abit. My Dad was from Glasgow, but after so many years in Canada, the accent disappeared except for when phoning Scotland, or the occassional "aye" and "wee".

Generally speaking, the Glasgow crowd are easy to understand - particularly the educated. It is in the smaller towns and among the non-university-educated where it gets really thick. My cousins live in a small town in Ayrshire just outside Kilmarnock. I can understand them reasonably well because I am used to them, but even fellow Brits have trouble with their Ayrshire accent.

Mo never says anything useful even when asked direct questions, so I don't expect him to volunteer anything that people on the internet forums don't already know. His presence should attract a few more viewers, but it won't be too interesting.

So are you saying Mo has a rural accent and is poorly educated ...having been a boy apprentice and not going on for his higher education credits ... ?
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quote:Originally posted by BringBackTheBlizzard

He uses standard English,</u> unusually slowly for a Scotsman with only a mild accent so there's not really much of an excuse to not be able to follow what he is saying.

Duh what is that? Where do they speak it?

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quote:Originally posted by Richard

^ Listen to the BBC and you will hear standard English.

No I won't. There is no "standard" English. If you're talking about BBC standard, that's different. Nothing to do with us Canucks or our neighbours to the south.

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quote:Originally posted by Trillium

So are you saying Mo has a rural accent and is poorly educated ...having been a boy apprentice and not going on for his higher education credits ... ?

No, I'm not. I should have been more clear. What I meant was that I think Mo is very easy to understand. That's partly due to the fact that I'm used to Scots, and partly because of his Glasgow background. That is why I made a point of saying that Glaswegians are easier to understand than some other Scots.

Mo has been in North America a long time and is very media savvy. This may explain why the accent is weaker, his delivery is slower, and the relative absence of slang that is less well known here. This makes him an ok choice for TV work, but I still think that it will be difficult getting any real scoops out of him.

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quote:Originally posted by teddym

No I won't. There is no "standard" English. If you're talking about BBC standard, that's different. Nothing to do with us Canucks or our neighbours to the south.

An absurd comment. What you get taught in school is the standard form. Plenty of people in areas like the Maritimes or Appalachia use non-standard English in a North American context. The variations between the standards used in Canada, the United States, UK, Australia etc are minimal and should not impede understanding for anybody with a reasonable IQ.

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quote:Originally posted by BringBackTheBlizzard

An absurd comment. What you get taught in school is the standard form. Plenty of people in areas like the Maritimes or Appalachia use non-standard English in a North American context. The variations between the standards used in Canada, the United States, UK, Australia etc are minimal and should not impede understanding for anybody with a reasonable IQ.

You don’t really sound like you know what you’re talking about. I’m talking about spoken English, and the fact that there are as many “standards” as there are groups who speak the language (ie, no one "standard"). The rules, conventions etc. people were taught in school have little bearing on how easy/difficult they are to understand.

See, what happened was this: somebody joked that he might need English subtitles or a Scots to English translation service when Mo was speaking. I thought that was funny and picked up on it by saying Mo could use his accent to hide behind during an interview if he chose to. But I see now that I was wrong; because if a high-IQ type like yourself (and flatulent in Scots dialects to boot) were conducting the interview, then Mo would not have this escape route open to him.

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You'll be telling us next that you would need to be provided with subtitles to be able to understand Paul Hogan in Crocodile Dundee. A mild accent shouldn't be enough to impede understanding if standard English usage as taught in school is employed rather than non-standard dialect. I've only heard Mo Johnston move beyond having an accent to the point that he actually broke into Scottish dialect on one occasion when he lost his temper with Peter Mallett of the Globe and Mail over the question of fieldturf. For the most part he sticks to very short phrases and very simple vocabulary probably to make sure he is quoted correctly given the nature of his job.

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quote:Originally posted by BringBackTheBlizzard[:o)]

You'll be telling us next that you would need to be provided with subtitles to be able to understand Paul Hogan in Crocodile Dundee.

Nope, don't think so. And unless you're deaf or being willfully dense, you'll have to agree that Mo is a bit of a mutterer and sputterer--he doesn't open his mouth when he speaks, which can be both maddening and challenging to any listener.

quote:Originally posted by BringBackTheBlizzard

A mild accent shouldn't be enough to impede understanding if standard English usage as taught in school is employed rather than non-standard dialect. I've only heard Mo Johnston move beyond having an accent to the point that he actually broke into Scottish dialect on one occasion when he lost his temper with Peter Mallett of the Globe and Mail over the question of fieldturf. For the most part he sticks to very short phrases and very simple vocabulary probably to make sure he is quoted correctly given the nature of his job.

That's true for native speakers of English, but surely you're aware that a lot of TFC fans grew up in non-English speaking homes and have trouble understanding people with pronounced accents? Folks in this category are challenged by Mo's speech, and not because they don't have "a reasonable IQ" as you implied in an earlier post (Anglo-centric rubbish, that!). So to many TFC fans, Mo might as well be a little green man who just hopped out of a spaceship for all the sense he makes when he answers a question.

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Don't buy that for a minute. In my direct experience recent immigrants who are involved in soccer in southern Ontario can communicate with each other despite much stronger accents than Mo Johnston's based on the sort of simple vocabulary Mo Johnston uses when interviewed. If you wanted to have a go at Mo Johnston for drafting Ritchie Kotschau when he had a broken leg or signing Andy Welsh on the basis of games against NCAA teams you would get no argument from me. Accusing him of hiding behind a Scottish accent is laughable, however. There would be something seriously bizarre about somebody who moved to North America as an adult not having an accent. Do you see Arnold Schwarzenegger trying to sound like an American in his role as California's Governor?

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quote:Originally posted by BringBackTheBlizzard

Don't buy that for a minute.

You mean you don't get it--not the same thing.

quote:Originally posted by BringBackTheBlizzard

. . . Accusing him of hiding behind a Scottish accent is laughable . . .

Not as laughable as your reading comprehension, evidently. (Unless you're just setting up a straw man here. You wouldn't by any chance be doing that, would you?) Meanwhile, please show me where I accused Mo of "hiding behind a Scottish accent". I did say he could do it "if he chose to". Does that sound like an accusation to you? Show me the quote where I accused him and stop misrepresenting what I'm saying just for the sake of prolonging an argument.

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This is what you wrote above:-

I actually think Mo discovered long ago he could effectively use his accent as a survival mechanism, a kind of "protective coloration". I'd love to hear some of the interviews he must have given during his days in Kansas City or New York. (wtf did he say . . . ?)

I don't think I have any problems with reading comprehension.

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quote:Originally posted by BringBackTheBlizzard

This is what you wrote above:-

I actually think Mo discovered long ago he could effectively use his accent as a survival mechanism, a kind of "protective coloration". I'd love to hear some of the interviews he must have given during his days in Kansas City or New York. (wtf did he say . . . ?)

I don't think I have any problems with reading comprehension.

No? Well then where's the accusation? What you quoted was merely a tongue-in-cheek response to this:

“I just hope Lee Godfrey springs for a Scottish to English translation service</u> that can provide subtitles at the bottom of the screen when Mo speaks because Lord knows I can't make heads or tails of half of the stuff he says.”

Now as I thought I had explained to you earlier, that bit about the translation service was clearly not seriously meant--ask the poster if he was serious about hiring a translation service!--and so I interpreted it (correctly, I believe) as a jest, and I responded in kind. My post was not, I repeat, not to be construed as a serious attack on Mo. Can you understand that? Can you handle the idea--I know it sounds scandalous--of fans poking a little fun at Mo? Good. Then we understand each other.

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quote:Originally posted by teddym

No? Well then where's the accusation? What you quoted was merely a tongue-in-cheek response to this:

“I just hope Lee Godfrey springs for a Scottish to English translation service</u> that can provide subtitles at the bottom of the screen when Mo speaks because Lord knows I can't make heads or tails of half of the stuff he says.”

Now as I thought I had explained to you earlier, that bit about the translation service was clearly not seriously meant--ask the poster if he was serious about hiring a translation service!--and so I interpreted it (correctly, I believe) as a jest, and I responded in kind. My post was not, I repeat, not to be construed as a serious attack on Mo. Can you understand that? Can you handle the idea--I know it sounds scandalous--of fans poking a little fun at Mo? Good. Then we understand each other.

That's the way you now choose to portray things after the fact. Worth noting that my first post in this thread contained an emoticon, while your's did not and that you later wrote:-

you'll have to agree that Mo is a bit of a mutterer and sputterer--he doesn't open his mouth when he speaks, which can be both maddening and challenging to any listener.

and

a lot of TFC fans grew up in non-English speaking homes....Folks in this category are challenged by Mo's speech,

so you appear to me to want to have your cake and eat it too. There would be something seriously phoney if Mo Johnston didn't speak with a Scottish accent. Craig Ferguson doesn't try to hide his accent or where he is from as a talk show host on US network television:-

and given I am from much the same part of the world originally I know for a fact that he doesn't speak all that differently from the way he did when he was Bing Hitler Jr. back in Scotland. Only difference is that like Mo he makes an effort to be understood by speaking more slowly than is normal in Glasgow.

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quote:Originally posted by Whither Canada

They've hired somebody to do the translation:

:D

T'nks fur daht.

But yeah, like BringBackTheBlizzard wrote, speaking less than a 179 words a minute is dialing it back for The Southerners. That's easy.

Have I ever told my Two Old Ladies from Aberdeen visiting their friend at the Wee Elf's hospital story? Forget Trader Mo on GolTV, that was an instance requiring an English-English translator if ever their was one.

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