Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Moosehead

New Canadian League Thread...

Recommended Posts

quote:Originally posted by Robert

800,000+ Psyches (according to the CSA). You're right, I don't like it.

To illustrate my point yet further, there were 121,000+ registered soccer players (all ages) in British Columbia in 2003 (figure from CSA website), yet Chris J. Vaughan Griffiths, Vancouver based publisher of one of the best soccer publications around, struggles to break even with World Football Pages, let alone make a living. Only a tiny proportion of the much vaunted 800,000+ across Canada give a rat's ass about anything to do with soccer beyond their own immediate, personal involvement. Anybody looking to build a business based on drawing spectators to professional soccer events MUST take that fact into account.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:Originally posted by Richard

To illustrate my point yet further, there were 121,000+ registered soccer players (all ages) in British Columbia in 2003 (figure from CSA website), yet Chris J. Vaughan Griffiths, Vancouver based publisher of one of the best soccer publications around, struggles to break even with World Football Pages, let alone make a living. Only a tiny proportion of the much vaunted 800,000+ across Canada give a rat's ass about anything to do with soccer beyond their own immediate, personal involvement. Anybody looking to build a business based on drawing spectators to professional soccer events MUST take that fact into account.

So to illustrate your point even further, if the creator of POSTERBOYstruggles with these numbers, why should we build larger stadiums? When are you going to take off your blinders and wake up to the fact that larger stadiums aren't going to change a thing. Like, "Hey Margret, let me take you out to our new super-duper stadium. Oh, and by the way, there's going to be a soccer game happening there too." To illustrate that point even further, we get ten stupid billionaires (God only knows where we're going to find them) and get them to build ten super-duper stadiums, but just like POSTERBOY the current numbers will give us ten white elephants that will sooner or later get torn down due to Canadian real-estate values. Now I ask you Richard, what what would be worst for Canadian soccer, another attempt at starting up a modest league that might fail, but just maybe may succeed, or ten white elephants. No, please don't give me that adolescent POSTERBOY salute. I guess if your the only soccer publication around, that also makes you the best soccer publication around.:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sigh.... Robert, do I have to post them AGAIN.

Key elements absolutely essential to the success of any national professional league include:

1. Proponents - the long-term support of a financially-capable, qualified ownership/management group.

2. Long-term financing support - sufficient financial resources to ensure the stability of the league and inevitable operating losses.

3. Venues - must be commensurate with a professional league.

4. Organization structure - must be managed in a professional manner by people with directly relevant expertise and no conflicts of interest.

There are many more factors but these are by far the most important. Anybody with half a gram of business savvy will recognise this. If any one of these elements is absent the chances of success are drastically diminished and each is as important as the other. You will note that venues is but one of these four. Now, if you're talking about lower level regional leagues employing semi-pros and/or high level amateurs, and drawing in the hundreds at the gate rather than the thousands, then obviously some of these factors become much less important including the quality of venue. Witness the PCSL and CPSL.

I really don't care what you feel about WFP and I agree with you 100% about the rather sad depiction of childhood, parenthood and a segment of the soccer community that is posterboy. My point was that no professional league has any hope of surviving in Canada if it relies solely on the diehard enthusiast supporter who will endure all kinds of discomfort and inconvenience for the love of the game. WFP was targetted in the beginning at just such a narrow readership and it struggled. Now that the publisher has toned down the edginess and is including some local youth coverage amongst other things i.e. he is catering to that broader public which I have been trying to say must be the target market for a pro league, his sales are increasing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:Originally posted by Richard

WFP was targetted in the beginning at just such a narrow readership and it struggled. Now that the publisher has toned down the edginess and is including some local youth coverage amongst other things i.e. he is catering to that broader public which I have been trying to say must be the target market for a pro league, his sales are increasing.

"Toned down the edginess". You mean not featuring Current Champ in the photos anymore?;)

0604-md-jesse-cone.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:Originally posted by Richard

Sigh.... Robert, do I have to post them AGAIN.

Key elements absolutely essential to the success of any national professional league include:

1. Proponents - the long-term support of a financially-capable, qualified ownership/management group.

2. Long-term financing support - sufficient financial resources to ensure the stability of the league and inevitable operating losses.

3. Venues - must be commensurate with a professional league.

4. Organization structure - must be managed in a professional manner by people with directly relevant expertise and no conflicts of interest.

There are many more factors but these are by far the most important. Anybody with half a gram of business savvy will recognise this. If any one of these elements is absent the chances of success are drastically diminished and each is as important as the other. You will note that venues is but one of these four. Now, if you're talking about lower level regional leagues employing semi-pros and/or high level amateurs, and drawing in the hundreds at the gate rather than the thousands, then obviously some of these factors become much less important including the quality of venue. Witness the PCSL and CPSL.

I really don't care what you feel about WFP and I agree with you 100% about the rather sad depiction of childhood, parenthood and a segment of the soccer community that is posterboy. My point was that no professional league has any hope of surviving in Canada if it relies solely on the diehard enthusiast supporter who will endure all kinds of discomfort and inconvenience for the love of the game. WFP was targetted in the beginning at just such a narrow readership and it struggled. Now that the publisher has toned down the edginess and is including some local youth coverage amongst other things i.e. he is catering to that broader public which I have been trying to say must be the target market for a pro league, his sales are increasing.

I said the same thing to Chris when he first started out. But he wants to hang on to that bad boy image. Now we have to put up with POSTERGRANNY giving us the finger. Once, okay, maybe it's funny, Chris. Getting hung-up on images becomes boring rather quickly. I'll give Chris credit though, he suits up and shows up every month. He's doing his thing, albeit with alot of public whining like the world owes him something. I have a copy of all 50 issues, but I have probably only read a third of them. Once Chris improves his read on the Canadian soccer market, I'm sure he'll be more successful with his little rag. I'm expecting a great U20 issue.

As far as your ideas on Canada's soccer future are concerned, I wish you and all those like you, the best of luck in your quest to acquire the four key elements absolutely essential to the success of any national professional league. Please don't leave the rest of the Canadian soccer community in the dark on your progress. You have the support of a National Association that you believe in. Once you succeed I will be happy to attend matches in professional stadiums, owned by rich business savvy (at least more than 1/2 gram's worth) individuals. Any idea on what the ticket prices will be for this state of the art, right out of the (crackerjack) box soccer enterprise?[^]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:Originally posted by Richard

Sigh.... Robert, do I have to post them AGAIN.

Key elements absolutely essential to the success of any national professional league include:

1. Proponents - the long-term support of a financially-capable, qualified ownership/management group.

2. Long-term financing support - sufficient financial resources to ensure the stability of the league and inevitable operating losses.

3. Venues - must be commensurate with a professional league.

4. Organization structure - must be managed in a professional manner by people with directly relevant expertise and no conflicts of interest.

There are many more factors but these are by far the most important. Anybody with half a gram of business savvy will recognise this. If any one of these elements is absent the chances of success are drastically diminished and each is as important as the other. You will note that venues is but one of these four. Now, if you're talking about lower level regional leagues employing semi-pros and/or high level amateurs, and drawing in the hundreds at the gate rather than the thousands, then obviously some of these factors become much less important including the quality of venue. Witness the PCSL and CPSL.

I really don't care what you feel about WFP and I agree with you 100% about the rather sad depiction of childhood, parenthood and a segment of the soccer community that is posterboy. My point was that no professional league has any hope of surviving in Canada if it relies solely on the diehard enthusiast supporter who will endure all kinds of discomfort and inconvenience for the love of the game. WFP was targetted in the beginning at just such a narrow readership and it struggled. Now that the publisher has toned down the edginess and is including some local youth coverage amongst other things i.e. he is catering to that broader public which I have been trying to say must be the target market for a pro league, his sales are increasing.

I said the same thing to Chris when he first started out. But he wants to hang on to that bad boy image. Now we have to put up with POSTERGRANNY giving us the finger. Once, okay, maybe it's funny, Chris. Getting hung-up on images becomes boring rather quickly. I'll give Chris credit though, he suits up and shows up every month. He's doing his thing, albeit with alot of public whining like the world owes him something. I have a copy of all 50 issues, but I have probably only read a third of them. Once Chris improves his read on the Canadian soccer market, I'm sure he'll be more successful with his little rag. I'm expecting a great U20 issue.

As far as your ideas on Canada's soccer future are concerned, I wish you and all those like you, the best of luck in your quest to acquire the four key elements absolutely essential to the success of any national professional league. Please don't leave the rest of the Canadian soccer community in the dark on your progress. You have the support of a National Association that you believe in. Once you succeed I will be happy to attend matches in professional stadiums, owned by rich business savvy (at least more than 1/2 gram's worth) individuals. Any idea on what the ticket prices will be for this state of the art, right out of the (crackerjack) box soccer enterprise?[^]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As for a national pro league - your attempt at overdone sarcasm is unwarranted Robert - I am not one of those who is clammering for a pro league to be conjured up by the CSA or anybody else, much as I'd like to see it happen. Any Canadian pro league must be built using sound business principles otherwise it will go the same way as all previous attempts at pro leagues in Canada no matter how much you and others might wish otherwise. Until then I will support my local USL franchise and continue to work hard developing high level regional leagues and cultivating interest in and enthusiasm for high level soccer amongst the general public. This includes supporting Chris and his WFP that you seem to like to hate so much and Alfons Rubbens and his Inside SOCCER magazine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoy reading stuff on this forum on a regular basis but I hardly post. Plus, I'm always hoping for some good juicy stuff pertaining to a national league so I naturally gravitate to this thread. However, I always read the same old same old and it gets tired.

There always the same type of of comments or opinions.

1. we need the CSA to be involved

2. We don't need the CSA, we need money

3. We need stadiums

3. We need regional before national

4. We need to learn from our mistakes

5. blah blah blah

Why can't we come up with a solution? What were the mistakes that were made? I hardly read of the bad decisions the CSL made because I don't think anyone here honestly knows what decisions were made. Let's start listing all the major mistakes that have been made.

Lets make a SWOT analysis of a potential national league. Why don't we make 4 threads for each heading and sticky them; Strenghts, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

And please, let us not post any more lists of potential cities with fake team names with x amount of divisions.

My personal opinion is that we will never have a league if profits or revenues are directly linked to gate receipts. We need to look at other options or sources of revenue. The major 3 leagues in the US all have large TV and merch deals and do not have to rely as much on gate. We don't have that luxury but we have to look at these sorts of revenue streams (even the NHL has this problem). I wonder if gaming is an option for a league. Maybe we could position the league closer to Horse racing or Jai Alai. Have slot machines at stadiums and people could bet on which team will win. Kinda far fetched and possibly illegal but could it work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest HamiltonSteelers

Danny Boy,

I agree with much of what you say. Linking revenues directly to the gate is, for me, the easiest means of gauging the success or failure of the other revenue streams. You can get more for advertising when 2000 people show up than you can for 500. That being said, I don't believe that the stadium issue is all that bad. Sure, they are not the calibre of the bottom division in Engerland, but they are functional.

Strengths : National TV deal. TSN, I felt, took a huge leap into this league but it was of great timing. TSN was new, needed some Can-con for their TV and I'm sure the rights could be had at a VERY reasonable rate for a new league rising from the recent demise of the NASL. This elevated the national game and national team to a level of exposure that was rather high (given that following the NASL predates my awareness).

Strength: Talent. At the bare minimum, I do believe that there is enough Canadian talent worthy to be paid at a good semi-pro level, if not higher, for 10 clubs. I estimate that the Pacific League has just as many quality calibre sides as the CPSL does, and that's probably 5 in each.

Threat: Splintering factions. Between the CPSL, PCSL, USL, PDL, another league on the map could backfire in cities that have one of these clubs. If the Whitecaps/Impact/Lynx don't make the jump, would a new team draw the media and the public in to compete? Do clubs in the CPSL and PCSL have an exclucivity clauses (only one professional team in Stadium X) which would limit the facilities' accessibility.

I'll have to think on this one a little more, but you pose an excellent proposition by shedding a little clarity on what the focus should be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:Originally posted by HamiltonSteelers

Danny Boy,

I agree with much of what you say. Linking revenues directly to the gate is, for me, the easiest means of gauging the success or failure of the other revenue streams. You can get more for advertising when 2000 people show up than you can for 500. That being said, I don't believe that the stadium issue is all that bad. Sure, they are not the calibre of the bottom division in Engerland, but they are functional.

Strengths : National TV deal. TSN, I felt, took a huge leap into this league but it was of great timing. TSN was new, needed some Can-con for their TV and I'm sure the rights could be had at a VERY reasonable rate for a new league rising from the recent demise of the NASL. This elevated the national game and national team to a level of exposure that was rather high (given that following the NASL predates my awareness).

Strength: Talent. At the bare minimum, I do believe that there is enough Canadian talent worthy to be paid at a good semi-pro level, if not higher, for 10 clubs. I estimate that the Pacific League has just as many quality calibre sides as the CPSL does, and that's probably 5 in each.

Threat: Splintering factions. Between the CPSL, PCSL, USL, PDL, another league on the map could backfire in cities that have one of these clubs. If the Whitecaps/Impact/Lynx don't make the jump, would a new team draw the media and the public in to compete? Do clubs in the CPSL and PCSL have an exclucivity clauses (only one professional team in Stadium X) which would limit the facilities' accessibility.

I'll have to think on this one a little more, but you pose an excellent proposition by shedding a little clarity on what the focus should be.

I like the tone of where Danny Boy is going with this discussion, and I agree with HamiltonSteelers, that it is important to commence a new league with existing teams rather than creating everything from scratch. This way the clubs already have an identity and a following within their communities. I think it would be prudent to consider starting-up as a semi-pro league for several reasons. The financial obligations of payrolls might deter clubs with a potential to be successful in the future from entering the league due to the fact that today they could not support such an expense. A quota of having a minimum number of amateurs on the field could also be considered. This would provide a serious opportunity for those on the cusp of an amateur or pro career, and give managers a chance to evaluate this talent under competitive conditions. On the other hand, it might be better not to impose any restrictions regarding pro or amateur composition of teams, and give each club the autonomy to decide what works best for them. I also don't feel that Canada is ready to support a full professional soccer league, and that this could only evolve from a semi-pro league over the course of time that it would take. Rome was not built in a day, and neither will a pro-league materialize overnight, there are just too many obstacles to overcome initially. If five year sponsorship deals could be negociated by the league to initially cover the travelling expenses of all the teams involved, and in addition if clubs paid an entries fee that would cover a period of equal length, then this would go a long ways in laying a foundation to ensure the league's survival during the crucial first five years of its existence. If such a league manages to get off the ground with x number of clubs, then I believe that it should involve the x strongest clubs in Canada, which would mean that the Whitecaps, Lynx and Impact would have to be involved, in addition to the x strongest clubs from the CPSL and the PCSL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a start...Please add as you see fit.

STRENGTHS:

1) Good organizational infrastructure across Canada ie. provincial and local associations

2) Talent base

3) Strong existing Clubs that are ambitious

WEAKNESSES:

1) Weak national association

2) Weak public (media) image of sport

3) No identifiable Owners for a full fledged national league

4) Weak track record of paid attendance

OPPORTUNITIES:

1) Creation of strong regional leagues to serve as second division is feasible and will provided the immediate base for any future 'National League'

2) 2007 will provide buzz, but action needs to be taken (if MLS had waited a year to launch it would have lost any momentum the WC 94 provided)

THREATS:

1) Existing associations may not be keen to support any new ventures as they prefer to extend their own influence and power

2) No guarantee of a TV deal or positive media coverage. How much coverage did the Aviators and Mustangs receive locally?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:Originally posted by River City

Here's a start...Please add as you see fit.

STRENGTHS:

1) Good organizational infrastructure across Canada ie. provincial and local associations

2) Talent base

3) Strong existing Clubs that are ambitious

WEAKNESSES:

1) Weak national association

2) Weak public (media) image of sport

3) No identifiable Owners for a full fledged national league

4) Weak track record of paid attendance

OPPORTUNITIES:

1) Creation of strong regional leagues to serve as second division is feasible and will provided the immediate base for any future 'National League'

2) 2007 will provide buzz, but action needs to be taken (if MLS had waited a year to launch it would have lost any momentum the WC 94 provided)

THREATS:

1) Existing associations may not be keen to support any new ventures as they prefer to extend their own influence and power

2) No guarantee of a TV deal or positive media coverage. How much coverage did the Aviators and Mustangs receive locally?

If Quecbe, Ontario and British Columbia form the three largest soccer markets in Canada, then the provincial associations of each of these three provinces would most definately need to get involved in the formation of a National league. Each of these provinces already has an established pro soccer club, and to get them involved would require a proposal that is at least equally as attractive as the current situation they find themselves in. For instance, why would a Mr. Kerfoot entertain the notion of transferring the Whitecaps from the USL to a new league? Maybe a new league would need to proved itself over a prolonged period of time before any of the Big 3 clubs would even consider joining. Although I personally believe that starting a new league would benefit from the experience the Big 3 would have to offer. An idea that I personally like is that each of these three cities (Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver) have a second team in the league. Having a local rivalry would creat a greater soccer interest in each city and it would add four games to the schedule which would require minimal cost and travelling time. In Vancouver, a second team could be the UBC Thunderbirds. Thunderbird Stadium and Swangard Stadium are within easy reach of most residents of the lower mainland. Local media coverage, local advertising and local commuting all become more attractive. I'm sure that similar opportunities exist for having a second team in Toronto and Montreal. I like River City's idea of striking while the iron is hot. 2008 would be a realistic target to set for launching a league on the heels of the World Youth Championships. Interest will still be fresh, especially if the public is made aware well in advance of a National League starting up. They should be constantly informed and updated on the progress of the upcoming league.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Whitecaps have entered their reserve/development men's and women's teams in the PCSL this season. This is a good start. Maybe the Impact and Lynx could enter reserve teams in the CPSL?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the estimate of the realistic cost of participating for each team in this league you're imagining?

From where would the revenues come to cover these costs?

If the revenues are insufficient to cover the costs which they very likely will be, where will the long term financing come from?

What venues do you have in mind, are they available?

These are all pertinent questions even if the players are all amateur and not paid any wages.

It only gets worse if the players are to be paid anything.

If I were running a club, any club, and was approached by a group wanting me to participate in such a league, these would be the very first questions I would ask, followed by 'where is the business plan?'. If the group didn't have convincing answers I would tell them to go away, don't waste my time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard,

I think your points are covered mainly by W3. Any owner or ownership group coming in to the league would have to answer those questions for himself/themselves. However I have added them to the original list (W5,6 and T3) as someone else might be able to offer some issue specific solutions ie. what realistic revenue streams might be.

STRENGTHS:

1) Good organizational infrastructure across Canada ie. provincial and local associations

2) Talent base

3) Strong existing Clubs that are ambitious

WEAKNESSES:

1) Weak national association

2) Weak public (media) image of sport

3) No identifiable Owners for a full fledged national league

4) Weak track record of paid attendance

5) Lack of identifiable and inexpensive facilities

6) Lack of identifiable revenue streams for Clubs

OPPORTUNITIES:

1) Creation of strong regional leagues to serve as second division is feasible and will provided the immediate base for any future 'National League'

2) 2007 will provide buzz, but action needs to be taken (if MLS had waited a year to launch it would have lost any momentum the WC 94 provided)

THREATS:

1) Existing associations may not be keen to support any new ventures as they prefer to extend their own influence and power

2) No guarantee of a TV deal or positive media coverage. How much coverage did the Aviators and Mustangs receive locally?

3) Startup costs will undoubtedly keep many groups at bay

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good, let me get the ball rolling. I suggest that for a team comprising unpaid players, run by volunteers recouping only their direct expenses and coaching staff paid only an honorarium to participate in a regional 12 team league, an operating budget of $50,000 to $100,000 would be a reasonable starting point. This does not include the cost of participation in any national cup championship or travel outside of the region and careful management will be required to keep within such a budget as costs escalate very quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:Originally posted by Richard

What is the estimate of the realistic cost of participating for each team in this league you're imagining?

From where would the revenues come to cover these costs?

If the revenues are insufficient to cover the costs which they very likely will be, where will the long term financing come from?

What venues do you have in mind, are they available?

These are all pertinent questions even if the players are all amateur and not paid any wages.

It only gets worse if the players are to be paid anything.

If I were running a club, any club, and was approached by a group wanting me to participate in such a league, these would be the very first questions I would ask, followed by 'where is the business plan?'. If the group didn't have convincing answers I would tell them to go away, don't waste my time.

This is exactly the type of thing I have problems with. #1 suggests this league, the #2 says ,where's the money, stadium blah blah blah. We need to get away from this. You guys are starting to add to this SWOT list which is cool. This can lead to us perhaps coming up with the business plan. It's time to start thinking about what we can do instead of pipe dreaming.

STRENGTHS:

1) Good organizational infrastructure across Canada ie. provincial and local associations

2) Talent base

3) Strong existing Clubs that are ambitious

4) First world economy, capitalist society

5) Strong sports coverage across Canada (media)

6) Strong University league in place(amateur league for draft purposes)

7) Proliferation and acceptance of field turf, season extension. Longer season = more revenue.

WEAKNESSES:

1) Weak national association

2) Weak public (media) image of sport

3) No identifiable Owners for a full fledged national league

4) Weak track record of paid attendance

5) Lack of identifiable and inexpensive facilities

6) Lack of identifiable revenue streams for Clubs

7) Short season

OPPORTUNITIES:

1) Creation of strong regional leagues to serve as second division is feasible and will provided the immediate base for any future 'National League'

2) 2007 will provide buzz, but action needs to be taken (if MLS had waited a year to launch it would have lost any momentum the WC 94 provided)

3) league could obtain marketing databses through soccer schools and combined efforts with local associations

4) Get markting mentorship from NHL. NHL offseason = Soccer season. If Yankees and Man U can be partners....

THREATS:

1) Existing associations may not be keen to support any new ventures as they prefer to extend their own influence and power

2) No guarantee of a TV deal or positive media coverage. How much coverage did the Aviators and Mustangs receive locally?

3) Startup costs will undoubtedly keep many groups at bay

4) Competition fom MLS, A-League, and Europe (keeping talent)

5) American influence on our infrastructure. Canadian League vs. MLS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest HamiltonSteelers

Strength: Global marketing - Adidas, Nike, Puma are all brands that would be willing to jump aboard a project with a long term goal. I realize with the marketing deal that Adidas signed with MLS is huge, and that a similar sponsorship would be marginal at best, but it does show that if the stability is there, long-term corporations would be on board.

Strength: Foreign club influence - With Man Utd., Ajax and others sure to follow actively seeking out new places to nurture talent, a possible link up to various clubs would be/could be a realization. At best, for talent and sponsorship, or at least, providing infrastructure.

Threats: CFL's rise in popularity/competing with the summer entertainment dollar. I realize that this is a stretch, but all networks in Canada are salivating at the CFL numbers that are drawn, which could lessen the likelihood of a TV deal, lessen interest in a growing game, etc.

Opportunities: Most of the footballing nations are in offseason - A chance to import talent. Recruit reserve players to consider playing here. Not a business opportunity as much as it is a personel one.

Opportunities (perhaps a strength?): Visibility of the global game - More people are aware of the european leagues in this country more than ever. Kids know who Juventus and Real Madrid and Manchester United are. Soccer programming (on specialty channels) has exploded over the last few years. Soccer is slowly but surely becoming mainstream in Canada and awareness is growing. Convincing the masses that Winnipeg FC is as entertaining live as watching Sampadoria take on Udinese is on TV (meaning, converting the ratings that these shows get into patrons).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:Originally posted by Danny Boy

This is exactly the type of thing I have problems with. #1 suggests this league, the #2 says, where's the money, stadium blah blah blah.
Asking questions about money, stadiums etc. is absolutely critical. Once those have been answered the rest comes relatively easily. Addressing general strengths, weaknesses pros, cons etc. is all very well and pads out any business plan but without money and a comprehensive viable plan you will go nowhere except wear out your keyboard posting dreamy wishlists to this forum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, the party pooper is here.

quote:Originally posted by Danny Boy

Why can't we come up with a solution? What were the mistakes that were made? I hardly read of the bad decisions the CSL made because I don't think anyone here honestly knows what decisions were made. Let's start listing all the major mistakes that have been made.

Here, the key to success, MONEY. Lots of it. MLS has lost 3.7 Trillion dollars in ten years.

quote:Originally posted by Danny Boy

I wonder if gaming is an option for a league. Maybe we could position the league closer to Horse racing or Jai Alai. Have slot machines at stadiums and people could bet on which team will win. Kinda far fetched and possibly illegal but could it work?

Maybe Stronach would be interested then. Yeah, tell him to build slot machines, but instead of horse races, their could be soccer matches, same thing. People could bet on how many times each player will dive or something. [:P]

TV revenue potential - as much as the NHL gets...in the US that is.

How much is the USA National (gridiron) Football Association involved with the NFL? How much is Hockey Canada involved with the NHL?

quote:Originally posted by Richard

Good, let me get the ball rolling. I suggest that for a team comprising unpaid players, run by volunteers recouping only their direct expenses and coaching staff paid only an honorarium to participate in a regional 12 team league, an operating budget of $50,000 to $100,000 would be a reasonable starting point. This does not include the cost of participation in any national cup championship or travel outside of the region and careful management will be required to keep within such a budget as costs escalate very quickly.

Um, you mean like the CPSL, or like the PCSL? Or like the Alberta Major Soccer League or the Manitoba Super Soccer League or the Nova Scotia Senior Soccer League?

The problem with unpaid players is they have to work. Some work days, some work nights, some work shifts, some work weekends. So this means they can't practise as team consistently, and they can't take off for 3-4-5 days to play a game or two.

The reason the team's can't get to the next level, is cause they are run by volunteers, most who can't organize a bbq fundraiser. Oh, and cause most people don't care.

quote:Originally posted by Danny Boy

OPPORTUNITIES:

4) Get markting mentorship from NHL.

Marketing mentorship from the NHL? An opportunity? Oh, I get it, sarcasm! Clever! [:P]

Here's a wild and wacky idea, as fans, we can get out there and support our local clubs, buy tickets, drag our friends and families to the games, get involved in our local youth amateur clubs, tell businesses to support local soccer teams, call local media and nicely tell them about interesting local soccer stories, etc.

To the owners, cause I'm sure they will listen to me, if they each focused on their own team, in their own area, and not worried about anybody else, they will succeed. For example, the W-CPSL, why? They can barely run the mens' league.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, the party pooper is here.

quote:Originally posted by Danny Boy

Why can't we come up with a solution? What were the mistakes that were made? I hardly read of the bad decisions the CSL made because I don't think anyone here honestly knows what decisions were made. Let's start listing all the major mistakes that have been made.

Here, the key to success, MONEY. Lots of it. MLS has lost 3.7 Trillion dollars in ten years.

quote:Originally posted by Danny Boy

I wonder if gaming is an option for a league. Maybe we could position the league closer to Horse racing or Jai Alai. Have slot machines at stadiums and people could bet on which team will win. Kinda far fetched and possibly illegal but could it work?

Maybe Stronach would be interested then. Yeah, tell him to build slot machines, but instead of horse races, their could be soccer matches, same thing. People could bet on how many times each player will dive or something. [:P]

TV revenue potential - as much as the NHL gets...in the US that is.

How much is the USA National (gridiron) Football Association involved with the NFL? How much is Hockey Canada involved with the NHL?

quote:Originally posted by Richard

Good, let me get the ball rolling. I suggest that for a team comprising unpaid players, run by volunteers recouping only their direct expenses and coaching staff paid only an honorarium to participate in a regional 12 team league, an operating budget of $50,000 to $100,000 would be a reasonable starting point. This does not include the cost of participation in any national cup championship or travel outside of the region and careful management will be required to keep within such a budget as costs escalate very quickly.

Um, you mean like the CPSL, or like the PCSL? Or like the Alberta Major Soccer League or the Manitoba Super Soccer League or the Nova Scotia Senior Soccer League?

The problem with unpaid players is they have to work. Some work days, some work nights, some work shifts, some work weekends. So this means they can't practise as team consistently, and they can't take off for 3-4-5 days to play a game or two.

The reason the team's can't get to the next level, is cause they are run by volunteers, most who can't organize a bbq fundraiser. Oh, and cause most people don't care.

quote:Originally posted by Danny Boy

OPPORTUNITIES:

4) Get markting mentorship from NHL.

Marketing mentorship from the NHL? An opportunity? Oh, I get it, sarcasm! Clever! [:P]

Here's a wild and wacky idea, as fans, we can get out there and support our local clubs, buy tickets, drag our friends and families to the games, get involved in our local youth amateur clubs, tell businesses to support local soccer teams, call local media and nicely tell them about interesting local soccer stories, etc.

To the owners, cause I'm sure they will listen to me, if they each focused on their own team, in their own area, and not worried about anybody else, they will succeed. For example, the W-CPSL, why? They can barely run the mens' league.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:Originally posted by Elias

Okay, the party pooper is here.

Here, the key to success, MONEY. Lots of it. MLS has lost 3.7 Trillion dollars in ten years.

A national league could include corporate team. There was a time when large Canadian corporations organized soccer teams. This is also a common practise in Japan, Korea and many other countries. Offer a promising soccer player a good paying job, time off for practices and travelling to games, kits plastered with the company logo and the chance to stay in Canada and watch our talent pool grow. The forrestry, mining and software industries are but a few to be considered. The prestige off having a championship team would raise the image and prestige of any large corporation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets just get it done. Come up with the idea and the ask clubs and cities to submit bids to become part of the league. If you do it by way of secret tender, you would be suprised by the interest. The CSA would select the best candidates, given finances, city backing, venue etc.

12 teams in the East

8 in the West

6 top in East and top 4 in West get promoted to the Premier League which would run from Aug to Oct.

Cost to join league 50,000.00, 600,000 returned to the top 6 teams in the East and 400,000 to top 4 teams in the West.

Initial stage of league will be a regional competition. Teams must select majority of players from local region. There would be no set minimum salary but the teams would train 5 days a week to be on par with a pro league. When the league enters the Premier League stage more players from outside the region would be allowed making it a select league. The regional competition could be more like a pdl league and then the premier more like the A-league.

Why this will work?

-it would be a non for profit league, club based. It will generate a lot of interest in the local soccer community because it initially will be regionally based with local soccer athletes involved. Further interest will be generated as clubs watch to see if their club makes it to the premier league.

-the league will be split so 1/2 the time is spent regionally thus reducing travel costs substantially over the A-league. A requirement that the players be selected locally will further reduce the need for competition for players and thus higher salaries for the teams;

-the league will not benefit from imported talent (at least at the regional competition stage) however it still will have the benefit of full training (stipulation of league) to make it professional.

This league will be better at developing soccer interest in Canada, developing talent and would be sustainable.

Developing Soccer Interest

It would be our own league with Canadian teams. Further, the intial stage will see a lot of teams competeting regionally thus broadening the exposure and interest to other areas of Canada. The regional and promotion variance of this league will promote interest as smaller teams in smaller centres could see their team promoted thus generating interest.

Development of Talent

The talent base would be 100% Canadian. In the regional league version talent would be selected from the local region with only a few players oustide the region being allowed depending on the size of the region. The Premier League would be more of a select league allowing teams to select more players from outside their region. The A League cost structure increases as competition for foreign players is required. The Canadian proposed league would keep salaries lower as the players would have to be selected from the local region.

Sustainable

Bid Cities and clubs would be selected on a long term committment. This league would be sustainable as it would have less reliance on gate revenue. The cost structure would be lower that the A-League as result of lower travel and salary costs. The CSA and Provincial Association can you use existing personnel and volunteers to market the league such as websites etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...