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Toronto Lynx Article in German Football Mag


Steve B

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I don't have time to translate the article but I laughed my head off reading it. I have never been to a Lynx home game but from what I have heard from the many posts, this author seems to have described it perfectly. Some highlights: Toronto has many soccer players and fans many of whom are very interested in soccer from their native land but not in the Lynx. The mascot game at halftime overshadows the actual game. This is followed by a very funny description of the mascot game and the comment that this is the level to which soccer can sink. Then a description of the poor level of play in the 2nd half particularly from the Lynx which does not seem to bother the young fans who are more interested in the t-shirts being thrown into the crowd by the mascots. Then the comment that luckily for the Lynx they can not be relegated from this league and the sarcastic comment that "everyone's a winner."

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What is he supposed to write then, Richard? Is he supposed to lie and say it was an excellent display of soccer before a large and knowledgeable fan base? The game is only funny and embarrassing because the Lynx make it so. The Lynx should be happy anybody is writing about them because certainly no one in Canada is, for which they can mostly blame themselves. I would have no problem by the way if they did something like the mascot game once a year as it might be a funny and odd attraction. The problem is that everygame is some sort of farcical show and there is no emphasis on the soccer being played or creating a soccer atmosphere. At one point you would think the Hartrells would look at their attendance figures and realize that their marketing strategy is not working.

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The Raptors mascot in the half-time game had one of the most dirty - and therefore hilarious - tackles on another mascot (I think it was Carlton the Bear) in this game. Several of the Ultras pissed in their pants from laughing so hard.

Difficult to argue with what the article says. The good news is, its now 2006 - MLS is coming to Toronto next year! Woo hoo!

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You advocate hanging out one's dirty washing for the entire world to see then?

I could understand if this was a writer who travelled here from Germany to observe and write about his experiences, but if this was a Canadian who deliberately wrote such an article for publication in a foreign journal then he should be acutely embarrassed at his lack of taste and pride. Perhaps you and he would rather see the total demise of the Lynx then?

I would certainly not be boasting about this 'achievement' if I were the friend of the author.

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The job of a journalist is to write the truth not to change or ignore stories because they portray something negatively. If Gianluca, one of the Lynx biggest supporters, says it is hard to argue with what the article says why are you upset with it. If the Toronto or Canadian media wrote articles like this maybe this would inspire the Lynx to change. I should be the one upset by this not you because when I go to Germany I hear how they think our soccer is low level, amateuristic and funny and this will only reinforce this view. However, although we have a few stronger national team players than most Europeans think, by and large their viewpoint is correct. He might have been able to write a bit more positive article had he attended an Impact or Whitecaps game but he is not writing on the budget of the New York Times. This is an accurate portrayal of the state of pro soccer in Toronto. Don't shoot the messanger. Hopefully the MLS team will be run in a much more professional manner.

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This article is too true and yes definitely worth a laugh. But really - its message very clearly and accurately portrays the Lynx's unprofessionalism in a "professional" league. I can speak from first hand experience, this is exactly what the Ultras (back when I used to attend the games) always said. It was always hard to understand why the crowd would cheer louder for Donuts than for a great pass. Congrats for writing about the truth! AND THANK YOU that the MLS is coming.

And the comment from Richard the he could understand this article if it was written by a journalist that travelled from Germany but not from a native journalist is pretty hard to swallow. I'm sorry but what does this have to do with pride? Is pride all about not telling the truth? I think not. Perhaps its because of people like you who are obviously willing to accept mediocrity that professional soccer in Canada isn't professional. What a joke!

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If it please you lot somehow to belittle Canadian soccer than no wonder we are in the sad state we are. Why did this author chose to send his piece to a German publication rather than publish it locally where he may actually achieve something positive and constructive which certainly won't happen by publishing offshore in a foreign language. I think it was excruciatingly poor taste and bad form but then from what I have seen of some in the Canadian soccer community that is hardly surprising, they wouldn't know what good taste was if it slapped them in the face.

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Definition of belittle: to cause (a person or thing) to seem little or less. I.e to belittle Canadian soccer he would have to be making it seem worse than it is. He is reporting on the actual present state of Canadian soccer. This is the reality for 1/3 of our professional teams. While the other two may be somewhat more professional they are still playing in a poor league with poor stadiums. Maybe he should publish this article in english in a canadian media source although I can imagine it might be difficult to find a media outlet interested in the story. I would like more articles like this to be published both here and abroad because maybe it would embarass some people to do something about the situation. A similar article about the ridiculous WCQ campaign would be a good start and something we have also not seen from the Canadian media.

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What was achieved by publishing this article in German in Germany other than belittling Canada? I am all for promoting the standard of the game at all levels in Canada but this kind of trashing of the best we have to offer does nothing positive or constructive whatosoever.

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It says in the sub headline that there is no city in North America that has a bigger heart for soccer than Toronto also referring back to the large multi cultural make up of Toronto.

It is a good aticle and somewhat funny.

So let's not carried away.

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The author of the article is a Canadian who has attended many Lynx games with me since their inaugural season in 1997.

Richard, you are of course entitled to your opinion, but I think it is a little harsh to say that a piece focussing on a gameday experience at a Toronto Lynx game belittles Canada or is in bad taste. As Grizzly rightly points out, where in Canada could you publish a piece like this? In any event, 11 Freunde is widely available in one of the great soccer-playing nations of the world - its the most high-profile exposure the Lynx have ever received, so that is a good thing (unless our great victory over a hungover 1860 Munich received extensive coverage in Kicker that I missed).

Looking over my Lynx progams, I have been to about 75-80 Lynx games since 1997 and I can tell you that the article is a fairly accurate representation of the farcical gameday antics that have been a feature of this franchise. So what's wrong with humourous depiction of that experience?

That being said, I am amazed how consistent the clubs marketing endeavours are, given how spectacularly they have failed. I have been to a half dozen money-spinning school days (all taken as holiday days from work) knowing full well those kids don't watch the game and won't be coming back with their parents. I've been to no less than five "fiesta latinas". After so many years, I almost look forward to the silliness of it all (at least from the safe distance of Centennial's east-side grassy kop). I find it strangely comforting to know that there will be another "Emergency Services Night" in 2006 after learning over the loudspeaker how to approach strange dogs from a kindly OPP officer at last year's version. The Lynx teach us about so much more than football. I've learned a great deal about frustration, for example...

That being said (and I don't speak for the author of the article here) I am a proud Lynx supporter and will continue to be a season-ticket holder because I like my football live and want Canadian soccer to thrive. This article will not in any way be hazardous to the health of professional soccer in Toronto or Canada. We can safely append to it the disclaimer "No minor soccer-playing countries were hurt in the production of this article".

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My German is too rusty (yes I was reasonably fluent many years ago when employed by Siemens) to read the original article with any ease so was relying on the precis given here. If that precis has misrepresented the original article then I apologise to the author for some perhaps overly harsh criticism. I do wonder why the author chose to focus on that particular aspect of Canadian soccer however which is so clearly a different culture from that found at European games and not uncommon at North American sports events generally.

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quote:Originally posted by Steve B

After so many years, I almost look forward to the silliness of it all (at least from the safe distance of Centennial's east-side grassy kop). I find it strangely comforting to know that there will be another "Emergency Services Night" in 2006 after learning over the loudspeaker how to approach strange dogs from a kindly OPP officer at last year's version.

It must have been one of the better days for the Centennial loudspeaker system if you could hear it from the grassy knoll on the east side of the field. We could barely hear the loudspeaker at all from the south side of the stands last year, even though the sound was originating from our side of the field. Usually we only hear about every fifth word of the national anthem because the sound system keeps cutting out. Though considering the quality of some of the anthem singers last year (including one Canadian Idol reject with dreadlocks who walked right out of the stadium after his "performance") that was occasionally a blessing in disguise.

The mascot game is far and away the best half-time entertainment the Lynx put out each season. Some might remove the "half-time" qualifier from the previous statement. It is un-missable, and I encourage MLSE to steal this idea from the Lynx for MLS matches, its the one good idea they can take from the Lynx (other than playing Edgar Bartolomeu on the wing).

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quote:Originally posted by Richard

My German is too rusty (yes I was reasonably fluent many years ago when employed by Siemens) to read the original article with any ease so was relying on the precis given here. If that precis has misrepresented the original article then I apologise to the author for some perhaps overly harsh criticism. I do wonder why the author chose to focus on that particular aspect of Canadian soccer however which is so clearly a different culture from that found at European games and not uncommon at North American sports events generally.

Aha, now I see I am apparently to blame for you having an opinion that no one else agrees with. Very interesting.

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quote:Originally posted by Steve B

I have been to a half dozen money-spinning school days (all taken as holiday days from work) knowing full well those kids don't watch the game and won't be coming back with their parents.

I've been to exactly one school day and it put a friend of mine off going to games with me and absolutely horrified a group of travelling English adolescent soccer players. Now that was a disservice to the game in this country, because it was an extreme example, but it was so painful and bizarre not to talk about. Hell it was six years ago and I still can't shake how shrill the noise of thousands of 12 year-olds screaming for free t-shirts is.

I'd wager money that there were about five people in that crowd of 8,000 or whatever it was that even remember the score in that game. It's hardly the author's fault for pointing out what Lynx games are like (and given the people I know who attend, my experience I wouldn't say this article is embellishing).

cheers,

matthew

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