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How are new chants created in England?


Daniel

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I'm guessing that in other countries, coordinated efforts and communications within the ultras make for a new chant, but how do chants "start" in England, where there are no groups? Do you just start singing one and hope people around you pick it up? Are there forums people read? etc.

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Good start Daniel.In Holland the singing is related to Dutch history.Songs every kid knows from the school days.I guess Alloutte could be one of them if supplemented with some real punch lines.I would suggest a real sentimental Canadian song would do the trick.

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Hmmm. Don't know.

Much like johntv mentioned, some of the English/Scottish chants and songs are variations of broadly know songs. From "church" (C of E I'll assume, or other protestant congregations). Not exactly a church going bunch the English these days, but the baby boomers were so the youngers have inherited by accident I'd suppose, the canter of these adapted songs and adapted it themselves for their time and place.

You know this really is a fantastic topic, because the singing or chanting varies so much from place to place in England doesn't it? In some regions chanting, almost in the mono-tone NA tradition is the norm, and in others the melodies (whatever they are on the day) rule the roost.

Don't know. But I don't think very many get off the ground except by trial and error at the grounds. We only ever hear the successful ones, the lame ducks die an early death in the grandstands.

P.S. And absolutely agree with johntv on the Alloutte song everyone has learn at one time or another in grade school. When the lads were jumping and singing it all together after winning the Gold Cup I thought, well this is it. The Canadian mens national team song. Hasn't really caught on though.

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In England, most new songs get spread around the stadium by a small group. A group of a dozen guys will start singing and then everyone else joins in - it's that simple. Some catch on and some don't - it all depends how charged the crowd is etc.

As for the songs that are made up, a lot of them are popular rock or pop songs from over the years that can be developed into a good but not tackey sounding chant. Certainly at Chelsea, some of our songs come from the opposition and are then turned around and used against them whenever we play them (as per the Liverpool game yesterday).

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Great topic!

How a song is CREATED in England:

Step 1: Some mates have a few in a pub

Step 2: Someone states that a certain player or team is either "Bloody Brilliant!" or "Bloody ****e!"

Seriously, I think alot of songs are started by a few inside a stadium, and the best survive - pure Darwinism. It can be a real heartfelt song that is full of historical/sentimental importance ("You'll Never Walk Alone"), or an adaptation of a popular song to either praise or attack (Monty Python's "Always Look on the Bright Side of Life" turned into the very distasteful anti-ManU "Always Look on the Runway for Ice").

Lyrics put to a familiar tune probably have the best chance. Pure Canadiana would be the best choice. In July, a member of U-Sector (Canadian_Bhoy), came up with a great Toronto FC chant that I love and hope they will use. If not, then it would work great for the MNT.

Sung to the theme of "The Littlest Hobo":

Maybe tomorrow

We're going to win the cup

Until tomorrow

We'll just keep getting drunk!

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No answer to your question, but my contribution (to the tune of a theme song that people who grew up in Ontario during the 70s and 80s should know, The Polka Dot Door):

Toronto FC

Toronto FC

We're the fans of Toronto FC

We'll sing as Toronto scores 1, 2, 3

Do do do do do doo

Toronto FC

(Sorry about the earworm.)

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It's pretty clear how the more simple chants/songs get created -- its totally spontaneous. Any of us that have watched games in packed pubs knows that it only takes 1 person a few seconds to get 300 or 500 people singing a simple chant, even if that song was just made-up at that moment. And once you have 500 people singing its easy to see how it can expand to 5000+.

For example, remember when Graham Poll did his first match in England after the World Cup? Everytime he produced a yellow-card the stadium chanted:

"Two-more!

You only need two more,

You only need two more."

Clearly, that's something that was just thought up on the spot, and it picked-up quickly.

For more complicated songs like "Fields of Anfied Road", there obviously was some planning and coordination done by a group of people outside the grounds.

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It's pretty clear how the more simple chants/songs get created -- its totally spontaneous. Any of us that have watched games in packed pubs knows that it only takes 1 person a few seconds to get 300 or 500 people singing a simple chant, even if that song was just made-up at that moment. And once you have 500 people singing its easy to see how it can expand to 5000+.

For example, remember when Graham Poll did his first match in England after the World Cup? Everytime he produced a yellow-card the stadium chanted:

"Two-more!

You only need two more,

You only need two more."

Clearly, that's something that was just thought up on the spot, and it picked-up quickly.

For more complicated songs like "Fields of Anfied Road", there obviously was some planning and coordination done by a group of people outside the grounds.

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Guest Jeffery S.

Funny this question, just today I watched a long clip on the Liverpool site (subscribers only) by the singer of The Farm, a longtime Kop resident, where he goes through the top 20 fan songs, in his opinion.

Interesting the variety of ways songs get put together. Many are invented in bars amongst friends. Some are special to away game travelling, others specifically thought up before a big European match (A Scouser in Gay Paris). Some are only sung in bars but never get to the Kop. A great majority use existing music. Others begin with a rhyme on a player's name (Garcia and Sangria is one they've heard lately, silly but logical).

You have to remember that there is a similar tradition in union songs, but since there are no decent general strikes anymore we don't get to sing such things collectively on the streets of our great cities. I recall song sheets being handed out before the BC general strike vs. Van der Zalm, guess that was back in 85 or 86? But it is rare to see songsheets in a stadium, usually a small group of supporter have to persist until the others learn the lyrics. If they are interested. There are many songs that die the first day in the trenches, some of them I would imagine quite good.

Just to agree on fans turning around the other team's songs. Happens quite often with Barça's hymn, where they insult the team and end up calling out "Mierda, mierda, mier-da!" instead of the team name. I have heard this at Espanyol games but since the music is more compelling than any alternate words, I think it does not work, I hear Barça where they say "****". Better is the great Real Madrid chant, from the glory days of the early 60s, "Así, así, así gana Madrid", translated roughly "That's the way, that's the way, that's the way Madrid wins!", chanted whenever Madrid is unfairly favoured by a reffing decision in an away game.

The Andalusians, who are often singing in bars to flamenco beats, are always creating new songs and adapting them, you get quite complex stuff sung to syncopated clapping at Betis games, or in Cadiz.

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quote:Originally posted by marktci

No answer to your question, but my contribution (to the tune of a theme song that people who grew up in Ontario during the 70s and 80s should know, The Polka Dot Door):

Toronto FC

Toronto FC

We're the fans of Toronto FC

We'll sing as Toronto scores 1, 2, 3

Do do do do do doo

Toronto FC

(Sorry about the earworm.)

Brilliant! [8D]

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